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Desert-pea, Glory-pea, Sturt’s desert-pea 
.
Perennial herb with alternate imparipinnate leaves, leaflets densely covered with greyish hairs, 2.5 cm long; flowers in short axillary racemes, up to 7 cm long, red with a large purple-black blotch at base; fruit 6 cm long 
.

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Fabaceae-Faboideae (Papilionaceae) Week: Swainsona formosa from Delhi:  Swainsona formosa (G. Don) Joy Thomps., Telopea 4:4. 1990

syn: Donia formosa G. Don; Clianthus formosus (G. Don) Ford & Vickery; Clianthus speciosus (G. Don) Asch. & Graebn. 
Common names: desert-pea, glory-pea, Sturt’s desert-pea 
Perennial herb with alternate imparipinnate leaves, leaflets densely covered with greyish hairs, 2.5 cm long; flowers in short axillary racemes, up to 7 cm long, red with a large purple-black blotch at base; fruit 6 cm long 

Photographed from Delhi University Flower Show in February.


Oh bright red colour. Doesn’t appear like Papilionaceae at first glance….



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Flora Australia-59: Swainsona formosa-flowers of a shrub.


Yes … We often have this displayed in DU flower show every year.


…., thanks. When the flower show is arranged pl ?


Last week (Friday) of February every year


This plant is Clianthus puniceus (Parrots Beak).


As per Flora of New south Wales (Australia) this is Swainsona formosa pl.

crotolaria cunninghamii is known as Parrot Pea.


This species is often confused with Clianthus puniceus, but latter does not have black spot on corolla and leaves greenish and almost glabrous.


Another connected thread for correct Id determination



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Fabaceae week-29-Australia:  swainsona formosa or Clianthus formosa.
Being fabaceae week I am resending the same.


Earlier thread in this regard


I had to look at this when I saw the title of the posting. this is easy to answer.
This is the “Sturt’s Desert pea” , a well-known Australian native flower (floral emblem of the state of South Australia). Much admired but notoriously hard to grow outside its natural desert environment.
There is now a grafted Sturt’s Desert pea on the market in Australia (not sure about export). Its rootstock is the New Zealand glory pea (Clianthus puniceus) which gives it some resistance to fungal diseases and root rots.
Swainsona formosa (G. Don) J. Thompson (previously known as Clianthus formosus (G. Don) Ford & Vicker. Other synonyms are: Clianthus dampieri Lindl., Clianthus speciosus (G. Don) Asch. & Graebn.
Common name synonyms are: Desert pea, Lobster Claw, and Glory pea.
It is possible to buy seeds in Australia but the growing is best left to green fingers looking for a challenge.


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Swainsona formosa (G. Don) Joy Thomps., Telopea 4:4. 1990

syn: Donia formosa G. Don; Clianthus formosus (G. Don) Ford & Vickery; Clianthus speciosus (G. Don) Asch. & Graebn. 
Common names: desert-pea, glory-pea, Sturt’s desert-pea 
Perennial herb with alternate imparipinnate leaves, leaflets densely covered with greyish hairs, 2.5 cm long; flowers in short axillary racemes, up to 7 cm long, red with a large purple-black blotch at base; fruit 6 cm long 

Photographed from Delhi University Flower Show in February.


very popular in garden shows and annual winter garden shows in this hot hot weather



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Fab fortnight-UP-Aus-6 : 1 post by 1 author. Attachments (2)

From australia Swainsona formosa.



 


Fower show at the Eden Gardens, Kolkata-30th jan. ’10; Blooms from spring to summer, particularly after rain as per Wikipedia link. ID of flowering tree. – indiantreepix | Google Groups A query – efloraofindia | Google Groups Crimson bloom – efloraofindia | Google Groups


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References:

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