Common names: capon’s-feather, columbine, European columbine, European crowfoot, granny bonnets
Perennial herb up to 70 cm tall; basal leaves twice ternate compound, shorter than stems; leaflets apically 2-3 fid, pilose or glabrous; flowers on long branched axis, nodding, usually 3 or more together;sepals blue or purple, ovate-lanceolate, up to 2.5 cm long; petals blue or purple, blade up to 12 mm long, oblong, rounded at tip, spur hooked, stout, up to 20 mm long; follicles up to 2.5 cm long with up to 15 mm long beak

 

 

 


 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_6779.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_6788.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_6789.JPG

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_6783.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_6780.JPG

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_6781.JPG

Akelei Fotos from Ritterhude June 2010: These plants are supposed to be Akelei.


–  This is Aquilegia vulgaris

The English equivalent for your sporn is spur, as I had mentioned earlier: Aquilegia has 5, Delphinium 1. I am still not able to reconcile about the other plant. It looks different to me, although leaves definitely resemble Aquilegia vulgaris.

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_0659.JPG

a variety of Akelei (Aquilegia )?: The leaves look like those of Akelei but the flower is very different.

This is most probably a garden variety called: Aquilegia vulgaris var. stellata Nora Barlow


On net I found some more interesting information, after knowing the exact ID:
The frilly pink & white double aquilegia `Nora Barlow’, which has become popular recently, might suggest an equally frilly namesake. But not a bit of it: Emma Nora Barlow (December 22, 1885 – December 1989) was a formidable woman, who died at the age of 104. She was a granddaughter of Charles Darwin, about whom she wrote a book in the time she could spare from raising six children, gardening, looking after horses, bird-watching and running the local Girl Guides.
Having studied genetics at Cambridge, Nora Barlow enjoyed hybridising plants and, although she was probably not the originator of the unusual aquilegia variety, she grew it in her garden (although her taste was generally for
plainer flowers) and gave some seeds to the nurseryman Alan Bloom who named his commercial stock after her.
She also gave her house, The Orchard, to the University of Cambridge in 1962. New Hall College for women was founded on the land.

    Aquilegia are clump-forming herbaceous perennials with long-stalked, alternately divided basal leaves and erect, leafy stems bearing bell-shaped flowers with conspicuous spurs, on branched stems.
‘Nora Barlow’ is an erect plant to 80cm, with divided, dark green leaves and nodding, spur-less, double flowers 2 to 3cm in width, composed of many narrow, dull deep pink and pale green petals. A Cottage Garden classic.
Aquilegia ‘Nora Barlow’ has been awarded the prestigious RHS Award of Garden Merit (AGM).   Source:
http://www.seedaholic.com/aquilegia-vulgaris-var-stellata-nora-barlow…


 

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_0676.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_0675.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_0651.JPG

Blue Akelei (Aquilegia vulgaris?) from my garden in Ritterhude: Fotos taken in may 2011.
I had sent Fotos of the spurs a few days back.


 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_0827.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_0828.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_0739.JPG
another pinkish Akelei from my garden in Ritterhude: It is the same plant though the flowers on the same plant look a bit different.

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_0584.JPG

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_0580.JPG

Akelei from a private garden in Bremen: I find the colors fascinating. In the same garden I watched white Akelei, but they were too far. Perhaps I shall go there again on the weekend and hope to find someone there that I can ask.


/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_0662.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/100_0668.JPG

guess what this is:  guess what it is. Certainly not caps of the seven dwarfs.


 

Some Delphinium spur chopped off :P???


Aquilegia caerulea blue star from my garden.
not chopped off but fallen down. I havn’t seen just the spurs falling off,
when the flower is getting old.
This is from my garden in Ritterhude. Flowers fotographed yesterday (14.5)
Spurs collected and fotographed today 15.5.2011


 

On a more serious note, it may not be Aquilegia caerulea in which spurs are very narrow and  up to 5 cm long. May be A. vulgaris or any other species.


 

these are the only fotos I have, did not measure the spur length. Sorry.
Perhaps the holding hand may give some idea about the length. Otherwise will have to wait till next year.
But one thing is certain, the flowers change their size from year to year, depending upon the weather.


This looks very like one of the many cultivated forms of Aquilegia vulgaris.


 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Aquilegia-vulgaris-Botanical%20garden-IMG_3116-Kashmir-1a.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Aquilegia-vulgaris-Botanical%20garden-IMG_3107-Kashmir-2a.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Aquilegia-vulgaris-Botanical%20garden-IMG_3110-Kashmir-3.jpg
May 18, “Fascination of Plants Day” : Aquilegia vulgaris from Kashmir: One of the most beautiful species of Aquilegia, found in wide range of colours and patterns. Photographed from Botanical Garden below Cheshmashahi, Srinagar, Kashmir in May, 2012. 
Aquilegia vulgaris Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 1: 533. 1753
Common names: capon’s-feather, columbine, European columbine, European crowfoot, granny bonnets

Perennial herb up to 70 cm tall; basal leaves twice ternate compound, shorter than stems; leaflets apically 2-3 fid, pilose or glabrous; flowers on long branched axis, nodding, usually 3 or more together;sepals blue or purple, ovate-lanceolate, up to 2.5 cm long; petals blue or purple, blade up to 12 mm long, oblong, rounded at tip, spur hooked, stout, up to 20 mm long; follicles up to 2.5 cm long with up to 15 mm long beak.


