Common name: Evergreen Rock Jasmine 
 

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This spreading herb was found almost closed to snow line at approx 12500- 13000 ft on the rocks on the way to Hampta Pass (Manali region).
Flowers were very small in size (few mm).
Date/Time: 27-09-2010 / 01:45PM
Location: On the way to Hampta Pass (Manali region).
Habitat: Wild
Plant Habit: Herb
Could be some Aeonium sp..


It is a little harder to see that how many carpels are there. If two (as I see) it is Saxifraga sp (Saxifragaceae).


Saxifraga  species in eFIoraofindia (with details/ keys from published papers/ regional floras/ FRLHT/ FOI/ efloras/ books etc., where ever available)


Probably the photographs uploaded are Aeonium Sp. (Crassulaceae)


aeonium arboreum cv altopurpureum or aeonium arboreum with winter color changes in outer leaves..
and most likely the fruits …


IMG_1385-7 & IMG_1416 – yes, this is a Saxifraga sp.  The glandular sepals help indicate this.


So … was on the correct tract


AND this is the only specimen that is not the run of the mill succulent taught me a great deal.
though a core eudicot this is not part of the crassulaceae family… but oh so close!!


I thought I had already corrected this mistake (just as I was joining this group) and it has been added to the page covering A.sempervivoides but not removed from here yet.
It is not Aeonium, Rhodiola nor Saxifraga but Androsace sempervivoides.
I am absolutely certain about this. The rosettes of this species which has small runners which help the plant propagate and lends itself to growth in pans, regularly winning prizes on rock garden society show benches in the UK.
The first 3 images show dry & empty fruiting capsules, not flowers. It was photographed at the end of September; it flowers from June to August.
Stewart found this to be common in Kashmir @ 2400-3600m. ‘Flowers of Himalaya’ say Pakistan to HP @ 3000-4000m on alpine slopes. I have seen it on the Rohtang (which is close to Hampta where the above was photographed). 
Flora of Lahaul-Spiti record it from above Khoksar which seems reasonable given its occurrence on the Rohtang (albeit Kulu Valley side).  Stewart does not record it from Ladakh but Dickore & Klimes do but I suspect this would be from a location(s) close to the border with Kashmir as the species is primarily a NW Himalayan species requiring more moisture than most of borderlands of W.Tibet.
I do have an image of it growing in a trough in cultivation in the UK but not necessary to post this as the images above can be compared with images of the species correctly identified already posted on this site, see:
Androsace sempervivoides from Himachal [Kullu, 3000 m asl]


Beautiful rock jasmine of Himalaya.


Very nice pictures.” காண கண் கோடி வேண்டும்” -Need one crore eyes to appreciate their beauty.


After going through Primula, I am now checking Androsace, starting with the species I am most familiar with.
This is correctly identified. I first go to know this is Kashmir where it is common @ 2400-3600m then on the Rohtang. ‘Fls of Himalaya’ say Pakistan to Himachal Pradesh @ 3000-4000m.  I seem to recollect it is found near the top of Rohtang (which is 3900m) as well as lower down.  It is recorded above Khoksar in Lahoul which is quite feasible since it is on the Rohtang and apparently from Ladakh but this is a new record to me.


 

 

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This herb with leaves in rosettes, without any flowers, I am not sure whether it is a member of Crassulaceae or more likely Androsace sp. Please help in resolving.


I second your thought, this looks more like Androsace


Thank you … I was also more inclined towards Androsace

I hope Androsace sempervivoides


as far as I know one would need to see flowers or diligent dissection.

Flowers is less violent way but how often do they flower?


This is correctly identified. I first go to know this is Kashmir where it is common @ 2400-3600m then on the Rohtang. ‘Fls of Himalaya’ say Pakistan to Himachal Pradesh @ 3000-4000m. I seem to recollect it is found near the top of Rohtang (which is 3900m) as well as lower down.  It is recorded above Khoksar in Lahoul which is quite feasible since it is on the Rohtang and apparently from Ladakh but this is a new record to me.


