IUCN Red List Status: Endangered (EN)
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Angelica glauca Edgew., Trans. Linn. Soc. London 20: 53 1846. (Syn: Angelica nuristanica Kitam.);
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Angelica glauca from Kashmir: Angelica glauca Edgew., Trans. Linn. Soc. London 20:53. 1846
Common name: Smooth Angelica
Perennial herb up to 2 m tall, fistular; leaves 1-2-ternate-pinnate with oval to ovate serrate leaflets, glaucous on lower surface; Umbel compound, rays more than 20 with usually 5 linear bracts, involucel bracts 5-10; flowers white; fruit 8-12 mm long, elliptic to oblong, lateral ridges broadly winged.
Common Himalayan plant, used medicinally.
Photographed from Herbal Garden below Cheshmashahi in Kashmir in August. 

This swollen leaf-sheath, a feature of the family Apiaceae, becomes more prominent in taller plants like Angelica, Heracleum, Ferula etc, and looks more swollen in the subtending leaf  especially when inflorescence is about
to emerge. The shortened leaf below the inflorescence would generally have a prominent leaf sheath, in comparison to leaf blade.


Reference: GBIF specimen


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Apiaceae Fortnight: Angelica glauca from Kashmir-GSJUNE06/12 : 2 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (4)
Angelica glauca Edgew., Trans. Linn. Soc. London 20:53. 1846
Common name: Smooth Angelica
Perennial herb up to 2 m
tall, fistular; leaves 1-2-ternate-pinnate with oval to ovate serrate
leaflets, glaucous on lower surface; Umbel compound, rays more than 20
with usually 5 linear bracts, involucel bracts 5-10;
flowers white; fruit 8-12 mm long, elliptic to oblong, lateral ridges broadly winged.
Common Himalayan plant, used medicinally.
Photographed from Herbal Garden below Cheshmashahi in Kashmir in August.

very interesting esp the winged fruits



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Fwd: Tall Umbellifer in Kokernag Botanical Garden, Kashmir : 4 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (3)

Assisted by Mrs Urvashi Suri, Proprietor of P.Kohli & Co., I made a quick visit to Kokernag Botanical Garden en route to Sinthan Pass during my last time in Kashmir.
A magnificent GIANT umbellifer was growing in one of the beds.
I attach 3 images.
Given that I am looking into Angelicas at present, I would be interested as to which species members of this group consider this to be?

And compare it to other images of Apiaceae posted on eFI.


May I request you to pl. sned large size images with leaves or check at comparative images at Apiaceae


I posted the image as I did for a purpose.
It was designed to attempt to discover whether the fact that it was being grown in a nursery/ botanical garden in Kashmir and its general appearance was sufficient to mean it was DISTINCTIVE enough to be identified with confidence.
In addition, I did not take any close-up images of the foliage, assuming that it would be well-known.  I was in a hurry to reach Sinthan Pass that day, knowing time was going to be strictly limited.
The image attached is the best I can provide.
It would appear that is not the case.
Yet, I have seen NUMEROUS articles published in ‘scientific’ journals about ANGELICA GLAUCA including by Indian Scientists located in S.India who cannot be that familiar with Himalayan flora, who travel CONSIDERABLE distances to write about this species.
How can they be CERTAIN of its identity and SUPPOSED rarity IF it is not easy to tell apart from a number of Umbellifers (Apiaceae)?
One CANNOT rely upon local people. They are not trained in plant identification, so could easily be collecting the wrong plant.
Stewart said that Angelica glauca was COMMON in Kashmir. Flora of Pakistan says similar, so why has it suddenly become ‘Endangered’?
I have no recollection of coming across this species in Kashmir or H.P.  Even if I had, I could easily have taken no notice of it, viewing it of rather ‘weedy’ appearance, unless it was at its maximum of height say 2m, which would have made it more noticeable. This does not mean it is ‘Rare’.
I could easily not have passed through its typical habitat anyhow….
I do not know and cannot see how others have DECIDED it is rare.

Attachments (1)



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at the Botanical Garden, Srinagar, Jammu & Kashmir- 03rd August 2009; Is it Angelica glanca? – indiantreepix | Google Groups


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Apiaceae Fortnight (June 2015):: For id from Chakrata:: NS-03/03 : 3 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (3)
I do not have any habit or vegetative parts pics..
Please help if id can be reached from flowers and fruits, pics again from Chakrata region..


Fruits suggest Angelica, I hope A. glauca


Reference: GBIF specimen



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