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Musk Larkspur • Hindi: मखोटी Makhoti • Urdu: मुश्क दाना Mushk Dana, गुले मामून Gul-e-Mamoon • Nepali: विषादि घाँस Bishadi ghans;
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Herbs, perennial, 10 – 27 cm high, rootstock woody, stems erect, pubescent – hairy, glandular, leafy. Leaf 2.0 – 3.0 x 6.0 – 7.0 cm, reniform, hairy below at veins and margins, 3-5-fid or partite, crenate – dentate; petioles sheathed at base. Inflorescence a few flowered raceme. Sepals petaloid, dark blue – violet, membranous, persistent, veined, pubescent with soft white hairs; upper sepals 2.5 – 3.0 x 1.5 – 2.0 cm, spurred; spurs almost 0.6 – 0.7 x 0.4 – 0.5 cm, straight, saccate; lateral sepals 1.8 – 2.0 x 0.7 – 0.9 cm, ovate. Petals black; upper petals 1.2 – 1.5 cm long, oblique, apex subentire, retuse, ciliate, spurred; spurs 1.0 – 1.1 x 0.1 – 0.2 cm, hairy; lower petals strongly oblique. Stamens numerous, 0.7 – 0.8 cm long, winged from base to middle, glabrous. Carpels 4, 0.4 – 0.5 cm long, pubescent.
Fl. & Fr.: July – September.    
Distrib.: India: Jammu & Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand; Pakistan; Nepal; Afghanistan, China (Tibet).
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Ranunculaceae Week: Sending photo of Delphinium brunonianum
Delphinium brunonianum Royle, Illustr. Bot. Himal. 56.1834; Hook. f. & Thoms. in Hook. f., Fl. Brit. India 1: 27. 1872; Stewart in Ann. Cat. Vas. Pl. W. Pakistan Kashmir 266. 1972; Kachroo et al., Fl. Ladakh. 45. 1977; Rau in Sharma et al., Fl. India 1: 86. 1993; Uniyal in Singh et al., Fl. Jammu  Kashmir 1: 401. 2002.
Herbs, perennial, 10 – 27 cm high, rootstock woody, stems erect, pubescent – hairy, glandular, leafy. Leaf 2.0 – 3.0 x 6.0 – 7.0 cm, reniform, hairy below at veins and margins, 3-5-fid or partite, crenate – dentate; petioles sheathed at base. Inflorescence a few flowered raceme. Sepals petaloid, dark blue – violet, membranous, persistent, veined, pubescent with soft white hairs; upper sepals 2.5 – 3.0 x 1.5 – 2.0 cm, spurred; spurs almost 0.6 – 0.7 x 0.4 – 0.5 cm, straight, saccate; lateral sepals 1.8 – 2.0 x 0.7 – 0.9 cm, ovate. Petals black; upper petals 1.2 – 1.5 cm long, oblique, apex subentire, retuse, ciliate, spurred; spurs 1.0 – 1.1 x 0.1 – 0.2 cm, hairy; lower petals strongly oblique. Stamens numerous, 0.7 – 0.8 cm long, winged from base to middle, glabrous. Carpels 4, 0.4 – 0.5 cm long, pubescent. 
Fl. & Fr.: July – September.
Abundant, in glacial moraines, Manjkeo, Hemis National Park, Ladakh 
Distrib.: India: Jammu & Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand; Pakistan; Nepal; Afghanistan, China (Tibet).


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flower for id mm5 25062011:  These photographs were taken in july 2008 during a trip to ladakh.
This particular flower is from Nubra valley, growing very close to tanglangla.



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Another Delphinium: Plz help in ID of this sp.
Perhaps Delphinium cashmerianum
Vishen Sar, Sonamarg (3600 m alt)

I think, this it is Delphinium brunonianum


I think yes … is right.



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Delphinium sp from Paddar valley J&K 200112 SRANA: Request for Identification.

Kindly identify this Delphinium species.

Location: Paddar valley district Kishtwar J&K
Date: 7th August 2011

Altitude: 5100 meters asl near a glacier


This is more likely D. brunonianum to me


I will also go with Sir Ji’s choice for this ID



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Delphinium brunonianum from Paddar valley J&K: Botanical name: Delphinium brunonianum

Family: Ranunculaceae
Location: Paddar Valley J&K
Date: 6th August 2011

Altitude: 4200 meters asl


In fact Delphinium brunonianum and D. cashmerianum confuse me always

This is how Fl. Pakistan separates them
upper sepal 15-20 mm long, stout plant 40-100 cm tall, flowers many……………………..D. vestitum
upper sepal 20-30 mm long, Plants glandular at least in upper part, petals not blackish, spur 12-14 mm long…..D. brunonianum

Plants not glandular in upper part, petal blackish, spur-8-11 mm long………………..D. cashmerianum


If we go by Flowers of Himalayas your plant resembles D. cashmerianum more.


Thanks a lot Sir for the key. I have another plant I hope D. cashmerianum. I will upload it in other thread.


It would be really great and help in final confirmation.


Checking at the description and photographs on the net I find there is lot of mix up between D. brunonianum, D. cashmerianum and D. vestitum. Even the plant depicted in Flowers of Himalayas as D. cashmerianum does seem to have leaves much different than found typically in D. cashmerianum

Not the Photograph of Flowers of Himalayas but description seems to match this plant of D. cashmerianum (which says it resembles D. brunonianum but differs in not being glandular hairy in upper parts and smaller less inflated flowers mostly 2-3 cm)
Your plant in that respect seems to be correctly identified as D. cashmerianum in your another mail (although flowers are fairly large in your plant).
As far as your above plant is concerned, yes the leaves seem to match D. brunonianum (and D. cashmerianum of Flowers of Himalaya)
but the only concern is your plant seems to be much taller. D. brunonianum is supposed to be always shorter than 30 cm.

