Rosa brunonii Lindl., Ros. Monogr. 120, pl. 14 120 1820. (Syn: Rosa brunonis Wall.; Rosa clavigera H. Lév.; Rosa moschata var. nepalensis Lindl.; Rosa napaulensis Andr.; Rosa nepalensis Lindl. ex Steud. (ambiguous synonym); Rosa pubescens Roxb. (ambiguous synonym));  
China (Sichuan, Yunnan), Tibet, Bhutan, N-India, Jammu & Kashmir (Poonch,
Kashmir), Nepal, ?Burma,
Pakistan (Murree, Baluchistan, Kurram, Chitral, Swat,
Hazara), Pakistani Kashmir (Gilgit), Afghanistan (Kabul, Kunar / Nuristan,
Laghman, Nangarhar)
as per Catalogue of Life;
 
RO-zuh — referring to the rose genus, or the color 
brun-OH-nee-eye — named for Robert Brown, 19th century Scottish botanist
 
Himalayan Musk Rose; Hindi: Kunji, Kunja, Karer, Kwiala; Punjab: Tarni; Kashmir: Phulwari, Chal; Sans: Sewati;
 
Climbing shrub with with pubescent young branches; prickles strong, hooked; leaves pinnate with 5-7 leaflets, elliptic lanceolate, 3-5 cm long, softly pubescent; flowers white, fragrant, 3-5 cm diam., in more than 10-fld
panicles; hips ovoid, 5-6 mm across. 
 
Native to: Himalayas (1500 – 2400 m)
As per efi thread:
These are the characters I had digged out while fixing rose growing in Srinagar, Kashmir. They have often been confused in the past. R. brunonii is much more commoner in Himalayas, R. moschata rarer, mostly planted.

Rosa brunonii                                                     R. moschata
1. Young branches, leaves beneath, petiole         1.Young shoots, petioles, rachis, leaves beneath 
    and rachis pubescent.                                        except midrib glabrous.
2. Prickles strong hooked                                    2. Prickles straight or slightly curved
3. Leaves elliptic-lanceolate, 2.5-5 cm long        3. Leaves ovate to elliptic-lanceolate, 2-7 cm long
4. Flowers usually more than 10                          4. Flowers usually more than 10.
5. Early flowering, mostly April-May                    5. Late flowering, mostly May-June 
 

Rosa moschata ABMAY01/02 : 8 posts by 3 authors.
This is a stand-alone shrub about 6-8 ft tall and a similar spread. The stalks are prickly, leaves pinnate (7 to 9 on one). The leaf stalk has small thorns below but has none above. The buds appear at the end of the branches in groups.
My limited experience says that it is Rosa moschata but I could be confusing it with R. brunonii. Please advise.
Rosa moschata (Musk Rose)–Please confirm.
Mcleodganj, Dharamshala, HP
1750m
1 May 2015


These are the characters I had digged out while fixing rose growing in Srinagar, Kashmir. They have often been confused in the past. R. brunonii is much more commoner in Himalayas, R. moschata rarer, mostly planted.

Rosa brunonii                                                     R. moschata
1. Young branches, leaves beneath, petiole          1.Young shoots, petioles, rachis, leaves beneath 
    and rachis pubescent.                                        except midrib glabrous.
2. Prickles strong hooked                                    2. Prickles straight or slightly curved
3. Leaves elliptic-lanceolate, 2.5-5 cm long           3. Leaves ovate to elliptic-lanceolate, 2-7 cm long
4. Flowers usually more than 10                           4. Flowers usually more than 10.
5. Early flowering, mostly April-May                      5. Late flowering, mostly May-June 

Thank you … I will go look at the young shoots today and get some pictures. They are just beginning to flower so the floering season overlaps. I will carry a ruler and measure the leaves/petals as well. Would you say from the pictures that these prickles we have are strongly hooked? I have no reference for the straight ones. Do we have photos of R. moschata prickles?

I see the rachis and petiole are pubescent in the pictures but leaves look glabrous underneath but I will have a closer look today keeping these keys in mind.
Thank you once again for taking the time for a detailed comparison.


I found the following information here;

Rosa brunonii is a very variable species in all its characters but especially in the indumentum of stems and leaves, size and shape of leaflets as well as in number and size of flowers. In practice forms with pubescent stems and narrow pubescent leaflets are considered to be ‘typical’ Rosa brunonii, While forms with glabrous stems and glabrous, broader leaflets are often separated as Rosa moschata Herrm. In spite of its variability all available Pakistani specimens (at hand) represent, in my opinion, one well-defined species and its dividing seems to be fully artificial.

