Aquilegia nivalis (Brühl) Falc. ex Munz, Gentes Herb. 7:24. 1946 (Syn: (=) Aquilegia vulgaris subsp. jucunda auct.; (≡) Aquilegia vulgaris subsp. nivalis Brühl (basionym));
 
Common name: Snow Columbine   
 
 

 

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Aquilegia nivalis: a Red Listed Plant Species from Uttarakhand : Attachments (2).  2 posts by 2 authors.
This exclusively Himalayan genus (in India), Aquilegia (popularly known as Columbine) is characterized by five backward projecting spurs. Five species of it occur in India.
Aquilegia nivalis (Baker) Falc. ex B.D.Jacks. (Ranunculaceae) is a rare Himalayan Columbine species and listed in 1997 IUCN Red List of Threatened Plants. It is a small perennial herb with solitary terminal nodding flower in alpine areas of J&K, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand. Though the Flora of India vol-I indicate its distribution only in J&K and Himachal Pradesh, last year we recorded it first time in Valley of Flowers.
Photographed here in Sunderdhunga Valley, Bageshwar district Uttarakhand at an altitude of 3900m.


 
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Ranunculaceae Fortnight: Aquilegia nivalis : 3 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (1). 
Aquilegia nivalis from Kashmir a high-altitude plant mostly in rocky habitat.


I think this probably is A.nivalis but the single image, out-of-focus, of a flower not fully open, makes it difficult to understand the species well.
Once again, no location, actual elevation nor specific habitat information is provided.
I would not describe A.nivalis as a ‘high-altitude’ species nor one found at ‘high-altitudes’.  Species found at say 4500m+ can be considered “high altitude” species.


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RANUNCULACEAE Fortnight: Aquilegia nivalis from Uttarakhand_DSR_Jan 2015_03 : 5 posts by 5 authors. Attachments (1)  

Aquilegia nivalis (Baker) Falc. ex. B.D.Jacks is a rare species in alpine zones of Uttarakhand Himalaya and listed as a threatened species in India.
Photographed in Sunderdhunga valley of Uttarakhand.


Beautiful uploads I think you have very good flower repository of flowers
The plant may be Aquilegia nivalis


 

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Fwd: Aquilegia nivalis in Kashmir : 1 post by 1 author. Attachments (1)

An image scanned in from a slide taken in Kashmir more than 30 years ago.
I disagree with the inclusion of the ‘Snow Columbine’ as a ‘Red List’ species either within India or Internationally (it would only be included as
such if its status had been submitted from India – International bodies/ organisations rely on submissions by National bodies).
Stewart recorded this in Northern Pakistan and Kashmir (from a number of locations) @ 3300-4200m.
Flowers of the Himalaya recorded it from alpine slopes, screes & rocks @ 3-4000m from Pakistan to Himachal Pradesh.  Had it been a scarce plant, it would not have been included in ‘Flowers of the Himalaya’…..
My team easily located this at Vishensar and near Mt. Kolahoi during the Kashmir Botanical Expedition in 1983 – there is even a photograph of it contained within the expedition report. I came across it again during a 1985 visit.
Roy Lancaster reported it from Lashpatri, Vishensar and near Sonamarg during a botanical tour to Kashmir.
N.Robson reported it during a visit to Kashmir in 1971 from above Gulmarg and near Thajewas above Sonamarg.
Surely, if ‘Britishers’ on brief treks can easily locate the species, then this does not support any suggestion of rarity. Yes, these records are decades old but there is nothing to suggest suitable habitat has been compromised in the intervening period.  In fact, pressures on them during that period have actually reduced.
Botanists cannot assess the abundance or rarity of a species found between 3300-4200m in Kashmir unless they undertake extensive surveys at such elevations including scrambling about amongst rocks, boulders and screes. This has not happened.
Species which inhabit places close to habitation are at greater risk of being damaged regardless of any known usage of particular species.


 
 

 

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