Cotoneaster brandisii G.Klotz, 537 1966 (syn: Pyrus brandisii (G. Klotz) M. F. Fay & Christenh.);
India (Uttar Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh, Tamil Nadu), Jammu & Kashmir as per Catalogue of Life;

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C.brandisii G.Klotz from Churdhar : 1 post by 1 author. Attachments (2)
Cotoneaster microphyllus
Churdhar (The Chor), Sirmaur  H.P.
Altitude: Approx. 2800m
26 May 2015
These plants were more upright and woody.
I am posting different populations separately.


Let me begin with images 4 & 5. According to Jeanette Fryer whilst this is part of the MICROPHYLLI Section, it is NOT Cotoneaster microphyllus. It is C.brandisii G.Klotz which is new to eFI. This species has been recorded from H.P., Uttarakhand and Kashmir.  It does not appear to be common, although is seen in cultivation mistakenly labelled as C.marginatus or C.integrifolius.  It was also collected in the Nilgiri Hills of Tamil Nadu.


C.brandisii G.Klotz which is new to eFI- 031116AT2 :  1 post by 1 author. Attachments (2)
Cotoneaster microphyllus
Churdhar (The Chor), Sirmaur  H.P.
Altitude: Approx. 2800m
26 May 2015
These plants were more upright and woody.
I am posting different populations separately.


Let me begin with images 4 & 5. According to Jeanette Fryer whilst this is part of the MICROPHYLLI Section, it is NOT Cotoneaster microphyllus. It is C.brandisii G.Klotz which is new to eFI. This species has been recorded from H.P., Uttarakhand and Kashmir.  It does not appear to be common, although is seen in cultivation mistakenly labelled as C.marginatus or C.integrifolius.  It was also collected in the Nilgiri Hills of Tamil Nadu.



 

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Cotoneaster microphyllus 2 AT NOV 2016/02 : 4 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (3)
Cotoneaster microphyllus
Churdhar (The Chor), Sirmaur  H.P.
Altitude: Approx. 2800m
26 May 2015
These plants were more upright and woody.
I am posting different populations separately.


Attachments (2)


Let me begin with images 4 & 5.   According to Jeanette Fryer whilst this is part of the MICROPHYLLI Section, it is NOT Cotoneaster microphyllus.  It is C.brandisii G.Klotz which is new to eFI.

This species has been recorded from H.P., Uttarakhand and Kashmir.  It does not appear to be common, although is seen in cultivation mistakenly labelled as C.marginatus or C.integrifolius.  It was also collected in the Nilgiri Hills of Tamil Nadu.


To me appears close to images at Cotoneaster brandisii G.Klotz


 

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Cotoneaster microphyllus from Deovan Road Chakrata


I am beginning a check on Cotoneasters posted on this site. Unfortunately, I suspect a majority are misidentified. Will be sending available images to Jeanette Fryer (on a CD she does not use e-mail). She was co-author with the late Bertil Hylmo of ‘Cotoneasters’ (2009) – the most knowledgeable person on the genus.  She is always busy with other identification tasks so will certainly take weeks perhaps months before we hear but worth the wait. 

Please note her comments: “Klotz included within C.microphyllus a number of taxa from a wide area ranging from W.Himalaya, Kumaon, through to eastern Tibet and the provinces of Yunnan & Sichuan but in its strictest sense C.microphyllus has only been recorded from Nepal.  More research is desperately needed. 

I hope her determinations (accurate identifications) will encourage members to take a greater interest in this neglected genus, photographing more species.   There is every possibility of locating species new to science within this genus. 

It makes sense, when those with specialist knowledge are available to name material to take full advantage.  The present situation with the naming of Cotoneaters in Indian herbaria is in need of improvement.  Many specimens are very old and/or in poor condition, of a scrappy nature in the first place


I feel these images are more closer to images and discussions at Cotoneaster thymifolius hort. ex Baker 


On further checking, I feel Chakrata plant being woody, may be more closer to … images at Cotoneaster brandisii G.Klotz


 

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Cotoneaster microphyllus Wall. ex Lindl.
Common name: Small leaf cotoneaster
Small evergreen shrub from Himalayas with dense spreading branches; leaves usually less than 1 cm long, shining above, gray-tomentose beneath; flowers white, solitary or 2-3 together; fruit brighr red, 5-6 mm. Photographed from Mussoorie Chakrata road on September 16, 2011

 

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These are mine, one from near Hotel Himalayan Paradise, Chakrata and other (in flower) from Chkrata-Deoban road. 2 images.