Rosa moschata Herrm. was described in 1762 based on specimens cultivated in Europe but it is said to be of Asiatic, Persian origin. The identity of European Rosa moschata with the roses cultivated in south-west Asia remains, however, an open question. After having seen numerous specimens of the species collected in Pakistan and Kashmir, I suppose that all cultivated specimens from Afghanistan and Iran, identified earlier by me as Rosa moschata(Zieliński 1982), represent in fact Rosa brunonii, changed in cultivation by mutations, crossing and/or selection. According to G. S. Thomas (1983, Climbing roses old and new) the ‘true’ Rosa moschata blossoms in summer and autumn. Among available rather rich material from Pakistan and neighbouring countries I have found no specimen flowering later than in May (-June). 


I visited several shrubs today and found a couple climbing quite high on to cedars. The largest leaf was at the apex (~9cm) with subsequent pairs decreasing in length gradually. The petals were about one inch long. The new shoots looked mildly pubescent to me but I didn’t see any hair underneath leaves. The characteristics are somewhat mixed but I am more inclined to now think that what we have here is Rosa brunonii as you suggested before. Please advise.


I think yes, R. brunonii


a nice case study. we learned something here


I consider this to be within what I understand to be Rosa brunonii.


Thank you … for the confirmation. … had the same opinion when I first posted these and we agreed that it was R. brunonii but the subject of the email thread remained the same.


 

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Find below pics of Rosa moschata (R. brunonii) from Himachal Pradesh.
Usually having white flowers, I have recorded one plant with pinkish flowers..
Hope it is also the same species with some colour variation… or may be a result of some hybridisation.. Comments are solicited pl.


Kindly check for Rosa macrophylla Lindl. for pink one.


efi page on Rosa macrophylla


It would be helpful to know where and at what altitude in H.P. these roses were found?  The ‘pink’ flowered one does not seem to match the first two images. Were they from different locations?
Pink-flowered variants of Rosa brunonii are known from Bhutan, so the flower colour alone does not preclude it from being R.brunonii.
See my posts about the COMPLEXITIES of the genus Rosa.
Rosa brunonii seems to be the widespread climbing rose typically with white or cream flowers. But other species (and cultivated hybrids) are known.
My post about Rosa in Britain & Ireland indicates that a leading specialist who is currently acting as Referee for specimens of Rosa states that one cannot DETERMINE a species of Rosa in the UK on the basis of flowers alone! FULLY-DEVELOPED HIPS are required along with portions of leading stem (not suckers) with leaves and characteristic bristles; a sample of sepals is beneficial…….


I have photographed these roses from the same locality in Himachal Pradesh – about 800 m asl near Sundernagar in Mandi district. Of all the wild plants, only one plant was having pinkish flowers.
I have not had the chance to revisit the locality again.


Thanks for supplying the information.
My records indicate that Rosa brunonii has not been found below 1220m before so 800m is significantly lower.
Given its low altitude and thus proximity to habitation the appearance of being wild COULD just mean it has naturalised.
Interesting.
Please note my other comments as to the challenges of identifying roses.


Thanks. I’ll try to revisit the site this year to have better appreciation of the situation.


Thanks. Do read my comments as to Rosa webbiana/ macrophylla in Ladakh and the records of Rosa oxyodon and R.tuschetica from Ladakh both of which approach some forms of Rosa macrophylla

 

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Rosa brunonii Lindl. (accepted name) ??? : 7 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (4)

Location: Ranikot, Bhaktapur, Nepal
Altitude:  6200 ft.
Date: 10 May 2014


This, commonly known as ‘The Himalayan Musk Rose’ is certainly the likely candidate.
Though one must be aware just how variable this species is.  I don’t think there are any other roses known from the region it is likely to be confused with (when in the wild). Various forms of this rose are cultivated in the UK.
This is the ONLY Rose mentioned in Flora of Kathmandu Valley – known as ‘Bhainsi kanda’.
The author says this flowers in April (which seems quite early to me); the specimen shown was photographed in May.
Recorded from 1600- 2100m.  Hips described as globose & red (but shape varies a good deal on the specimens of what I understand to be this rose).
Enumeration of Flowering Plants of Nepal says 1500-2400m (Kashmir to Bhutan, Assam, Burma & W.China).
This also says that the following roses as cultivated in Nepal: R.banksiae, R.chinensis & R.moschata – that is in addition to non-native species R.laevigata, R.multiflora – both natives of China, often cultivated.
 



  

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Rosaceae Fortnight: Rosa moschata from Kashmir-GSSEP82/82 : 1 post by 1 author. Attachments (3)
Rosa moschata Herrm.; Rosarum Monographia: or, a botanical History of Roses Rosarum Monographia: or, a botanical History of Roses; 1820 120, t.14 1820.
Rosa brunonii Lindl., Ros. Monogr. 120, pl. 14 120 1820.

Syn: Rosa pubescens Roxb.
Common name: Himalayan Musk Rose
Climbing shrub with with pubescent young branches; prickles strong, hooked; leaves pinnate with 5-7 leaflets, elliptic lanceolate, 3-5 cm long, softly pubescent; flowers white, fragrant, 3-5 cm diam., in more than 10-fld panicles; hips ovoid, 5-6 mm across. 
Photographed from Harwan, Srinagar Kashmir in June
Again included under R. moschata as per The Plant List


 

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Flowers and Trees from Uttarakhan​d-ID requested_​DS24052011​_SN4: Attaching a pic of a flower – in Kakragad, Uttarrakhand, April 2011 Wild rose or some tea variety? Found on a hill trail on the bank of river Mandikini.


Yes, this appears to be R.brunonii‘The Himalayan Musk Rose’ which is highly variable.


 

 

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RO-zuh — referring to the rose genus, or the color 
brun-OH-nee-eye — named for Robert Brown, 19th century Scottish botanist
[image: Rosa brunonii]<http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.flickr.com%2Fphotos%2Fdi…>
 Jun 4, 2008 at Manali, Himachal Pradesh
commonly known as: Himalayan musk rose • Nepalese: भैंसी कन्दे गुलाफ bhainsi kande gulaf
Native to: Himalayas (1500 – 2400 m) 
   – … Jun 4, 2008 at Manali, Himachal Pradesh
[image: fu san fang qiang wei (Chinese: 复伞房蔷薇)]<http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.flickr.com%2Fphotos%2Fdi…>
[image:    Himalayan Musk Rose]
   <http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.flickr.com%2Fphotos%2Fdi…>

Absolutely wild beauty .. [image: … festoons of wild roses]<http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.flickr.com%2Fphotos%2Fdi…


Does seem to match what I understand to be Rosa brunonii.


 

Rosaceae Week: Rosa brunonii from:  Rosa brunonii Lindl., Ros. Monogr. 120, pl. 14 120 1820.
Syn: Rosa pubescens Roxb.
Common name: Himalayan Musk Rose
Climbing shrub with with pubescent young branches; prickles strong, hooked; leaves pinnate with 5-7 leaflets, elliptic lanceolate, 3-5 cm long, softly pubescent; flowers white, fragrant, 3-5 cm diam., in more than 10-fld
panicles; hips ovoid, 5-6 mm across.
Photographed from Harwan, Srinagar Kashmir in June


Yes, this seems to fit Rosa brunonii, ‘The Himalayan Musk Rose’.
Pictures taken by roadside on the way to Srinagar, Kashmir on the 6th of Sept,11.
These were found in a number of places along the main highway. From far they looked like some berries.
Could not see a single flower though.
Possibly … can throw some light on the species of rose and its color.


Yes Rosa brunonii


These Rose fruits (rose hips; German Hagebutte ) are used to make Jam. They are rich in Vitamin C.
Hagebutten Tee is very popular in winter months, nice color, nice taste and gud against cold.

Just that the hips have to many seeds and hair, so that it is difficult to get just the pulp.
My fotos (Sept 2011 in Bremen) are attached.
3 images.

How I missed it? yes a classic rose,,,
much loved by those who love non GMA anything..


Yes, these hips match those of Rosa brunonii – ‘The Himalayan Musk Rose’.


 

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Rosa brunonii Lindl., The Himalayan Musk Rose, common in forests, open slopes, as rambler. Photographed above Cheshma Shahi and Dachhigam in Kashmir.

I saw a lot of rose bushes in the wild without flowers at Srinagar, but with lot of berries. I am attaching a picture of it. is this the same plant


Your plant seems more likely as R. canina because of smaller leaves and larger stipules as also larger hips.


Thank you for the information. I found a number of these plants in wilderness behind chesme shahi


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DV :: 31 JUL 12 – 0643 :: fruiting plant along NH58 near Tangani: 31 JUL 12
NH58near Tangani, about 4500 ft
Habitat: along NH58 near Tangani
Habit: perhaps a climber (or straggler).
… the plant was far away – could not make out the plant which bore the fruits. Apologies for providing single picture.

Rosa brunonii I hope. Above I hope a portion of Smilax I hope


Thank you very much, …
In light of your thought, now it seems very convincing to be Rosa brunonii.


This comes within what I think it Rosa brunonii.


 

 

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This Tree / Shrub was spotted near a water stream. It was bit away from the trail and was inaccessible.
Family: Rosaceae.
Date/Time: 07-08-2012 / 02:30PM
Location: along “Govindghat-Ghangaria route”

Yes Sir Rosa brunonii to me also.


This does fit what I understand to be Rosa brunonii.


 

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HP, Oct 2014 :: Requesting ID – shrub with red fruits :: ARKDEC-10 : 11 posts by 4 authors. Attachments (3)

Requesting to please provide ID of this plant with red fruits captured near Manali, HP in October 2014.


Rosa sp.


Thank you … Hoping to get some clue to the species ID….


Rosa moschataKujja , Kujjni.


Rosa moschata– A WILD ROSE MOST COMMON IN HILLS. COLLECT THE FLOERS EARLY MORNING BEFORE SUNRISE. These emit a scintillating & pleasant fragrance. Also made into garlands in hills or spread on the bed or under pillow to enjoy the perfume. Essential oil useful in perfumery. Fruits are edible. Leaves make a good fodder for goats and new born  sheep & goat off springs. As kujja or Kujje ka phool, it is an important flower mentioned in local songs & proverbs. With its white fragrant flowers, growing in large patches, it adds beauty  to the landscapes. 


Hopefully, it may be Rosa brunonii.


It is Rosa brunonis


Thank you … for the ID…

As per the Plant list, R. moschata is an accepted name and R. brunonii is the synonym… 


Pl. provide the link.
As per The Plant List Ver. 1.1, there are so many species with name as Rosa moschata, which are different from Rosa brunonii. 
efi page on Rosa brunonii


The Plant List link that I had referred to is this
But please suggest the correct name…. 


 
 

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Flower for ID (29/06/2011 NSJ-01): Attaching for identification. Appears to be from Rosaceae family.
Location – Srinagar Gardens – Pari – Mahal (fencing)
Habitat – Wild
Date June 01, 2011


Rosa moschata


As per The Plant List Ver. 1.1, there are so many species with name as Rosa moschata.

Is it Rosa moschata Herrm. or some other species ?


A reply from another thread:

“I think Indian specimens belong to R. brunonii


This does seem to fit what I understand to be Rosa brunonii (previously known in Kashmir as Rosa moschata).  Given this is
a location where a number of cultivated roses are found one should not automatically assume it is the native/ wild R.brunonii.


  

Rosaceae Week – Rosa moschata (NSJ-03/10/11 -01) : 6 posts by 6 authors. Attachments (2).  
Rosa moschata from Srinagar, Kashmir.


Lovely Catch … is it wild?


As per The Plant List Ver. 1.1, there are so many species with name as Rosa moschata.

Is it Rosa moschata Herrm. or some other species ?


The plant uploaded seems to be Rosa moschata


I think Indian specimens belong to R. brunonii


This specimen seems to fit what I understand to be Rosa brunonii which in the past was known as R.moschata in Kashmir.
Be aware there are a number of cultivated roses in this area that might be mistaken for this.


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ANJUN33/34 Rosa brunonii Lindl. (Churdhar Trip 33) : 2 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (4)
Family: Rosaceae
Date: May 2015
Place: Renuka Ji-Haripurdhar Route, Himachal Pradesh
Habit: Shrub
Altitude: 1200-1400 metres above sea level


I think yes.


Whilst this may/ might come within Rosa brunonii, I am uncertain on the basis of these images not showing a fully-developed rose.  It is certainly the most likely species but there may be other possibilities and given the complexities with Rosa, caution needs to be expressed.


 

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Rosa moschata Herrm. … synonym: Rosa brunonii Lindl.
at Manali on June 4, 2008


We are back to R. moschata after many decades of treating it as separate species. Would be interested to know any recent publication which treats it under R. moschata). The Plant List is not very explicit, the link does not help.


 

 

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Rosa moschata Herrm. synonym: Rosa brunonii Lindl.
along Govind Ghat – Ghangaria trail on August 1, 2012


Thanks, … But earlier discussions at Rosa brunonii tell a different story.


I agree …

… has also pointed to this matter in another post of mine. I have not yet changed the names in my flickr photostream.
You may please associate these R. moschata posts to R. brunonii in database


But unfortunately The Plant List treats R. brunonii as synonym of R. moschata, GRIN treats it distinct


Other recipients:
I think this comes within Rosa brunonii, the variable and widespread white to cream-flowered ‘climbing’ rose in the Himalaya.
I think this comes within Rosa brunonii, the variable and widespread white to cream-flowered ‘climbing’ rose in the Himalaya.

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please identify this rose climber from Uttarakhand.


This is Rosa moschata Herrm. A subdeciduous rambling climber, with white flowers. Common in open places, forest clearings, 600-2000m. Synonyms: Rosa brunonii Lindl. Rosa recurva Roxb. ex Lindl. 


Unfortunately, the photos are not in focus but seems to come within what I understand to be Rosa brunonii.


 

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Rosaceae Fortnight Climbing Rose-PC-29-07.09.2015 : 6 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (2)
Now mailing another photos of white rose climer from Uttarakhanda.


Is it wild or cultivated ? 


Yes … To me it looked like a wild plant, it was growing on a slope near a road.


Rosa species in eFloraofindia (with details/ keys from published papers/ regional floras/ FRLHT/ FOI/ Biotik/ efloras/ books etc., where ever available on net)  


This should be Rosa moschata Herrm. 
Synonym: R. brunonii Lindley


Rosa brunonii is understood to be the widespread climbing rose with white to cream flowers, which this most likely is.


Rosaceae Week:: Rosa moschata from Srinagar (NSJ-07) : 3 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (3)
Rosa moschata from Srinagar (Parimahal) pl validate.
June 2011

efi page on Rosa brunonii (our species found in India)


This appears to come within what I understand to be Rosa brunonii previously known in Kashmir as R.moschata.


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Fruits of Rosa : 3 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (2)
Fruits of Rose from Kullu area of Himachal


These hips come within what I understand to be Rosa brunonii.

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rosa brunonii : 3 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (4)
rosa brunonii

seen near makku and sari village in rudraprayag district, uttarakhand at an altitude of about 6,500 feet


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Rosa brunonii Lindl. : 1 post by 1 author. Attachments (9)
Location: Phulchoki, Lalitpur, Nepal
Altitude: 1698 m.
Date: 8 May 2019
Habit : Wild 





 

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Rosa brunonii Lindl. : 3 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (8)- around 750 kb each. 
Location: Nagarkot, Bhaktapur
Date: 16  May 2019
Elevation: 1888  m.

Habit : Wild 


 

Rosa brunonii ABMAY2019/02 : 3 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (16)
The flowering season for this rose is coming to an end slowly. We have some bushes in flower still but most are now covered in the remnants of flowers (devoid of petals). I photographed certain features this season and am sharing them here for the record. We have had a very fruitful discussion on the differences between R. moschata and R. brunonii before and some of the features distinguishing brunonii are: young leaves pubescent, prickles hooked and an early flowering season. There is a lovely illustration of the species on Wikispecies here. I have also tried to show here the hairy stigma, stipules and bracteoles, and the seeds contained within a rose hip (I found one from the previous season). Please advise if I am making a mistake in interpreting this evidence.
I found the number of leaflets reaching 11 occasionally. So I will say leaflets (5)7-9(11) for the species. Also the relative size of leaflets on one leaf may or may not differ significantly. On some leaves the size of leaflet pairs decreases down from the terminal leaf, on others all leaflets are more or less the same size and still on some the lowermost pair is the smallest while others are similar sized. Hairs on the petioles and peduncles can be white or red glandular or a mixture of the two kinds.
Rosa brunonii
Mcleodganj and above,
1750-1850m approx.
Throughout May 2019.

 

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Rosa brunonii Lindl. : 2 posts by 1 author. Attachments (1)- 6 mb. 

Location: Ranikot, Gundu, Bhakltapur 
Date: 15 September 2019
Elevation: 2006 m.
Habit : Wild


Attachments (1)- 5 mb. 


 

References:


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