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SK326JAN17-2017:ID : 7 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (9)

Location: Suryabinayak,Bhaktapur, Nepal
Altitude:  5000 ft.
Date: 14 January 2017


Brassicaceae member ?


Yes it looks like but could not close in to the correct ID.


This does seem to be a Brassica.  I cannot avoid saying that the photos are not good – indeed some are completely out-of-focus with none in close-up.  This makes identification more difficult.
Having said that, this does appear like a ‘weed’ which has ‘escaped’ from cultivation, as frequently happens with many Brassicas in different parts of the world incl. the UK.
The Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal lists 13 taxa belonging to 5 species within the genus.
All the species present in Nepal are recorded from the UK and using a key from ‘The New flora of the British Isles’ (hoping it applies to material in Nepal), 3 species are separated on the basis of stem-leaves being distinctly clasping the stem at base.  I have not found Brassicas always easy to tell apart in the UK.
They are Brassica oleracea, B.napus & B.rapaOf these, the most likely is B.rapa, commonly known as ‘Turnip’ but I am from from sure about this.  This has 3 varieties in Nepal: var. dichotoma – which is cultivated in India & Nepal for oil; var. quadrivalvis – cultivated in India & Nepal; var. trilocularis – cultivated in Nepal, Himalaya and Assam.
The Plant List has an alarming number of synonyms for B.rapa!
Not sure how to distinguish between these and even if I had notes/a key, whether the images taken show sufficient detail is another matter. 
As this is likely to prove to be an “escape from cultivation” only, I do NOT consider any more time is justified on this – especially as the photos are inadequate.  IF there is someone with expertise in the genus Brassica, then perhaps they will be in a position to comment with authority.


Agree due to unfriendly circumstances and precarious slope.


Pl. check comparative images at Brassica


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