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SK116SEP29-2016:ID : 7 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (5) 

Sharing some pictures for ID shot at Nubra Valley on 21 August 2016.
Is it some sort of wild Jeera or Saunf??


Would have helped to be able to see foliage, particularly at base.  “Saunf” (Foeniculum vulgare) is cultivated on the plains to 2100m but not in Ladakh – I do not think there is a wild equivalent here.  Likewise “Jeera” (Cyminum cymium) is sparingly cultivated in gardens at lower levels but not Ladakh.  Again, I do not know of a wild equivalent.
It is certainly Apiaceae (formerly Umbelliferae) family.  I am speculating a bit but wonder about Carum carvi (‘Caraway’) which is very common in damp places in Ladakh to 4200m. Occurs in W.Himalaya as forma gracile.  Can anyone confirm this or suggest different? Apiaceae are often not easy to be sure about.


Some Trachyspermum ??


I think does not match with images of Carum carvi as per images herein
Appears close to flowers of Trachyspermum species as per images herein.
Pl. also check with comparative images at Apiaceae


Sorry ! Could not!


I just remembered the scent was  something like Cumin, 
I guess it may be Carum carvi Linnaeus, Sp.
OK.  Scents/smells can be so important in confirming identifications in Apiaceae (Umbelliferae) but without views of foliage and close-ups of mature fruits then difficult to do more than speculate. 


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