Nepenthes rafflesiana Jack , Compan. Bot. Mag. 1: 271 1836.; 
It is common in Borneo and parts of the Riau Archipelago, but has a restricted distribution in both Peninsular Malaysia and Sumatra. It is only widespread in the southeastern region of the Malay Peninsula, particularly in the state of Johor, where it is relatively abundant. Nepenthes rafflesiana has only been recorded from the west coast of Sumatra, between Indrapura and Barus.[4] It is also found in Singapore and on a number of smaller islands, including Bangka, Labuan,[5] Natuna,[6] and the Lingga Islands as per Wikipedia;
 
Nepenthes rafflesiana Jack ex Hook. f. Compan. Bot. Mag. 1:270. 1836.
Family: Nepenthaceae
Location: TBGRI, Palode, Trivandrum.
Camera: Nikon D300+60mm Nikkor +Vivitar ringlflash.
Acording to GRIN author citation is Nepenthes rafflesiana Jack ex Hook. f. Compan. Bot. Mag. 1:270. 1836.
but according to IPNI Nepenthes rafflesiana Jack Malayan Misc. App. Ined. (1823).
Unfortunately I am unable to find either of the protologues.
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Other information [Source: Wwikipedia]
Nepenthes rafflesiana (pronounced /nɨˈpɛnθiːz ræˌfliːziˈɑːnə/, after Stamford Raffles), or Raffles’ Pitcher-Plant, is a species of pitcher plant. It has a very wide distribution covering Borneo, Sumatra, Peninsular Malaysia, and Singapore. N. rafflesiana is extremely variable (second only to N. mirabilis) with numerous forms and varieties described. In Borneo alone, there are at least four distinct varieties. The giant form of this species produces enormous pitchers rivaling those of N. rajah in size.
Nepenthes rafflesiana is a very widespread lowland species. It is common in Borneo and parts of the Riau Archipelago, but has a restricted distribution in both Peninsular Malaysia and Sumatra. It is only widespread in the southeastern region of the Malay Peninsula, particularly in the state of Johor, where it is relatively abundant.
N. rafflesiana has only been recorded from the west coast of Sumatra, between Indrapura and Barus.
N. rafflesiana generally occurs in open, sandy, wet areas. It has been recorded from kerangas forest, secondary formations, margins of peat swamp forest, heath forest, and seaside cliffs. It grows at elevations ranging from sea-level to 1200 m or even 1500 m.
Most wild populations of Nepenthes, including N. rafflesiana, are endangered due to habitat destruction and (to a lesser extent) poaching. N. rafflesiana is currently listed as a CITES Appendix II plant, so it does have some international trade restrictions (though not an outright ban). Today, most N. rafflesiana plants on the market are propagated by plant tissue culture or other forms of vegetative propagation. When purchasing any plant, especially those protected by CITES, it is important to ask the vendor about the plant’s provenance. 


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Fwd: Pitcher Plants 2- 6 : 4 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (1)

Encountered different species of Nepenthes during my sojourn in Sabah & Sarawak – possibly being of the Rajah Brooke’s Pitcher Plant [Nepenthes rajah] – the worlds largest that can hold upto 3.5 litres of water, and am told they were used by locals to steam rice.

Its not easy to make out the size of the pitcher but looks close to Nepenthes rafflesiana var. gigantean

  

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Fwd: Pitcher Plants 2- 1 : 3 posts by 2 authors.

Encountered different species of Nepenthes during my sojourn in Sabah & Sarawak– from … Is anybody aware of expert Sabah & Sarawak Nepenthes for id of these species?

Again this could be Nepenthes rafflesiana.  


Encountered different species of Nepenthes during my sojourn in Sabah & Sarawak

Could be Nepenthes rafflesiana ?


References:


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