Common names: Rough spike hard grass, Tausch’s goat grass 
 

Tufted annual grass usually less than 40 cm tall, erect or ascending; leaves up to 15 cm long, 3-5 mm broad, sparsely hairy; spike terminal, compact, up to 12 cm long with usually 7-10 spikelets; glumes 4-6 mm long, leathery with truncate or slightly toothed apex, enclosing 3-5 florets;
  
 
 
 
 
 

 /wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Aegilops-tauschii-Dachhigam-IMG_7156-Kashmir-3.jpg

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Aegilops-tauschii-Dachhigam-IMG_7145-Kashmir-2.jpg

The father/mother of common Bread wheat: Aegilops tauschii from Dachhigam, Kashmir: Our common wheat plant Triticum aestivum has a complicated history of origin. In the first step diploid Triticum urartu (till recently considered under T. monococcum) hybridized with possibly Aegilops speltoides and subsequent duplication of chromosomes to yield tetraploid wild emer wheat Triticum dicoccoides. Latter hybridized again with diploid Aegilops tauschii, another duplication of chromosomes to yield hexaploid Triticum aestivum that fills the bellies of people all over the world.
I was fortunate to click this immediate progenitor of wheat growing commonly in Dachhigam forest.
 
Aegilops tauschii Coss., Notes pl. crit. 69. 1850 (“1849”)
syn: Triticum tauschii (Coss.) Schmalh.; Aegilops squarrosa auct. (non L.)

Common names: Rough spike hard grass, Tausch’s goat grass

Tufted annual grass usually less than 40 cm tall, erect or ascending; leaves up to 15 cm long, 3-5 mm broad, sparsely hairy; spike terminal, compact, up to 12 cm long with usually 7-10 spikelets; glumes 4-6 mm long, leathery with truncate or slightly toothed apex, enclosing 3-5 florets;


 
5 images. 3 posts by 2 authors.
Aegilops tauschii Coss., Notes pl. crit. 69. 1850 (“1849”)
syn: Triticum tauschii (Coss.) Schmalh.; Aegilops squarrosa auct. (non L.)

Common names: Rough spike hard grass, Tausch’s goat grass

Our common wheat plant Triticum aestivum has a complicated history of origin. In the first step diploid Triticum urartu (till recently considered under T. monococcum) hybridized with possibly Aegilops speltoides and subsequent duplication of chromosomes to yield tetraploid wild emer wheat Triticum dicoccoides. Latter hybridized again with diploid Aegilops tauschii, another duplication of chromosomes to yield hexaploid Triticum aestivum that fills the bellies of people all over the world.
I was fortunate to click this immediate progenitor of wheat growing commonly in Dachhigam forest.

Tufted annual grass usually less than 40 cm tall, erect or ascending; leaves up to 15 cm long, 3-5 mm broad, sparsely hairy; spike terminal, compact, up to 12 cm long with usually 7-10 spikelets; glumes 4-6 mm long, leathery with truncate or slightly toothed apex, enclosing 3-5 florets;


I also have a wild species of wheat. I will post it saperately.

Please ignore the second image. It is mostly Alyssum.


 
 
 
 
 
 
References:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.