Claoxylon mercurialis (L.) Thwaites, Enum. Pl. Zeyl. 271. 1861; Hook.f., Fl. Brit. India 5: 412. 1887; Susila & N.P.Balakr. in Rheedea 5(2): 131. 1995. Tragia mercurialis L., Sp. Pl. 980. 1753. Micrococca mercurialis (L.) Benth. in Hook., Niger Fl. 503. 1849; Haines, Bot. Bihar Orissa 2: 116. 1921; Gamble, Fl. Madras 2(7): 1328. 1921 (repr. ed. 2: 929. 1957); Govaerts et al., World Checkl. & Bibl. Euphorbiaceae 3: 1182. 2000. Microstachys mercurialis (L.) Dalzell & A. Gibson, Bombay Fl. 227. 1861. as per Flora of India Vol 23 (Editors N. P. Balakrishnan, T. Chakrabarty, M. Sanjappa, P. Lakshminarsimhan & P. Singh- by Botanical Survey of India (2012)) 
Angola; Bangladesh; Benin; Botswana; Burkina; Cameroon; Central African Repu;
Chad; Congo; Equatorial Guinea; Ethiopia; Gabon; Ghana; Guinea; Guinea-Bissau;
India
; Ivory Coast; Kenya; Laccadive Is.; Liberia; Madagascar; Malawi; Malaya;
Maldives; Mauritania; Mozambique; Myanmar; Nigeria; Saudi Arabia; Senegal;
Sierra Leone; Sri Lanka; Sudan; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; West Himalaya;
Yemen; Zambia; Zare; Zimbabwe
as per Catalogue of Life;
Malayalam Kunukku-thooki

 


Annual herbs. Leaves alternate, 2-4x 1-2.5 cm, ovate or ovate-lanceolate, base rounded, serrate on margins, apex acute or shortly acuminate, puberulous, membranous; petiole to 2.5 cm long. Flowers in interrupted clusters, on axillary racemes, often drooping. Bracts minute. Male flowers minute, c. 1.5 mm across; perianth 1-seriate, 3-lobed, lobes ovate; stamens 3-5, free, with 6-8-ciliate glandular scales between filaments. Female flowers c. 2 mm across; tepals 3, lanceolate, shortly connate; ovary 3-lobed, sparsely pubescent, 3-locular; ovules 3; styles 3; stigma linear, plumose. Capsule 4-5 mm across, 3-lobed, glabrescent. Seeds c. 1mm across, globose, minutely arillate. 

Flowering and fruiting: June-December
Degraded moist deciduous forests and forest plantations, also in the plains 
Tropical Africa, Arabia, India, Sri Lanka and Myanmar

  
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Euphorbiaceae herb ID from Hooghly 22/9/12 SK1: This herb looks somewhat similar to Acalypha indica L. and capsule, though smaller, looks like those of Tragia sp., but it is some other herb growing beside railway tracks.
Species : UNKNOWN
Habit & Habitat : wild herb, height leas than 1 foot
Date : 22/9/12, 1.22 p.m.
Place : Gobra (Hooghly)


Acalypha lanceolata syn. A.indica. for me. There are varieties in this species as I have observed.


This could be Micrococca mercurialis and not as reported by me earlier. Please check for the details The credit goes to my friend …


Thank you very much … and …, found info at – http://www.mozambiqueflora.com/speciesdata/species.php?species_id=134870


Yes, it is Micrococca mercurialis.


Claoxylon mercurialis



 

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Micrococca mercurialis (L.) Benth :  Attachments (1). 4 posts by 3 authors. 

Micrococca mercurialis (L.) Benth.; Fam: Euphorbiaceae

0ctober 2010, altitude around 20 m, Thirukalukundram, Kanchepuram dt, Tamilnadu
Erect slender herb


Excellent photo


Can we have some more information? Is it common or uncommon. Endemic?

Very good post. New to me


Claoxylon mercurialis (L.) Thwaites, Enum. Pl. Zeyl. 271. 1861; Hook.f., Fl. Brit. India 5: 412. 1887; Susila & N.P.Balakr. in Rheedea 5(2): 131. 1995. Tragia mercurialis L., Sp. Pl. 980. 1753. Micrococca mercurialis (L.) Benth. in Hook., Niger Fl. 503. 1849; Haines, Bot. Bihar Orissa 2: 116. 1921; Gamble, Fl. Madras 2(7): 1328. 1921 (repr. ed. 2: 929. 1957); Govaerts et al., World Checkl. & Bibl. Euphorbiaceae 3: 1182. 2000. Microstachys mercurialis(L.) Dalzell & A. Gibson, Bombay Fl. 227. 1861. 
Distrib. India: Generally in humid regions, a weed of cultivation, restricted to moist, shaded gravelly hill slopes, often found in fertile soils of plains, wastelands and in places where city wastes are heaped. Himachal Pradesh, Haryana, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, West Bengal, Orissa, Madhya Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Goa, Karnataka, Kerala, Lakshadweep, Tamil Nadu and Pondicherry.
Tropical Africa, Arabia, Sri Lanka, Myanmar and Thailand. 
Uses. Leaves said to be useful in jaundice. Ash of the plant mixed with oil used in skin diseases. Dye from the fruit used as an anti-oxidant for ghee and vegetable oils. 


 

 

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I thank … for the id of this species


I call it Claoxylon mercurialis (L.) Thwaites based on Tragia mercurialis L.


Thank you Sir for the accepted name.


Actually it is the freedom of an individual to decide which name is to be adopted.


I would also like to call it as you do, it is the very name I found in Bengal Plants.

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Herb for ID, Rajasthan, NAW-SEP16-02 : 3 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (5)
Kindly identify this weedy herb, photographed in August 2016, in Tilonia, Ajmer District, Rajasthan.


It is Micrococca mercurialis (L.) Benth., of Euphorbiaceae


However, the current name is Claoxylon mercurialis.


  

 

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Fwd: Photograph for Identification- 140519TH1 : 7 posts by 4 authors. Attachments (1)- 2 Mb.
Please help me to identify this plant. Picture taken on 12-5-2019 from Rajshahi, Bangladesh.

Claoxylon


Seems to be Micrococca mercurialis

Yes, Micrococca mercurialis


References:

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