Images
by Gurcharan Singh (Inserted by J.M.Garg)

 

  

 

Malvaceae Week: Sida yunanensis from Delhi Pl validate: Sida yunnanensis Hu, Fl.China,fam. 153.16.t.16.f.7. 1955

I have been working on this plant for some time, similar to what … uploaded as Sida sp. from Panipat and … identified as S. rhomboidea (another but not accepted now name for S. rhombifolia). This interesting plant at first sight appears to be Sida rhombifolia var. obovata as per brief description in Flora of British India. As per eFlora of Pakistan this is a synonym of Sida yunanensis but according to eFlora of China it is a synonym of S. alinifolia var. obovata. Author of eFlora of China was aware of this when he writes “The original author suggested that Sida yunnanensis was related to S. spinosa Linnaeus, but it is distinguished by the broadly elliptic or obovate leaf blades (ovate-lanceolate in S. spinosa), shorter petioles (3-7 mm as opposed to 2-20 mm in S. spinosa), and the absence of the short nodal spines characteristic of S. spinosa. Paul (Fl. India 3: 290. 1993) included S. yunnanensis within S. rhombifolia var. rhombifolia, while Abedin (Fl. W. Pakistan 130: 81. 1979) accepted it and extended it to include material from India, Kashmir, Myanmar, and Pakistan.” 
Now let us understand this plant, the leaves are elliptic-obovate, up to 5 cm long, clearly closely white tomentose beneath especially in plants of dry habitats, leaves more straight at less wrinkled as compared to other species, significantly flowers tend to be occurring in clusters mostly on short axillary branches, calyx is sparcely hairy, flowers yellow about 1 cm across and most importantly in all my specimens carpels are five, the 5 mericarps in fruit have very small (hardly 1 mm) awns closely converging. 
To arrive at better conclusion I tried to identify this plant from keys given in both floras, and in both cases the key led me to S. yunanensis (characterised by leaves up to 5 cm long, broadly elliptic to obovate, flowers in fascicles, mericarps 5 (-7), with less than 2 mm long awns). 
Why it can’t be S. alnifolia var. obovata as per description provided by eFlora of China is that it has smaller than 2 cm leaves, flowers solitary, and 6-8 mericarps. 
The plant was photographed in Vikas Puri, New Delhi, growing in a neglected area in Park. Very common in Delhi. 
Your comments please.


 

 /wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Sida-yunanensis-Vikas%20puri-Delhi-6-9.jpg/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Sida-yunanensis-Vikas%20puri-Delhi-7-8.jpg

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Sida-yunanensis-Vikas%20puri-Delhi-3-4.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Sida-yunanensis-Vikas%20puri-Delhi-2-2.jpg
2 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (13)
Sida yunnanensis Hu, Fl.China,fam. 153.16.t.16.f.7. 1955

I have been working on this plant for some time, similar to what … uploaded as Sida sp. from Panipat and … identified as S. rhomboidea (another but not accepted now name for S. rhombifolia). This interesting plant at first sight appears to be Sida rhombifolia var. obovata as per brief description in Flora of British India. As per eFlora of Pakistan this is a synonym of Sida yunanensis but according to eFlora of China it is a synonym of S. alinifolia var. obovata. Author of eFlora of China was aware of this when he writes “The original author suggested that Sida yunnanensis was related to S. spinosa Linnaeus, but it is distinguished by the broadly elliptic or obovate leaf blades (ovate-lanceolate in S. spinosa), shorter petioles (3-7 mm as opposed to 2-20 mm in S. spinosa), and the absence of the short nodal spines characteristic of S. spinosa. Paul (Fl. India 3: 290. 1993) included S. yunnanensis within S. rhombifolia var. rhombifolia, while Abedin (Fl. W. Pakistan 130: 81. 1979) accepted it and extended it to include material from India, Kashmir, Myanmar, and Pakistan.” 
Now let us understand this plant, the leaves are elliptic-obovate, up to 5 cm long, clearly closely white tomentose beneath especially in plants of dry habitats, leaves more straight at less wrinkled as compared to other species, significantly flowers tend to be occurring in clusters mostly on short axillary branches, calyx is sparcely hairy, flowers yellow about 1 cm across and most importantly in all my specimens carpels are five, the 5 mericarps in fruit have very small (hardly 1 mm) awns closely converging. 
To arrive at better conclusion I tried to identify this plant from keys given in both floras, and in both cases the key led me to S. yunanensis (characterised by leaves up to 5 cm long, broadly elliptic to obovate, flowers in fascicles, mericarps 5 (-7), with less than 2 mm long awns). 
Why it can’t be S. alnifolia var. obovata as per description provided by eFlora of China is that it has smaller than 2 cm leaves, flowers solitary, and 6-8 mericarps. 
The plant was photographed in Vikas Puri, New Delhi, growing in a neglected area in Park. Very common in Delhi. 
Your comments please. 


 

 
 
 
References:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *