Some tribes use these jobs tears for adornment..necklaces in particular, they eat it and most fun is its brewed into a country / tribal liquor… which sounds like ZUUU …
and in a weekend course on biblical plants it was mentioned that in china and Japan and may be even India..
the grain (its after all of a grass family, if I remember it) the seeds are ground up and used as flour… rich in protein and some micro nutrients (dont ask me which ones, I dont remember) … Job’s tears are quite a group of grains… best use I like is the beads use and ūüôā the country liquor, ha ha…
MOST IMPORTANT IS ITS Ant-iangiogenesis effect and overall anti cancer activity was being studies as Kanglaite…;¬†
 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Poaceae%20-3--3.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Poaceae%20-5--7.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Habit-3.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Poaceae%20-7--6.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Poaceae%20-8--8.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Poaceae%20-4--7.JPG

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Poaceae%20-2--4.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Poaceae%20-1--9.JPG
Poaceae for ID :: MK 2017 Jan-04 : 5 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (8)

Please help to ID this tall grass.
Height: 3-5 feet
Habitat: Fallow and near dry water-body
Alt.: 126 m asl
Date: 28 Dec 2016

Place: Guntur Dist., AP


coix lacryma-jobi


It is Chionachne koenigii


Chionachne koenigii


Relevant feedback from another thread:
………….. The Guntur photos as again Chionachne koenigii.
It is clear that Chionachne koenigii is definitely different from Coix gigantea even when treated as Chionachne gigantea. As per priority rule, the genus Coix will prevail over Chionachne, even if someone wants to consider both under the same genus. But there are very distinct differences between the two genera. The new combination of Chionachne gigantea with all the others being treated as synonyms is published in the revision of Chionachne in Blumea. But definitely there is some mistake. I have not yet gone through the full paper of revision of Chionachne published in Blumea. Once I get a copy of this and go through, I will respond further.


Oh !!! 

This is much different !!! 


This is Chionachne koenigii


 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Chionachne%20koengii%201.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Chionachne%20koengii.jpg


 
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/grass_kmk_120918_DSCN2059.jpg

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/grass_kmk_120918_DSCN2054.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/grass_kmk_120918_DSCN2057b-8.jpg
I found this grass on a narrow strip of wasteland lying between railway tracks and a paddy field. I captured only a few distant shots using my 5x compact. It was not possible to go closer to record leaf or inflorescence size. So, i give an approximate value. Could it be Coix lacryma-jobi L.?
Species : UNKNOWN
Habit & Habitat : height – avg. 5 feet, a few more than 7 feet, leaves – 1 foot or more x 1.5 inches or a bit more
Date : 18/9/12, 9.58 a.m.
Place : Hooghly


This is Chionachne koenigii (Spreng.) Thw. Also known as Coix koenigii.


/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN6439.jpg

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN6438.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN6441.jpg

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN6436.jpg

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN6435.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN6437.jpg

I am adding some more pictures in this thread. This grass is growing 20 feet away from the the grass in the previous set of photographs in this post. The place is the same strip of the land lying between rail tracks and paddy filed.

I think this is also Coix gigantea as per your keys in another thread at – https://groups.google.com/d/topic/indiantreepix/DSlTblj9k0I/discussion.
These pictures were taken yesterday, 3rd Nov., 2012.

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN3625-3.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN3630.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN3633.jpg

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN3634.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN3628.jpg

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN3639.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN3641.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN3658-3.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN3659.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN3621.jpg

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN3652.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN3622-3.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN3623-6.jpg
grass Chionachne? from Hooghly 8/10/12 sk2:

Found this grass in a roadside waste place. Is this the same Chionachne koenigii (Spreng.) as in my earlier post at – https://groups.google.com/d/topic/indiantreepix/FW5XrKtEnho/discussion?
Species : Chionachne koenigii (Spreng.)
Habit & Habitat : about 5.5. feet high, some even 7 feet or more; leaf avg. 45 cm x 5 cm
Date : 8/10/12, 10.11 a.m.
Place : Hooghly


Can u try with Coix ??????


It looks like Coix lacryma-jobi. Moreover, as per Flora of Pakistan the leaves of Chionachne koenigii are narrower than what can be seen in my post. But i am not sure.


This is Coix gigantea. You can see the large wings on the glumes of the male spikelets. The earlier post was not showing the spikelets very clear. It could also be Coix gigantea. You can see if the plant in the earlier post had winged glumes and whether the stems/leaf sheaths were having stinging hairs, if so it is Chionachne. The female spikelet of Chionachne koenigii is flatter than Coix. Both are tall and the habit and habitat are also similar in both genera. 


Thank you very much for all details on Coix and Chionachne. This grass is from another place and i could not get closer to the species of the earlier post. I think i will be able to identify the three species in future, based upon the keys you have given here. Descriptions available in Flora of China and Flora of Pakistan are often confusing. specially regarding the leaves sizes.


Thanks, …, for the Id.
Do you think that they are different ?


Thank you for the links. I think they have made a grave mistake. It is ok whatever genus name they want to put, Coix and Chionachne may be treated under the same genus, though there are characters sufficient enough to treat them differently. However, both koenigii and gigantea are entirely different species.  

The main difference between the two genera are the shape and position of the ‘bead’, i.e, the female spikelet. In Coix, it is enclosed by the leaf sheath modified involucre to look like a spherical ovate to orbicular bead and completely exserted, whereas in Chionachne, the female spikelet is a compressed, oblong bead and not exserted completely and the leaf sheath is not modified into an involucre . Another major difference is the presence of stinging hairs in Chionachne, whereas Coix does not have such hairs. Hence Coix is more palatable and a good fodder, whereas Chionachne is not. Coix is more common in moist and waterlogged and abandoned agriculture fields, canal banks, etc., wheras Chionachne is a species found in similar habitat in forest areas.¬†


Relevant feedback from another thread:
………….. Coix gigantea (both Hoogly photos) …..
It is clear that Chionachne koenigii is definitely different from Coix gigantea even when treated as Chionachne gigantea. As per priority rule, the genus Coix will prevail over Chionachne, even if someone wants to consider both under the same genus. But there are very distinct differences between the two genera. The new combination of Chionachne gigantea with all the others being treated as synonyms is published in the revision of Chionachne in Blumea. But definitely there is some mistake. I have not yet gone through the full paper of revision of Chionachne published in Blumea. Once I get a copy of this and go through, I will respond further.


This is very similar to my recordings from Siwan, Bihar, though my photos are not that good. 


Coix gigantea


Coix vs Chinoachne : 8 posts by 3 authors.
Here is a question to Poaceae experts …Are we sure the posts included in subpage Chionachne gigantea are Chionachne gigantea and not Coix species ?
How to differentiate two genera ?

The page contains both Chionachne koenigii (the pench photo) and many of the other photos are Coix spp., Coix aquatica (Orissa photo), Coix lachryma-jobi and Coix gigantea (both Hoogly photos) and also male spikelets of Polytoca digitata (The Thane photos which myself had misidentified as Coix gigantea male spikelets). The Guntur photos as again Chionachne koenigii.

It is clear that Chionachne koenigii is definitely different from Coix gigantea even when treated as Chionachne gigantea. As per priority rule, the genus Coix will prevail over Chionachne, even if someone wants to consider both under the same genus. But there are very distinct differences between the two genera. The new combination of Chionachne gigantea with all the others being treated as synonyms is published in the revision of Chionachne in Blumea. But definitely there is some mistake. I have not yet gone through the full paper of revision of Chionachne published in Blumea. Once I get a copy of this and go through, I will respond further.


Thanks a lot, …,
Currently WCSP gives as below:
Polytoca gigantea (J.Koenig) Mabb., Mabberley’s Pl.-Book, ed. 4: 1102 (2017).
Homotypic Names:

Heterotypic Synonyms:


Thank you very much for the document. I have gone through it in detail. The treatment of Chionachne gigantea is not at all convincing. Chionachne koengii is a very good species and cannot be equated with Coix gigantea or Chionachne gigantea. The illustration provided against Chionachne gigantea is actually Coix gigantea and does not in any way match other Chionachne species. I suggest authors should retain the name Chionachne koengii, which is not that common and very much different from Coix gigantea, which is actually very common. The introductory part of the revision is also very vague and lacks proper structure to understand.


References:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *