Zea mays L., Sp. Pl. 971 1753. (syn: Mays americana Baumg. [Illegitimate]; Mays vulgaris Ser.; Mays zea Gaertn. [Illegitimate]; Mayzea cerealis Raf. [Illegitimate] .; Mayzea vestita Raf.; Thalysia mays (L.) Kuntze [Illegitimate]; Zea alba Mill.; Zea altissima J.F.Gmel. ex Steud. [Invalid]; Zea americana Mill.; Zea amylacea Sturtev.; Zea amyleosaccharata Sturtev. ex L.H.Bailey; Zea canina S.Watson; Zea cryptosperma Bonaf. [Illegitimate]; Zea curagua Molina; Zea erythrolepis Bonaf.; Zea everta Sturtev.; Zea gigantea Voss [Invalid]; Zea glumacea Larrañaga; Zea gracillima Voss; Zea hirta Bonaf.; Zea indentata Sturtev.; Zea indurata Sturtev.; Zea japonica Van Houtte; Zea macrosperma Klotzsch; Zea mays subsp. acuminata Golosk. …………………………….; Zea minima Voss [Invalid]; Zea minor J.F.Gmel. ex Steud. [Invalid]; Zea mucronata Poit. ex Vilm.; Zea odontosperma Ten.; Zea oryzoides Golosk.; Zea praecox Steud. [Invalid]; Zea rostrata Bonaf.; Zea saccharata Sturtev.; Zea segetalis Salisb. [Illegitimate]; Zea tunicata (A.St.Hil.) Sturtev. ex L.H.Bailey; Zea vaginata Sturtev. [Invalid]; Zea vittata Voss [Invalid]; Zea vulgaris Mill.); 
ZEE-uh — cause of lifeDave’s Botanary
maze — our motherDave’s Botanary

commonly known as: Indian corn, maize • Assamese: গোম-ধান gom-dhan • Bengali: ভুট্টা bhutta, মকাই makai, মক্কা makka • Gujarati: મકાઈ makai • Hindi: भुट्टा bhutta, मकाई makai, मक्का makka • Kannada: ಮೆಕ್ಕೆ ಜೋಳ mekke jola, ಮುಸುಕಿನ ಜೋಳ musukina jola • Kashmiri: गवेधुका gavedhuka, मकोयू makoyu • Konkani: जोळु jolu • Lushai: vaimîm • Malayalam: ചോളം cholam • Manipuri: চুজাক chujak • Marathi: मका maka, भुटा bhuta, भुट्टा bhutta • Mizo: vaimim • Nepalese: भुट्टा bhutta, मकाइ makai • Oriya: ଜନାର୍ janar, ମକା maka • Punjabi: ਚੁਲੀ ਕੋਕਰੀ chuli kokri, ਮਕ mak, ਮਕੈਈ makai • Tamil: மக்காச்சோளம் makka-c-colam, முத்துச்சோளம் muttu-c-colam • Telugu: మొక్క జొన్న mokka jonna • Urdu: بهٿا bhutta, مکا makka, مکائي makai

Native of: Mexico, Guatemala; cultivated elsewhere



The maize plant is often 2.5 m (meters) (8 ft) in height, though some natural strains can grow 12 m (40 ft).[10] The stem has the appearance of a bamboo cane and is commonly composed of 20 internodes of 18 cm (7 in) length.[11] [12] A leaf grows from each node, which is generally 9 cm (3.5 in) in width and 120 cm (4 ft) in length.
Ears develop above a few of the leaves in the midsection of the plant, between the stem and leaf sheath, elongating by[citation needed] ~ 3 mm/day, to a length of 18 cm (7 in) (60 cm/24 in being the maximum observed in the subspecies [13]). They are female inflorescences, tightly enveloped by several layers of ear leaves commonly called husks. Certain varieties of maize have been bred to produce many additional developed ears. These are the source of the “baby corn” used as a vegetable in Asian cuisine.
The apex of the stem ends in the tassel, an inflorescence of male flowers. When the tassel is mature and conditions are suitably warm and dry, anthers on the tassel dehisce and release pollen. Maize pollen is anemophilous (dispersed by wind), and because of its large settling velocity, most pollen falls within a few meters of the tassel.
Elongated stigmas, called silks, emerge from the whorl of husk leaves at the end of the ear. They are often pale yellow and 7 in (178 mm) in length, like tufts of hair in appearance. At the end of each is a carpel, which may develop into a “kernel” if fertilized by a pollen grain. The pericarp of the fruit is fused with the seed coat referred to as “caryopsis“, typical of the grasses, and the entire kernel is often referred to as the “seed“. The cob is close to a multiple fruit in structure, except that the individual fruits (the kernels) never fuse into a single mass. The grains are about the size of peas, and adhere in regular rows around a white, pithy substance, which forms the ear (maximum size of kernel in subspecies is reputedly 2.5 cm/1 in [14]). An ear commonly holds 600 kernels. They are of various colors: blackish, bluish-gray, purple, green, red, white and yellow.
When ground into flour, maize yields more flour with much less bran than wheat does. It lacks the protein gluten of wheat and, therefore, makes baked goods with poor rising capability. A genetic variant that accumulates more sugar and less starch in the ear is consumed as a vegetable and is called sweet corn. Young ears can be consumed raw, with the cob and silk, but as the plant matures (usually during the summer months), the cob becomes tougher and the silk dries to inedibility. By the end of the growing season, the kernels dry out and become difficult to chew without cooking them tender first in boiling water. 
(From Wikipedia on 15.4.13)


 
 
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Poaceae (formerly and a.k.a. Gramineae) » Zea mays
Synonyms: Euchlaena mexicana and many others

ZEE-uh — cause of life        
maze — our mother
 
Native of: Mexico, Guatemala; cultivated elsewhere
sightings are from between DEC 09 and MAY 10 at Rajguru Nagar, Pune.


– in the subject line “NATIVE” to be ignored … please read it as “CULTIVATED”

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3 posts by 2 authors.
Zea mays from Lohari Panipat


Thanks for sharing Bhutta plant or Maka मका 

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Poaceae
Zea mays L. 
ZEE-uh — cause of lifeDave’s Botanary
maze — our motherDave’s Botanary
commonly known as: Indian corn, maize • Assamese: গোম-ধান gom-dhan • Bengali: ভুট্টা bhutta, মকাই makai, মক্কা makka • Gujarati: મકાઈ makai • Hindi: भुट्टा bhutta, मकाई makai, मक्का makka • Kannada: ಮೆಕ್ಕೆ ಜೋಳ mekke jola, ಮುಸುಕಿನ ಜೋಳ musukina jola • Kashmiri: गवेधुका gavedhuka, मकोयू makoyu • Konkani: जोळु jolu • Lushai: vaimîm • Malayalam: ചോളം cholam • Manipuri: চুজাক chujak • Marathi: मका maka, भुटा bhuta, भुट्टा bhutta • Mizo: vaimim • Nepalese: भुट्टा bhutta, मकाइ makai • Oriya: ଜନାର୍ janar, ମକା maka • Punjabi: ਚੁਲੀ ਕੋਕਰੀ chuli kokri, ਮਕ mak, ਮਕੈਈ makai • Tamil: மக்காச்சோளம் makka-c-colam, முத்துச்சோளம் muttu-c-colam • Telugu: మొక్క జొన్న mokka jonna • Urdu: بهٿا bhutta, مکا makka, مکائي makai
Native of: Mexico, Guatemala; cultivated elsewhere
References: Flowers of IndiaWikipediaNPGS / GRINENVIS – FRLHTDDSA 
at Rajgurunagar near Pune on 26 DEC 09


A wonderrful close up of the Tassel or male inflorescence of Zea mays


Very well illustrated upload


Thanks … Till now I have not seen a farm or plant of maize. Thanks for good photos and relevant information.


Attachments (8).  3 posts by 3 authors.
Zea mays the common maize plant photographed from Delhi and Kashmir


Lovely pics..


I found a meaning here. http://bioweb.uwlax.edu/bio203/s2008/knudsen_ashl/

The word Zea mays comes from two languages. Zea comes from ancient Greek and is a generic name for cereal and grains. Some scientists believe it also means “sustains life.” Mays comes from the language Taino, which was spoken by aboriginal groups in the Antilles. It means “life giver.” 


 

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Zea mays L. Red Waxy Corn : 4 posts by 1 author. 4 images- 6 to 7 mb each.

Location: Gyaneswor, Kathmandu, Nepal
Date: 21 May 2020

Altitude: 1300 m.

Habitat : Cultivated


 

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