cactus pudding,[3] devil’s-root,[3] diabolic-root,[3] divine cactus,[3] dry-whiskey,[3] dumpling cactus,[3] Indian-dope,[3] mescal-buttons,[3] turnip cactus,[3] whiskey cactus,[3] and white-mule.[3]; 

It is native to southwestern Texas and Mexico. 
The various species of the genus Lophophora grow low to the ground and they often form groups with numerous, crowded shoots. The blue-green, yellow-green or sometimes reddish green shoots are mostly flattened spheres with sunken shoot tips. They can reach heights of from 2 to 7 centimeters (0.79 to 2.8 in) and diameters of 4 to 12 centimeters (1.6 to 4.7 in). There are often significant, vertical ribs consisting of low and rounded or hump-like bumps. From the cusp areoles arises a tuft of soft, yellowish or whitish woolly hairs. Spines are absent. Flowers are pink or white to slightly yellowish, sometimes reddish. They open during the day, are from 1 to 2.4 centimeters long, and reach a diameter from 1 to 2.2 centimeters. 
The cactus produces flowers sporadically; these are followed by small edible pink fruit. The club-shaped to elongated, fleshy fruits are bare and more or less rosy colored. At maturity, they are brownish-white and dry. The fruits do not burst open on their own and they are between 1.5 and 2 centimeters long. They contain black, pear-shaped seeds that are 1 to 1.5 mm long and 1 mm wide. The seeds require hot and humid conditions to germinate. (Ref. Wikipedia– 11.3.13); 

 

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Multiple grafted Lophophora’s


I’d say an old Lophophora williamsii (probably caespitosa). It’s probably had several heads popped off for grafting or sharing.


yeah thats the spelling i’m looking for                     


 

 

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Lophophora williamsii : Attachments (1). 4 posts by 3 authors.
Lophophora williamsii,

or peyote as it is commonly named.
As an aside it is used for its psychoactive properties.


A Cactaceae member.

Native to southwestern Texas and Mexico.

Long history of its use for more than 5500 years.


 
   

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