Common names: Irish strawberry-tree; strawberry-tree, cane apples

 

Evergreen small tree with oblong to obovate up to 10 cm long leaves, shining above, serrate; flowers white to pinkish, 5-7 mm long, in up to 6 cm long drooping panicles; corolla urceolate; fruit red to orange, nearly globose, up to 4 cm, strawberry-like in appearance.
 
Bark used in tanning. Fruit used in preserves and alcoholic drinks.
 


Arbutus unedo (strawberry tree, occasionally cane apple) is an evergreen shrub or small tree in the family Ericaceae, native to the Mediterranean region and western Europe north to western France and Ireland.

Due to its presence in southwest and northwest Ireland, it is known as either “Irish strawberry tree” or sometimes “Killarney strawberry tree“. 
Arbutus unedo grows to 5–10 m tall, rarely up to 15 m, with a trunk diameter of up to 80 cm. Zone: 7–10
The leaves are dark green and glossy, 5–10 cm (2–4 in) long and 2–3 cm (0.8–1.2 in) broad, with a serrated margin.
The hermaphrodite flowers are white (rarely pale pink), bell-shaped, 4–6 mm diameter, produced panicles of 10–30 together in autumn. They are pollinated by bees.
The fruit is a red berry, 1–2 cm diameter, with a rough surface, maturing 12 months at the same time as the next flowering. The fruit is edible, though many people find it bland and meally; the name ‘unedo’ is explained by Pliny the Elder as being derived from unum edo “I eat one”,[4] which may seem an apt response to the flavour.
Arbutus unedo serves as a bee plant for honey production, and the fruits are food for birds. The fruits are also used to make jams, beverages, and liqueurs (such as the Portuguese medronho, a type of strong brandy). Honey produced has a characteristic bitter taste.[6]
In folk medicine, the plant has been used for antiseptic, astringent, intoxicant, rheumatism, and tonic purposes.[7]
Arbutus unedo is cultivated as an ornamental plant by plant nurseries. It is used as a single or muti-trunked ornamental tree, and as a specimen or hedge shrub in gardens and public landscapes. When grown as a tree rather than a shrub, basal sprouts are kept pruned off. The plant prefers well-drained soils, and low to moderate soil moisture.
(From Wikipedia  on 11.11.14) 

 
041011-MS – 50- – strawberry tree:  Attaching a  photograph of Arbutus unedo,
commonly called Strawberry Tree, Apple of Cain, or Cane Apple.  
Family Ericaceae
Unfortunately, I have only one photograph showing the fruits.  
Habit photo is untraceable, though I remember to have photographed a few. 
Place : San Francisco botanical garden, California.


Yes very commonly grown in California


I think the fruits are edible.   Please see the link :
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Arbutus-unedo/108478749182876


 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Arbutus-unedo-Sunnyvale-DSC07146-California-2.jpg

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Arbutus-unedo-Sunnyvale-DSC05672a-California-3.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Arbutus-unedo-Sunnyvale-DSC04667-California-4.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Arbutus-unedo-Sunnyvale-DSC04066a-California-1.jpg
Arbutus unedo L.
Common names: Irish strawberry-tree; strawberry-tree, cane apples
Evergreen small tree with oblong to obovate up to 10 cm long leaves, shining above, serrate; flowers white to pinkish, 5-7 mm long, in up to 6 cm long drooping panicles; corolla urceolate; fruit red to orange, nearly globose, up to 4 cm, strawberry-like in appearance. 
Commonly planted in California. Bark used in tanning. Fruit used in preserves and alcoholic drinks.


Very interesting species


… correctly identified and photographs are really nice!


 

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/_MG_8288s.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/_MG_8287s.jpg
Some Arctostaphylos species; Stanford University campus.


 

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/_MG_2489s.jpg
Some Arctostaphylos sp.


Again Arbutus unedo


 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/P1290355.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/P1290351.JPG

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/P1290352.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/P1290354.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/P1280538.JPG
Red & Yellow Fruits : Arbutus unedo : California : 04NOV14 : AK-11 : 5 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (5)
Flowers seen in San Francisco, fruits in Fremont.

For validation.


Yes … very common in California.


strawberry tree

 

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/IMG_0190s.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/IMG_0189s.jpg
Some Arctostaphylos species. Planted in garden.


Really Nice!


Is it Arbutus unedo? after observing … post.


arbutus alright

but the fruit even if it is not fully developed does not look like the strawberry red fruits…  and the red flowers are not the A. unedo flowers.. 

cultivar called oktoberfest… of A. unedo., this cultivar has deep pink to red  flowers.
but it would all depend on the whole tree and bark characteristics..
on the other hand it could be  the marina variety… esp. since it seems to me its a low branched one judging from the way someone is holding the fruit..

did you take pictures of the whole tree and the bark…
unedo bark is very unique and marina bark just peels off.
marina is considered a hybrid: between Arbutus unedo and Arbutus andrachne, how did it get pink flowers is anybody’s guess. since both parents I have seen have the similar colored beige -cream flowers.

and bottom of the fruit would be really round, its not really here…


the fruit has bothered me… shape and the bottom surface
could it be still the uva ursi member…
do you by any chance have more data /pictures?


After seeing the upload today, and seeing flowers on the web, I really got confused momentarily, and thought of checking my posts critically, but then description of two genera on Flora and North America and my own pictures from California on our website

and Arbutus unedo
The clue is totally entire leaves, usually hairy on surface, and drupe fruit with smooth surface in Arctostaphylos
Crenate leaf margins, glabrous surface and strawberry like fruit, a berry with tubercled surface.
It is Arbutus unedo without any doubt. 

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/P9230187.jpg

Rosaceae Fortnight: Rosa of Indonesia 3-PW-020915 : 3 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (1)

A kind of Rubus. Id is requested. 


This is Arbutus unedo, of Ericaceae.
I had seen in California.


 
 
 
References:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *