Acer rubrum (Red Maple, also known as Swamp, Water or Soft Maple), is one of the most common and widespread deciduous trees of eastern North America. The U.S. Forest service recognizes it as the most common variety of tree in America.[3] The red maple ranges from the Lake of the Woods on the border between Ontario and Minnesota, east to Newfoundland, south to near Miami, Florida, and southwest to east Texas. Many of its features, especially its leaves, are quite variable in form. At maturity it often attains a height of around 15 m (49 ft). It is aptly named as its flowers, petioles, twigs and seeds are all red to varying degrees. Among these features, however, it is best known for its brilliant deep scarlet foliage in autumn.

Over most of its range, red maple is adaptable to a very wide range of site conditions, perhaps more so than any other tree in eastern North America. It can be found growing in swamps, on poor dry soils, and most anywhere in between. It grows well from sea level to about 900 m (3,000 ft).
Due to its attractive fall foliage and pleasing form, it is often used as a shade tree for landscapes. It is used commercially on a small scale for maple syrup production as well as for its medium to high quality lumber.
(From  Wikipedia on 16.1.14) 

 

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Flora of Mississippi, USA-006: Acer rubrum, (Red Maple) a deciduous tree commonly planted here. 

Nice to see it in flower


 

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Tree for ID : Atlanta, Georgia : 16JAN19 : AK-30 : 4 posts by 4 authors. Attachments (4)
Tree seen in Atlanta with the leaves changing color.

Maple?


Yes, may be some Maple species  


With no other information than the photos of leaves, I can say it is most likely an Acer rubrum. If there were images of the bark or the samaras/seed pods it would be most helpful. 

Also, since we are not dealing with trees/plants in the wild, there is a good chance it is a hybrid of some type. 

see my other comment 


 

 
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