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Mines Sir from Chakrata. 2 images.


I am beginning a check on Cotoneasters posted on this site. Unfortunately, I suspect a majority are misidentified. Will be sending available images to Jeanette Fryer (on a CD she does not use e-mail). She was co-author with the late Bertil Hylmo of ‘Cotoneasters’ (2009) – the most knowledgeable person on the genus.  She is always busy with other identification tasks so will certainly take weeks perhaps months before we hear but worth the wait. 

Please note her comments: “Klotz included within C.microphyllus a number of taxa from a wide area ranging from W.Himalaya, Kumaon, through to eastern Tibet and the provinces of Yunnan & Sichuan but in its strictest sense C.microphyllus has only been recorded from Nepal.  More research is desperately needed. 

I hope her determinations (accurate identifications) will encourage members to take a greater interest in this neglected genus, photographing more species.   There is every possibility of locating species new to science within this genus. 

It makes sense, when those with specialist knowledge are available to name material to take full advantage.  The present situation with the naming of Cotoneaters in Indian herbaria is in need of improvement.  Many specimens are very old and/or in poor condition, of a scrappy nature in the first place


I feel these images are more closer to images and discussions at Cotoneaster thymifolius hort. ex Baker 


On further checking, I feel Chakrata plant being woody, may be more closer to … images at Cotoneaster brandisii G.Klotz


 

Cotoneaster microphyllus Wall. ex Lindl.
Common name: Small leaf cotoneaster
Small evergreen shrub from Himalayas with dense spreading branches; leaves usually less than 1 cm long, shining above, gray-tomentose beneath; flowers white, solitary or 2-3 together; fruit brighr red, 5-6 mm.
Photographed from Mussoorie Chakrata road on September 16, 2011 


Sir, really Nice photographs!!


I am beginning a check on Cotoneasters posted on this site. Unfortunately, I suspect a majority are misidentified. Will be sending available images to Jeanette Fryer (on a CD she does not use e-mail). She was co-author with the late Bertil Hylmo of ‘Cotoneasters’ (2009) – the most knowledgeable person on the genus.  She is always busy with other identification tasks so will certainly take weeks perhaps months before we hear but worth the wait. 

Please note her comments: “Klotz included within C.microphyllus a number of taxa from a wide area ranging from W.Himalaya, Kumaon, through to eastern Tibet and the provinces of Yunnan & Sichuan but in its strictest sense C.microphyllus has only been recorded from Nepal.  More research is desperately needed. 

I hope her determinations (accurate identifications) will encourage members to take a greater interest in this neglected genus, photographing more species.   There is every possibility of locating species new to science within this genus. 

It makes sense, when those with specialist knowledge are available to name material to take full advantage.  The present situation with the naming of Cotoneaters in Indian herbaria is in need of improvement.  Many specimens are very old and/or in poor condition, of a scrappy nature in the first place


I feel these images are more closer to images and discussions at Cotoneaster thymifolius hort. ex Baker  


On further checking, I feel Chakrata plant being woody, may be more closer to … images at Cotoneaster brandisii G.Klotz



 

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October,09 Chakrata- near Deharadun; Red coloured fruit – efloraofindia | Google Groups

 

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Kindly identify this plant photographed at a meadow on Ganjipahari above Dalhousie, Himachal Pradesh in May 2017. The plant is probably stunted by repeated browsing.


A rosaceae member. Cotonoester? Pl. Check the spelling. 


Cotoneaster ? 


Cotoneaster almost certainly, species not sure.


Yes, it is Cotoneaster sp.

Earlier, I considered similar looking Cotoneaster as C. microphyllus.
But after detailed account given by Chadwell ji, and identification by Prof. Jennet Fryer, non of my species was found to be C. microphyllus. My samples were identified as two different species, one not even reported in the Flora of H.P. 
I am not able to differentiate between these species even today as I have no taxonomic account of these species with me.
… can help you with specific ID.


I feel being woody, appears closer to … images at Cotoneaster brandisii G.Klotz


 

References:

Catalogue of Life  efi thread  The Plant List Ver.1.1  IPNI
 Catalogue of Life  (syn. of Cotoneaster integrifolius (Roxb.) Klotz) GBIF (syn. of Cotoneaster integrifolius (Roxb.) Klotz)

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