ID request-101010-PKA3 : 15 posts by 7 authors. Attachments (4)
This spreading herb was found almost closed to snow line at approx 12500- 13000 ft on the rocks on the way to Hampta Pass (Manali region). Flowers were very small in size (few mm).
Date/Time: 27-09-2010 / 01:45PM
Location: On the way to Hampta Pass (Manali region).
Habitat: Wild
Plant Habit: Herb


Crassulaceae
I have seen this but not in flowers.. Looks similar to one of the
ornamental ones called Aeonium


sempervivum Fam. Crassulaceae…??

I know it under the german name Hauswurz.


I am suspecting it to be from the genus Rhodiola


Looks like wild Aeonium sps.


Any possibility of this to be Saxifraga paniculata minima????


Today you seem to be hitting the jackpot. Seemingly two carpels do suggest Saxifraga. saxifraga paniculata to my knowledge is not reported from India. The petals (if I am not wrong) seem to be hard, persistent and recurved at tip. Looks unusual to me. Let us explore further.


For me it looks like Aeonium sp. Compares well with the photograhs showning toptropicals.comPl see the Link:     http://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/aeonium_sp.htmNevertheless, experts may decide its ID taking a second look.


The plant is definitely Androsace sempervivoides showing fruit capsules. This species is common on the Rohtang – which is close to Hampta. 

efi threadshows the plant in flower, with foliage just visible


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Observed this sp. hopefully from Primulaceae. in Spiti valley and also in Pangot.

I think this is Androsace sarmentosa


It can be difficult to distinguish between A.sarmentosa and A. studiosorum but this is neither. It is Androsace sempervivoides. There is no mention of this species in Spiti within the ‘Flora of Lahaul-Spiti’ but as the authors did not cover much ground in Spiti this comes as no surprise. They record it from above Khoksar in Lahoul (which is just across the Rohtang, where the plant is common). 


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Fwd: Androsace sempervivoides growing in New England : 1 post by 1 author. Attachments (4)

Further to my recent postings about Androsace, I am sharing a few images of Androsace sempervivoides growing in a private garden in New England.
I was on a lecture tour (mostly to North American Rock Garden Society chapters) which provided the opportunity for me to spend some time in the herbaria of the New York Botanical Garden (when speaking to the Manhattan Chapter) and Ann Arbor, Michigan (when speaking to the Great Lakes Chapter, NARGS and gave a seminar at the University about the ‘Himalayan Travels of Walter Koelz’ who with Thakur Rup Chand from Lahoul and their local collectors made extensive collections in the NW Himalaya including Kulu Valley, Lahoul & Ladakh in the 1930s; Koelz was a zoologist engaged by Russian NIcholas Roerich for the Urusvati Institute at Naggar, Kulu Valley and pressed a Kohli Memorial Gold Medal to the Herbarium, see: https://sites.google.com/a/shpa.org.uk/main/kohli-memorial-gold-medals (scroll down to 2011). 
Duplicate sets of pressed specimens collected for Roerich went to Ann Arbor and the New York Botanical Garden, where they were subsequently identified and labelled by Dr Ralph Stewart after he retired from being Principal of the Gordon College, Rawalpindi.  Stewart, whilst working in Pakistan regularly visited the New York Botanic Garden Herbarium.
The best quality set of pressed specimens (with good field notes) I know of the flora of upper Kulu Valley and Lahoul anywhere in the world are at Ann Arbor, Michigan – far better than Kew or the Natural History Museum in London.   What a shame that the duplicate set of these lies, abandoned for 80 years “behind-the-scenes” at the Urusvati Institute – no doubt many of the thousands of specimens have rotted away or become infested by insects.
What a waste of such a hard-won resource.  I have tried, on 3 occasions, to gain access to what is left of the specimens to undertake an initial assessment but have not been permitted entry……
This saddens me.  Those is a senior position should have done something about it decades ago!



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