Fragaria nubicola (Hook. f.) Lindl. ex Lacaita, J. Linn. Soc., Bot. 43(293): 467-468 467 1916. (syn. Fragaria vesca var. nubicola Hook. f.);
.
Himalayan Strawberry • Nepali: भुई ऐंसेलु Bhui ainselu;
.

Appressed calyx lobes (almost touching fruit) are distinctive for F. nubicola (Stems and petioles are also appressed hairy)

In F. vesca they are spreading as also stems and petioles are with spreading hairy
.
As per Flora of China:
F. daltoniana: Sepals reflexed in fruit; plants not taller than 6 cm; epicalyx oblong with 2-3 lobed apex
F. nubicola: Sepals appressed in fruit; plants up to 25 cm tall; epicalyx segments lanceolate, acuminate at tip
.

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Fragaria vesca from Kashmir: Fragaria vesca from Kashmir, generally growing at lower altitudes, separable from high altitude species F. nubicola in its spreading pubescence and elongated fruit, larger leaves and flowers.

Photographed from Tangmarg on June 19, 2010. 


– Nice catch of the alpine strawberry


Fruits are delicious and eaten raw.


– no idea what fragaria vesca is but i recognise this from my childhood in switzerland and it surely is the flower of a woodland strawberry !


– You are absolutely right. A very common plant on mountain slopes of temperate and subalpine regions.


– i am not sure i will ever travel again to collect a photo of such a lovely plant though… let alone pluck the strawberry itself — every emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere is associated with loss of species as they cannot move fast enough to keep up with increased warming — one is simply in awe of the immense diversity of species as it evolved over the millenia years — we were truely a lucky generation to have the opportunity to witness this magnificence.


– This indeed Fragaria vesca woodland strawberry !! I have also seen them in eastern himalayas


– referring to “separable from high altitude species F. nubicola in its spreading pubescence and elongated fruit”–  there were definitely two distinct types even in the low parts of switz where i remember them from – it must be F. vesca then that has the beautiful conical fruit, sweeter than the elongated one — and the birds and snails always quick to get to them – the elongated ones always seemed a bit harder and left alone by the competition — probably because they never seemed to be really ripe.
but i do not have any photos of either 🙂 really amazing that these alpine plants are found in all places where conditions are similar. well. i guess natural and a matter of fact for botanists. wonderful to think about for us civilians. 🙂 and even more
wonderful still for anyone who can find and eat one ! 🙂


Taking it as Fragaria nubicola in view of discussions in another thread.



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Strawberry from Nilgiris: Name: Fragaria chiloensis (L.) Duchesne
Family Rosaceae
English: Strawberry

Date: 10 April 2011
Place: Kothagiri town, The Nilgiris, TN

On second thought, I think it is F. vesca as scapes are much longer than leaves.


Thanks for showing the lead … sir; and the flowers here are white.

Local people said that this creeper is a weed in garden.

Fragaria vesca does have white flowers


Can they be eaten?


yes for sure


Taking it as Fragaria nubicola in view of discussions in another thread.



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frag-AY-ree-uh — from the Latin for strawberry
VES-kuh — thin or small
[image: Fragaria vesca]<>
Jun 2, 2008 … Manali – Rohtang
commonly known as: Alpine strawberry, European strawberry, small-fruited strawberry, wild strawberry, woodland strawberry
Native to: Northern America, Europe, temperate regions of Asia

Taking it as Fragaria nubicola in view of discussions in another thread.


.

Fragaria vesca, commonest ground herb in pastures and forests in Kashmir.
Photographed from Gulmarg, Kashmir.

I have seen this herb at Pahalagaon and believe it is wild.


Taking it as Fragaria nubicola in view of discussions in another thread.



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Fragaria from Paddar valley J&K.:

Kindly confirm the plant ID
Fragaria vesca
Family: Rosaceae
Date: 2nd August 2011.
Location: Paddar valley district Kishtwar J&K.
Altitude: 3700 meters asl.
Plant height: 20-30 cms

Plant habit/habitat: Wild herb


Taking it as Fragaria nubicola in view of discussions in another thread.



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Family: Rosaceae
Date: 25th May
Place: Haripurdhar-Nohradhar Route, Himachal Pradesh

Habit: Herb
Altitude: 2000 metres above sea level


Fragaria vescaWild strawberry a delicious wild fruit.


