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jer-AY-nee-um
— from the Greek geranos, crane; referring to the beak-like fruit
Dave’s Botanary
pray-TEN-see or pray-TEN-say — referring to a meadowDave’s Botanary
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commonly known as: meadow crane’s bill, meadow geranium • Lahauli: porlo • Spiti: likatur
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Native to: Europe, c Asia, n-w Himalaya; naturalized, cultivated elsewhere
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A species very similar in appearance to G. wallichianum but very easily differentiated by very narrow linear stipules, 5-7 lobed leaves more deeply divided, each segment narrower, narrowest towards tip and gradually broader towards base with 6-13 acutish lobes, and narrowed suddenly below the lowest pairs of lobes. the species is now considerd closer to G. himalense but latter has smaller leaves, broader segments with lobes concentrated in upper with 5-7 lobes, mostly lobed again.
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A large flowered species similar to himalayense and G. collinum in general appearance but 5-7 lobed smaller leaves, 3-5 cm across, with narrower segments which are narrowest at apex, narrowly ovate in shape, purple flowers fruiting pedicels erect in fruit, petals 15-20 mm long, fruit with beak less than 3.5 cm long.
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Geranium species from Paddar valley J&K 08: Request for Identification

Kindly identify this Geranium species
Location: Paddar valley J&K
Date: 20th and 17th May 2012
Altitude: 1900 meters and 3000 meters asl respectively
Habit/Habitat: Wild herb

Geranium nepalense ? which I included in Calendar of BSI in 1979
Just check image searchof Google and confirm. Dr Ellis collected it in Valley of flowers but I have it in Sikkim,Nepal-Bhutan. Many Himalayan fls can be identified with Himalayan Fls by Pollunin availabe at IBH or Oxford stn in big cities(Rs 350/) worth it. One without text but with 1000 slidesize pics was Rs 100/only By chance one can get it in Delhi or Calcutta

I think close to images at Geranium pratense L. ?


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Balsaminaceae, Geraniaceae and Oxalidaceae Week:
Geranium collinum Steph. ex Willd., Sp. Pl. 3:705. 1800.
Photographed from Khillenmarg, Kashmir, about 3000 m altitude

These Geraniums with radial symmetry look awesome.


This a replication of the posting immediately above.


To me these images appear similar to those at Geranium pratense from Kashmir


Habitat: sloping meadow
Habit: small herb, about 40 – 60 cm high; flower about 3 – 4 cm across


Not Geranium wallichianum in which stipules are much larger and broader and leaves with less dissected broader segments.

This appears to be Geranium pratense.


Thank you very much … for the ID and clarification.
Am convinced this plant to be Geranium pratense.


I currently cannot put a firm name on this – shall comment further in due course. I am in agreement that this definitely not G.wallichianum.
It does seem to come within the G.collinum-pratense-himalayense complex but is not within what I understand to be G.himalayense from Ladakh. 

In ‘The Valley of Flowers’ book G.pratense, collinum, wallichianum and grevilleanum (now G.lambertii) are listed.  

Let me try to explain.  In the Notes Yeo supplied me, he draws attention to the problematical G.collinum-pratense-himalayense alliance.  He considered this was particularly critical in the NW Himalaya with high quality pressed specimens needed (nowadays these can be supplemented and sometimes replaced by high quality digital images (provided the advice given below is followed).  This alliance has pink to blue flowers (sometimes white) in which the stamen-tip and stigmas are never blackish-purple…
I consider it will be helpful for keen photographers, willing to make an additional effort, to know which parts of Geranium to photograph.  Having images of such parts of each geranium will greatly aid identification and enhance our understanding of the genus in the Himalaya – and perhaps you can help with the locating and identification of a species new-to-science!




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Balsaminaceae, Geraniaceae and Oxalidaceae Week :: DV03 :: 31 JUL – 02 AUG 12 :: Geranium pratense at Auli and Valley of Flowers: Geraniaceae
Geranium pratense L.

jer-AY-nee-um — from the Greek geranos, crane; referring to the beak-like fruitDave’s Botanary
pray-TEN-see or pray-TEN-say — referring to a meadowDave’s Botanary
commonly known as: meadow crane’s bill, meadow geranium • Lahauli: porlo • Spiti: likatur
Native to: Europe, c Asia, n-w Himalaya; naturalized, cultivated elsewhere
References: Flowers of IndiaFlora of ChinaNPGS / GRIN ENVIS – FRLHT
at Valley of Flowers on 02 AUG 12

Of the three Geranium, you have uploaded this morning, this one is very very pretty.


I currently cannot put a firm name on this (the species photographed in the top image, that is) – shall comment further in due course.  The situation is complicated further by the likelihood of more than one Geranium growing here and that both species are in the photos?  The lowest and top images do not, to me, match well. The leaf below the flower shown in the bottom image do not tally with the geranium in the top image. In the 3rd of the smaller images, the lower flower does not match the upper two. I also seem to be able to detect large stipules which suggest one of the two geraniums is Geranium wallichianum – the accompanying flowers and foliage support this – they certainly do not belong to the other Geranium and are not part of the G.colliniumpratense-himalayense alliance (see below).  Auli is certainly at the right sort of altitude to find G.wallichianum. So it seems likely that … photographed two Geraniums, thinking that there was only one.  I have done this with other genera but just goes to show that some geraniums are not easy to recognise. 

In ‘The Valley of Flowers’ book G.pratense, collinum, wallichianum and grevilleanum (now G.lambertii) are listed.  

Let me try to explain.  In the Notes Yeo supplied me, he draws attention to the problematical G.collinum-pratense-himalayense alliance.  He considered this was particularly critical in the NW Himalaya with high quality pressed specimens needed (nowadays these can be supplemented and sometimes replaced by high quality digital images (provided the advice given below is followed).  This alliance has pink to blue flowers (sometimes white) in which the stamen-tip and stigmas are never blackish-purple…
I consider it will be helpful for keen photographers, willing to make an additional effort, to know which parts of Geranium to photograph.  Having images of such parts of each geranium will greatly aid identification and enhance our understanding of the genus in the Himalaya – and perhaps you can help with the locating and identification of a species new-to-science!


 


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References:

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