Your D. viscosum does resemble the species in its smaller flowers and strongly rigidly hairy plants. It, however, as pointed out earlier is not typical specimen, which should have several flowers in a typical racemes. Your seems to have just two. Perhaps you may be able to locate more typical specimens in future.


Thanks a lot for providing the complete details.

Since I am still not able to compare the descriptions correctly with plants so in case of these plants I have tried to differentiate the species on the basis of altitude. The plant written as D. brunonianum is found above 4000 meters asl in our area whereas the D. cashmerianum is mostly found below 4000 meters asl. Both these plants are common in our area and are used by transhumants for various religious ceremonies. The third plant is very rare and found only this single plant which was in young stage at that time. I have another Delphinium plant which I found only above 5000 meters asl. I am posting it on other thread.



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Please identify: Please identify the plant, snap taken at alpine Sikkim, is it Delphinium brunonianum Family: Ranunculaceae (tibetan larkspur)?


Yes it is D. brunonianum.



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Delphinium brunonianum ??—- en-route Dhel Pass – GHNP – PKA51 : 7 posts by 6 authors. Attachments (8)

Seen this beautiful herb en-route Dhel Pass at an altitude of approx. 3600m.
Bot. name: Delphinium brunonianum ??
Family: Ranunculaceae.
Date/Time: 28-09-2014 / 09:30AM


Not able to confirm the species.

In Uttarakhand we found this species only above 4400m, usually in scree slopes.


According to Flora of Kullu District by Dhaliwal and Sharma, it may be Delphinium cashmeriana.


I fear we have a mixture of D. brunonianum and D. cashmerianum here. Number 3 with glandular hairs and 7 with deeply divided closely deeply crenate leaves suggest D. brunonianum. 4, 5, 6 look like D. cashmerianum. Perhaps population based distinction of photographs by … may help.



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SK223JUN29-2016:ID : 5 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (3)

Enclosing some pictures for identification/verification. Delphinium  …..  ??
Location : Khardung La
Altitude : 5000 m

Date: 24 August 2014


Delphinium species in eFloraofindia (with details/ keys from published papers/ regional floras/ FRLHT/ FOI/ Biotik/ efloras/ books etc., where ever available on net)


Delphinium brunonianum


Nepali Names : विषादी घाँस Vishaadee Ghaans/ माउरेमुलो Maauremulo/ कस्तुरी फूल Kasturee Phool



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SK22JUN29-2016:ID : 6 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (2)
Enclosing some pictures for identification/ verification. Is it Delphinium cashmerianum ??
Location : Khardung La
Altitude : 5000 m

Date: 24 August 2014


or D. brunonianum  ??


It does not match with images at Delphinium cashmerianum 


I currently consider all Delphiniums from the high passes in Ladakh to be within Delphinium brunonianum – though they except considerable variation!  So your images come within this.
I consider the image labelled as D.cashmerianum in ‘Flowers of the Himalaya’ photographed on Baralacha La comes within D.brunonianum.   This book is of a high standard but inevitably a few mistakes crept in (which I shall share at a later stage).
As for the image in that book labelled as D.brunonianum photographed in Dolpo, Nepal not only bears no resemblance to forms of what I understand to be D.brunonianum in Ladakh, but may be a different species or variant at least.
Always wondering about species of any genus found the whole length of the Himalaya, whether, when studied further do not turn out to vary at variety, subspecies or even species level.
Stewart commented within “An Annotated Catalogue of the Vascular Plants of Pakistan & Kashmir” about D.brunonianum:  “very common and very variable in the morainal zone @ 3300-4800m.
about D.cashmerianum: “common and variable at high levels. Sometimes approaches D.brunonianum, possibly because of hybridisation. 2700-4800m
I have an understanding of definite D.cashmerianum close to villages (irrigated areas) at lower levels in Ladakh.
I do not consider I have seen it on the high passes but what about in between?  Similarly, I have not seen what I understand to be D.brunonianum at lower levels.

I consider this needs further investigation.


Neglected to observe that my understanding is that D.cashmerianum flowers are more open, foliage much more dissected with more rounded lobes.  ‘Flowers of the Himalaya’ describes D.brunonianum flowers as “inflated”, its leaf lobes toothed.



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Following advice from …, it has been decided that members will be able to view the images I submit better, if I re-size them as ‘Large Documents’ rather than compress, as I was doing previously.
As a ‘Britisher’ I am marking the festive period in the UK by sending images of selected plants from: Part I Kashmir; Part II Ladakh; Part III Himachal Pradesh; Part IV Nepal to celebrate the mountain flora of the Himalaya – and, hopefully, inspire members to take LOTS of photos of Himalayan plants during 2017.  Especially, as in my present circumstances, I cannot afford to travel to the Himalaya to take any more shots myself!
See attached images taken beyond the Chang La at some 5000m in Ladakh a few years ago.
Stewart found this to be very common and very variable in the morainal zone of N.Pakistan, Kashmir & Ladakh.
May I also take this opportunity of acknowledging … and all those who contribute to eFI.  This project seems to me to very much be in line with the admirable sentiment’s of India’s first Prime Minister inscribed below his statue in Manali, H.P.
…………………

The world would be a better place if every nation and individual citizen of the world adopted such an approach…..


Thank you … for these beautiful images shot at a formidable height of 5000m.



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about 18000ft near Khardungla pass– 9th sept, 2009; around 12-14,000ft asl.;  Is this a variant of larkspur? – efloraofindia | Google Groups Leh plants – indiantreepix | Google Groups


References:

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