There was lot of discussions recently whether it should be Fragaria vesca or Fragaria nubicola as per thread


In addition to the species listed in eFI at least one more species is distributed in HP (provided GRIN is correct) –  (TPL thinks unresolved).

This species is unlikely to be F. daltoniana (epicalyx is not lobed at apex; leaflets should be petiolulate; stamens not numerous).
I fail to find anything relating to F. bucharica. It should be similar to F. rubicola.

It is practically impossible for me (who have never seen any member of the genus) to guess/select one from vesca and rubicola. Inflorescence shows presence of bracts (pic2) – a feature of F. vesca– http://efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=49109&flora_id=2. I do not know if the rubicola also features those bracts. Neither do I know flower size. Please check flower size of vesca at – http://www.ars-grin.gov/npgs/images/cor/fragaria/2011/April/ (there are other species as well).


I would like to add that bracts are also present in F. bucharica (possibly also in F. rubicola) as in F. vesca. So, please first check F. vesca is present in wild or in escape in HP (or other state). If present it maybe the same else it has two more probability as the discussion so far.


Taking it as Fragaria nubicola in view of discussions in another thread.


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Flora of Uttarakhand- Potentilla sp for Id- JM: (mixed thread)- 2 correct images as above.

Wild Herb captured on 13/8/10 during the trek from Ghangaria (around 11,000 ft.) to Hemkunt Sahib (around 14000 ft.).


.


ID requested (VoF)1: Valley of flowers, Uttaranchal is at an altitude of around 3600 mtrs. and having an extremely cold snowy weather. The photo was taken in June 2007. Normally the flowering season is August onwards.


-I have seen these plants growing wild on the way to Gulmarg, Kashmir.


-Yes I believe you as this is very common around the Himalayas


very common in Kashmir valley


-My photographs taken at the Singalila N.P. & Neora Valley.


-the second photo with the fruit is really beutiful



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Rosaceae Week:Fragaria nubicola (03/10/2011 NSJ)Himalayan StrawberryFragaria nubicola from Shimla,
Photo taken in Dec 2007.



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Rosaceae Week- Fragaria nubicolaFragaria nubicola from Manali.
Family: Rosaceae

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Is this a variant of anemone?: Date/Time- Oct 2011
Location- Himachal Pradesh, Hampta River valley, Kullu, Spiti
Habitat- Wild. the terrain they were growing in was largely rocky, with some grass and shrub



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Flora of Chakrata Part-2: 24102011-BS-1 Fragaria sp for id from Deovan trekk Chakrata:

Fragaria sp from Deovan trekk Chakrata. Small wild herb with trifoliate leaves which are with deeply serrate margins, flowers white with 5 petals

shot on 21-10-11 at a height of about 2600 mts


I think same Fragaria nubicola


Sir i was also thinking about this id but in this plant sepals are not entire



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VoF Week : Fragaria nubicola (The Himalayan Strawberry): Name of species : Fragaria nubicola

Family : Rosaceae
Habit : Herb
Habitat : Hill slope
Date of click : 14th Aug`12
Location: After the first bridge cross, enroute to VoF (c apprx 1 Kme from entrance gate) above 3200 Mtrs height.

Abundance : Not very common, perhaps single sighting.



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VoF Week: Fragaria nubicola at VoF:  Fragaria nubicola (Family: Rosaceae) at VoF.


Yes … Nice photographs.



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VoF Week: Fragaria nubicola from Valley:

Fragaria nubicola from Valley
Pls validate

Yes … Nice photographs.



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Fragaria nubicola ABMAY01/05 : 5 posts by 2 authors.
It was my first time seeing this Himalayan strawberry. We have the Duchesnea indica aplenty but this one is scarce. I saw several plant with flowers today but no fruit.
Fragaria nubicola (Himalayan Strawberry)
Above Mcleodganj, Dharamshala, HP
1850m approx. 

3 May 2015


very nice. now wait for the berries to develope.
what pollinates these?

I will go again next weekend. These are not nearby where I live but are reached after an hour or so of walk up in the mountains. I will report next week. I saw almost every flower swarming with ants. Could they be helping in pollination?


Well, since its that far, carry some first aid like itch guard, anti histamine and some lacto calamine type skin rub. i know from experience. be careful of the ants they bite. quite painful and swelling results. ants and plant kingdom is a long complicated story. some trees invite them. provide special shelter. food. protection. some simply let them cut up their leaves etc etc
some are biting types see this report in smithsonian:

but they are talking of trees. there are many such examples.

i just read a long review last week but cant remember where

it was about tree with big thorns
==

but strawberry plants get infected with aphids

and ants try to eat the dew from aphids Fcps
or eat even the strawberry flower nectar.

they all bite. they do not pollinate the plant , bees and some small butterflies do..

I knew it and now i have a solid ref from virginia tech: Fcps

Thank you … I will be careful. Thank you doubly for the links.



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Rosaceae Fortnight 1-14 Sep.2015: Fragaria nubicola from Uttarakhand_DSR_Sep_9/9 : 2 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (1)
Fragaria nubicola (Lindl. ex Hook.f.) Lacaita. photographed in Sunderdhunga valley (3200m), Uttarakhand


Very good photograph



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Rosaceae Fortnight :: Fragaria nubicola :: Valley of Flowers :: DVSEP06 : 3 posts by 2 authors. 3 images.
Fragaria nubicola (Lindl. ex Hook.f.) Lacaita

Dear friends, I have deduced the ID from various uploads during the VoF week (Aug-Sep of 2012); please validate the ID if the aspects seen in photos below help.

at Valley of Flowers on August 2, 2012


Appressed calyx lobes (almost touching fruit) are distinctive for F. nubicola (Stems and petioles are also appressed hairy)

In F. vesca they are spreading as also stems and petioles are with spreading hairy


.


Many thanks to … for the ID in my photostream at flickr.
along Rohtang pass on June 2, 2008
… sole photo; taken during traffic jam while ascending Rohtang 

With Indian F. vesca having mostly been identified as F. nubicola, I don’t think F. vesca occurs Himalayas. Not listed even in Himalyan List

Even Flowers of India does not feature it

Would be safe to assume it as.F. nubicola.



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Rosaceae Fortnight: Fragaria nubicola from Kashmir : 1 post by 1 author. Attachments (4)



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Fragaria nubicola, photographed from Chopta Mandal Road in Uttarakhand.


.

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Fragaria nubicola. Wild strawberry with delicious fruits.


Fragaria vesca L.
Many thanks to … for the ID in my photostream at flickr.
along Rohtang pass on June 2, 2008
sole photo; taken during traffic jam while ascending Rohtang

With Indian F. vesca having mostly been identified as F. nubicola, I don’t think F. vesca occurs Himalayas. Not listed even in Himalyan List

Even Flowers of India does not feature it

Would be safe to assume it as F. nubicola.


Thank you very very much … for this validation.

I will correct my notes at my flickr photostream.


Thanks, … In that case should I transfer all threads under Fragaria vesca to F. nubicola ?

Pl. confirm.


Thanks … for the update. Wish BSI soon complete uploading its checklist of all genera of Indian flora. GRIN has something to say about distribution in Asia GRIN. But who would tell us what is the real scenario!


Fragaria vesca is reported from China but not Himalayas now.


By referring GRIN I meant to support your view that vesca is not found in our country.


Rosaceae Week:: Fragaria nubicola from Shimla (NSJ-02) : 2 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (3)

Himalayan StrawberryFragaria nubicola from Shimla,
Photo taken in Dec 2007.


.


Fragaria nubicola ABMAY01/05 : 15 posts by 6 authors.

It was my first time seeing this Himalayan strawberry. We have the Duchesnea indica aplenty but this one is scarce. I saw several plant with flowers today but no fruit.
Fragaria nubicola (Himalayan Strawberry)
Above Mcleodganj, Dharamshala, HP
1850m approx. 

3 May 2015


very nice. now wait for the berries to develop. what pollinates these?


I will go again next weekend. These are not nearby where I live but are reached after an hour or so of walk up in the mountains. I will report next week. I saw almost every flower swarming with ants. Could they be helping in pollination?


Well, since its that far, carry some first aid like itch guard, anti histamine and some lacto calamine type skin rub. i know from experience. be careful of the ants they bite. quite painful and swelling results.
ants and plant kingdom is a long complicated story. some trees invite them. provide special shelter, food,
protection, some simply let them cut up their leaves etc etc
some are biting types see this report in smithsonian:

but they are talking of trees, there are many such examples

i just read a long review last week but cant remember where

it was about tree with big thorns
==

but strawberry plants get infected with aphids and ants try to eat the dew from aphids Fcps

or eat even the strawberry flower nectar, they all bite, they do not pollinate the plant, bees and some small butterflies do..

I knew it and now i have a solid ref from virginia tech: Fcps


Thank you … I will be careful.
Thank you doubly for the links.


Fragaria vesca– very frequent in temperate and Sub-Alpine slopes edible as wild strawberry.

Duchesnia indica on the other hand grows in lower areas, has yellow flowers, calyx lobes drooping downwards and fruits are tasteless. Dog’s Strawberry.


Fragaria nubicola (Lindl. ex Hook.f.) Lacaita is an accepted name per the plantlist http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/rjp-11720


efi pages on Fragaria nubicola & Fragaria vesca 


How do you differentiate it with Fragaria daltoniana J. Gray?


How about one 1962 note – http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1139/b62-081?


You may also like to check another doc, freely available at link


Whenever we have to check for an East Himalayan plant, you are likely to find it in Flora of China

F. daltoniana: Sepals reflexed in fruit; plants not taller than 6 cm; epicalyx oblong with 2-3 lobed apex

F. nubicola: Sepals appressed in fruit; plants up to 25 cm tall; epicalyx segments lanceolate, acuminate at tip


Thank you … for these excellent resources. From whatever I could absorb from the second paper it seems  that F. vesca is unlikely to be my plant (being found only west of the Urals, Northern Europe, America…). F. nubicola on the other hand is a distinct possibility.
The other paper you pointed to gives the geographical range of F. vesca vesca generally as Asia, so perhaps a subspecies exists in these parts.

Next time I am in that area, I will collect a specimen and do a detailed analysis.


Yes, …,  my guess is also that Fragaria vesca is unlikely to be found in wild.
Thank you …, interestingly FoC thinks F. rubicola is present particularly in Kashmir (along with Nepal, Sikkim……) not as a general in India. Neither FoP thinks the species is present in India. Of-course they are not the last words, because the doc

link state the species is present in HP (though it is kept inside a bracket for reason unknown).


Found a couple of flowers on my trek yesterday and I though of posting them here. This one is from about 2500m but I saw another at 2800m too.
Fragaria nubicola
Mcleodganj-Triund, HP
2500m

01 October 2016. 3 images.


Lovely images.  So useful to have a shot of the rear of a flower, which illustrates the calyx/sepals so much better – their shape is often important to know to help towards a reliable identification.  As is the underside of leaves (as well as upper surface). The final shot also shows well the ‘epicalyx’ with lobes alternating with the 5 calyx lobes.
Fragaria nubicola is very common in the temperate and subalpine zones along much of the Himalayan Stewart remarked that the berries were often gathered for sale by children.  I have seen it growing abundantly in and at the edge of lower forest in Bhutan (when working as a consultant to The Royal Government on ‘The Cultivation of Medicinal Plants for Traditional Medicine’ – Himalayan Strawberry is used in Tibetan Medicine.  Interestingly, it has the same Tibetan name as Saxifraga stenophylla (formerly S.flagellaris) which also has small reddish runners.  If my memory serves me correctly, the strawberry was the superior form according to Tibetan doctors.
It is common in Kashmir but when I first came to H.P., leading a botanical tour in Lahoul in 1985, we found Duchesnea indica on the floor of the Deodar forest at Manali – F.nubicola occurs on the Rohtang.  By coincidence, I viewed an image of a close-up (but not as good as …) of a white flower from Rohtang which I thought probably was this species, taken by a British visitor (en route to Ladakh) just days ago.  … images help me confirm its identity.  “nubicola” means “cloud dweller” and it is certainly found higher in the mountains (to 3800m) than Duchesnea indica.  I do not recollect having tasted its fruits but am sure they are better than the iinspid ones of the ‘Indian Strawberry’ (Duchesnea).

There was an inquiry about distinguishing F.nubicola from F.daltoniana – the latter, found from Kumaon to Sikkim usually has (according to Kletter & Kriechbaum in ‘Tibetan Medicinal Plants’) smaller leaflets with only 4 ot 6 teeth on each side, not silky on the underside, the ripe fruit becoming conical and pink or whitish when ripe.


Oops!  Just goes to show that one needs to keep up-to-date as to revisions of genera of plants in the Himalaya – and the reality is that the vast majority of genera in the Himalaya are in need of revision, some urgently so, as our understanding of them is very poor.
Whilst looking into Fragaria nubicola, I noticed that F.bucharica is listed by Dickore & Klimes in their check-list for Ladakh flora. I had not heard of this species before.  Their is no reference to it.
I could not readily find any images or descriptions to check. I then spotted the post of … from 2015 which had been re-posted, which draws attention to: link – a revision of the Himalayan species of Fragaria by Gunter Staudt.  I can only access the abstract at present. Can some get the full article and send a copy to me and summarise the differences between this species and F.nubicola, as I think there may be both species in HP?  Thus we until this is checked, we can only the plant above Mcleod Ganj as provisionally F.nubicola.
The abstract states that F.bucharica is found in Kashmir (and it seems the Ladakh part but it must be uncommon and restricted to the moister parts close to the border with Kashmir). F.nubicola is distributed from HP to SW China, whereas F.bucharica is found in Kashmir, presumably N.Pakistan, E.Pakistan and Tadjikistan.
Yet more names changes to celebrate!  Please note that you find me often saying that I consider this to be a particular species, based on my present understanding, all-too-aware that the situation could change – even for species one is/was fairly confident they knew well!  I repeat and this applies to all science, not just botany but we can ONLY ever say (if we have the necessary expertise) that a plant belongs to a particular species, to the best of our present understanding, mindful that revisions of a genus could be taking place as images are posted.  Or we were not aware of the revisions.  The picture is complicated by differences of opinion in the botanical world amongst the taxonomists who revise plants (some of which perform excellent revisions, other not).  So sometimes this means the changes/revisions are not generally accepted or rejected altogether.
I realise how bewildering this can be and discouraging but we need to keep going. It also illustrates the NECESSITY for India botany to collaborate internationally and keep up with studies on genera and species found within Indian territory (and bordering countries, as it is worth “keeping a look out for species from bordering countries which may have been overlooked previously). Likewise, it is ESSENTIAL for Indian botanists who publish species NEW TO SCIENCE or NEW TO INDIA publish in top quality International Journals. Otherwise their findings cannot be inspected/checked or be made known.
I am still unable to access a description of a Waldheimia huegelii or know how to distinguish it from other Waldheimias.
Their is nowadays a International Code which needs to be followed for the VALID naming of a NEW species. One of the reasons there are so many synonyms for certain species, is that botanists all over the world, acting independently, published species under names without checking – it was much more difficult to do so in the 19th Century.

Oh Dear, things do have a habit of turning out to be complicated.  We all wish it was simpler and easier but hopefully we can all ‘enjoy’ or at least put up with the challenges of naming plants – and keeping “up-to-date”.


Thank you once again … for taking the time to explain things in detail.


Pl. check this link


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Fragaria nubicola Lindl. ex Lacaita : 3 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (4)

Location: Taplejung, Nepal
Date: 18 April 2017

Altitude: 6000 ft. 



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Fragaria daltoniana Gay (accepted name) : 2 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (1)

Location: Kalinchowk, Dolakha, Nepal
Altitude: 9000 ft.
Date: 26 July 2014

Nepali Name: भूइं  ऐंसेलु Bhuin Ainselu 


Does not appear to be Fragaria daltoniana as per keys available at Fragaria nubicola ?


Looks like … Need validation !



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Fragaria nubicola : 3 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (4)

Fragaria nubicola

growing commonly near Chopta, Uttarakhand at an altitude of about 8,500 feet



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Fragaria nubicola Lindl. ?? : 6 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (6)- around 800 kb each. 

Location : Lava, Kalimpong, India
Date : 11 May 2018
Elevation :  7000 ft.
Habit : Wild

To me also appear close to images at Fragaria nubicola


 


Tiny flowers on way Rohtang Pass to Spiti valley.
Creeping on the surface of soil.

Can we have a photograph where leaves with flowers are shown? They seem to be mixed with leaves of TrifoliumPotentilla and Rumex.

Could be some species of Anemone

You are right …
Yes I agree with you. More morphological features like leaves are needed for ID of a particular plant.
This happens with everybody. In the heat of capturing more plant species we often tend to forget this factor. In spite of that we get the Id about many flowers on Indiantreepix due to many experts. Then one can go to books and learn further to increase one’s knowledge and when he or she gets a chance to visit the place again; can find and study the species further.
This should not become a shortcut for availability of ID. Each one has its own choice
Thanks … I also think this to be from the genus Anemone.

Fragaria nubicola Lindl.



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