/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Aquilegia-vulgaris-Botanical%20garden-IMG_3115-a.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Aquilegia-vulgaris-Botanical%20garden-IMG_3107-Kashmir-2a-7.jpg

 

Ranunculaceae Fortnight: Aquilegia vulgaris from Kashmir-GSJAN17/17 : 2 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (2)

Aquilegia vulgaris Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 1: 533. 1753
Common names: capon’s-feather, columbine, European columbine, European crowfoot, granny bonnets

Perennial herb up to 70 cm tall; basal leaves twice ternate compound, shorter than stems; leaflets apically 2-3 fid, pilose or glabrous; flowers on long branched axis, nodding, usually 3 or more together;sepals blue or purple, ovate-lanceolate, up to 2.5 cm long; petals blue or purple, blade up to 12 mm long, oblong, rounded at tip, spur hooked, stout, up to 20 mm long; follicles up to 2.5 cm long with up to 15 mm long beak.


 


ID request from a newbie..:  My first mail of request and I am asking help to ID the flower which got
me into studying wildflowers in Dalhousie (Chamba) HP.
Date/Time- May 2010

Location- Kalatope wildlife Sanctuary, Chamba dist. Himachal Pradesh, India approx. 2400 mts altitude
Habitat- Wild
Plant Habit- Herb
Height/Length- approx. 2 feet

Looking at leaves it appears Corydalis (flower head reminds Trifolium). If flowers and leaves belong to the same plant, the closest match seems to be Corydalis cashmeriana (though inflorescence is more dense).


can it be Akelei (germanname) (Aquilegia)?


both the ‘corydalis’ and columbine family had come to mind but crossed them off as the flower does not match any features of these.. it IS quite interesting… :)) and … the leaves ARE of the same plant…. it was found in a very remote part of the sanctuary.. we call it ‘the lost forest”.
Thanks for your continued interest.. gives me heart to feel that we may stumble across some clue..


YAHOO…!! It IS from the family {Akelei (german name)} Aquilegia…

I chanced upon a lost photograph from my archives of the seed pod and it definitely reminds me of the columbine family… is it presumptuous of me?? But to my limited knowledge it does indeed look like that… some
kind of a freak wild hybrid of a double columbine.. perhaps something like Aquilegia vulgaris var stellata in blue..

This is turning out to be really interesting. Your this photograph clearly belongs to Ranunculaceae, either Delphinium or Aquilegia. But looking at the flowers especially in the second photograph, I am unable to decide whether it is a single flower (with numerous petals) or a cluster of flowers. In the second option I can see only single spur (Aquilegia should have five), but then calyx + corolla should have maximum 10 members. Here I see many.     Perhaps some one will resolve the mystery.


I feel that it is some sort of hybride. I have three diff. sorts  of Akelei in my garden, shall send fotos when they flower. At present there is snow everywhere.
I am not an expert, but my observation is that Delphinium  has just one Sporn (sorry, i don’t know the english word for it. my translator suggested
spur, tailskid, tail wheel, ram, trail spade, whereas Akelei has many. In the second Foto i see many, so i suggested Akelei. Again, I am NOT an expert. Here are some links, where one can see fotos of Akelei. http://www.saatgut-vielfalt.de/saatgut/product.php?products_id=910810
http://www.pflanzenversand-gaissmayer.de/article_detail,Aquilegia+Vul…
http://www.google.de/images?oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:de:official&clie…


As … said Aquilegia vulgaris (var stellata) for example has hybrid (double columbine) varieties… which seem similar in certain characteristics… but to have it in a totally wild area… is something strange… I do not know about hybrids.. can they develop on their own?? You would have a better idea..


Hybrids can of course develop on their own specially if the species concerned are cross pollinated in nature. Not a big deal about that.


So this would seem to be a hybrid between columbine and delphenium varities!!
Since obviously it has traits of both of them… The part of this forest where I found it did indeed have a lot of Columbine… but Delphenium….. hmmmm.. don,t remember…..


I did go to the same observation site this year and sadly did not happen to see it this year.. maybe because of excessive rain this year and less sunshine.. I cannot be certain…
But I have not given up on this as yet and will try again next season…


Aquilegia vulgaris hybrids??


Any link ?
Leaves look different at Aquilegia vulgaris


Yes. May be a Aquilegia vulgaris hybrid as per discussions at Resurfacing my first Mail for id – Al061012


Resurfacing my first Mail for id – Al061012: One of my first observations for id on this forum was
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/indiantreepix/Opumiw6CeSM/dLoaxLNQIa8J
This year I found the flower again after a gap of two years… a hybrid between Delphinium and Columbine….
The day I had found this flower I tried to ring up … to seek guidance but unfortunately he was not available on the phone to help so I took a lot of photos.. but this time the flower was not in a prime condition as last time… Still I post the new photographs for you
Location Kalatop, Chamba
Altitude 2400 mts
Habit Herb
Habitat wild
Flowering Season June
Height 18 inches
The measurement scale was in mm just to get a rough idea… and in the leaf comparison in DSCN6516 the larger leaves are of Columbine which were growing all around this place…. and this flowering plant was the
ONLY ONE of it’s kind…


Aquilegia vulgaris hybrid ?


Thanks, …, Any links?


 

References:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *