Anagallis arvensis var. caerulea (L.) Gouan, Fl. Monsp. 30 1765. (Syn: Anagallis arvensis f. azurea Hyl.; Anagallis arvensis f. caerulea (L.) Lüdi; Anagallis caerulea L.; Anagallis coerulea Schreb. [Spelling variant]);
.
Scarlet pimpernel Anagallis arvensis var. arvensis is a temperate plant with orange-coloured flowers;
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Anagallis arvensis ssp. foemina from Kashmir:  Anagallis arvensis ssp. foemina (syn: A. arvensis var. coerulea) from Kashmir, this low altitude species was found growing on descent road from Baramula to Uri beyond Mohra power station at altitude of approximately 1400 m.


Anagallis arvensis var. coerulea (L.) Gouan as per thread


 


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Id250210phk 1: Id please
Date/Time :20 Feb,2010 12.30 pm
Location : Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve M.P.
Habitat :wild
Plant Habit :Herb, height 9-12 inches
Leaves :sessile opposite


Anagallis arvensis var. coerulea


Known as Krishnaneel in Hindi, common weed in winter crop. It is known as “Poor man’s weather clock” as its flowers closes as indication of bad weather.

It is promising Homoeopathic medicine specially for injury due to thorn. Also used in Traditional Healing. (CGBD database)


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Kas week: PKA25:: Anagallis arvensis: Anagallis arvensis (Family: Myrsinaceae).


Kindly assess your plant in light of my earlier post on the group.


Thanks … for bringing this out. I will go thru all my photographs once again..


I think this fits with A. arvensis var. caerulea only



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Anagallis arvensis ssp. foemina from Kashmir:  Anagallis arvensis ssp. foemina (syn: A. arvensis var. coerulea) from Kashmir, this low altitude species was found growing on descent road from Baramula to Uri beyond Mohra power station at altitude of approximately 1400 m.


the flowers looks extremely cute and beautiful but the whole plant is poisonous


Anagallis arvensis var. coerulea (L.) Gouan as per thread


Yes …



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For ID 060108 VR: photo taken on 06/01/08 at Melghat Tiger reserve, Maharashtra


………….Anagallis arvensis


That was also my first reaction, but it is not Anagallis arvensis.
the stigmas are much different


Anagallis arvensis, suggested by …, is the red flower species called Scarlet Pimpernel.
The Blue Pimpernel commonly found in India is Anagallis arvensis ssp. foemina


Here are pictures of Anagallis arvensis for comparison.
http://ecoport.org/ep?SearchType=pdb&PdbID=30678&subjectType=E&subjectId=3187
http://ecoport.org/ep?SearchType=pdb&PdbID=30681&subjectType=E&subjectId=3187
http://ecoport.org/ep?SearchType=pdb&PdbID=8150&subjectType=E&subjectId=3187


Can you confirm the Id of this plant in light of your thread

Again A. arvensis var. caerulea


 


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Anagallis arvensis L. from Kaithal: This one is Anagallis arvensis Linn., Sp. Pl. 148 captured from my village in District Kaithal (Haryana) on January 30, 2012.


The flowers look really smart. Thanks for posting a detailed images.



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Flora of Madhya Pradesh: Anagallis arvensis var. caerulea (L.) Gouan from Khajuraho: Anagallis arvensis var. caerulea (L.) Gouan from Khajuraho


Yes …, This one is blooming these days..



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Anagallis arvensis:   Anagallis arvensis
Marathi name: Indraneel
At Ratangad, Maharashtra
02Feb.2013


Very nice pics … Anagallis arvensis var. caerulea


Yes …, you are right.


what nice blue flowers
is this restricted to western ghats?


…, this is very widespread, common in our wheat field borders… attaching one of mine pics..



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Dalhousie id al210411a: Location Bathri, Chamba
Altitude 1400mts
Habit herb
Habitat wild/roadside
Height 3 inches
 


– This is the Scarlet Pimpernel [Anagallis arvensis].


– Yes Anagallis arvensis var. coerulea (L.) Gouan


This variety is common in warmer climates at lower altitudes.

The orange flowered one (var. arvensis) commonly grows in temperate climates.


– I always thought scarlet pimpernel to be orange-ish red to bright red to occasionally pink.. but not this heavenly blue….


Here is my scarlet pmpernel (Anagallis arvensis var. arvensis) from Kashmir http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Scarlet%20Pimpernel.html

    It remained as flower of the month at FOI website last year, after my upload.

    I am uploading A. arvensis var arvensis from California also


– It is called poorman’s barometer, poor man’s weather-glass, because the flower closes, when bad weather is on march or fog is on the way.
The germanname is Gaukheil, (can be translated as healing insanity or mental illness). In ancient Greece it was used in the treatment of melancholia.
Because it is a bit toxic it is used in fishing, especially in india.
This is all from Wikipedia.
We find this herb in farmland and along the roadside and smaller ways, perhaps in june i may see some.



Date/Time- 11th March, 2012

Location- Place- Merrut, Uttar Pradesh

Habitat- Wild

Plant Habit- Shrub/Herb 

Height/Length- Vary from 10cm to 60cm
 


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request for plant id…habitat:garden…place:ambala cantt: Please help me to identify this plant and family…
Descriptions
place-ambala cantt
month-december
habitat-garden
habit-very small plant
stem-green and weak
leaves-small,about 2 cm
flower-blue,small,petals and sepals 5,sepals alternate with petals,stamens 4 and anthers bean shaped and yellow.


This is the Scarlet Pimpernel [Anagallis arvensis].


Rather blue pimpernel Anagallis arvensis var. caerulea (L.) Gouan

Scarlet pimpernel Anagallis arvensis var. arvensis is a temperate plant with orange-coloured flowers

http://www.learningplants.com/pictures/scarlet-pimpernel.php


Agreed with … Poor man’s weather clock Anagallis arvensis.


Anagallis is winter season crop weed in Chhattisgarh.
http://dspace.icrisat.ac.in/handle/10731/1928



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Panchagani tour ..Anagalis arvensis : Attachments (1). 3 posts by 3 authors.

Sharing Anagallis arvensis, Myrsinaceae
Founnd at Panchagani 

Sept 2013


Anagagallis arvensis var. caerulea


Thanks for lovely picture …, this common herb flowers in February-March in our area.. (Panipat)


 

A very common winter annual is being shared, wanted to know if this is only colour variation or the two specimens qualify for being different taxa..
Recorded today from Panipat..

Anagallis arvensis var. caerulea


Seems to be same A. arvensis var. caerulea but to be doubly sure and exclude (or one be A. foemina) please check this for both carefully


Thanks Sir for the link.. I think they should be same, they closely resemble in all the aspects except colour of petals… I am enclosing two more pics..


.


Anagallis arvensis subsp. caerulea photographed from Delhi



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In light of my mail in the group Dec. 21, 2011 my plant from Kashmir should be Anagallis arvensis var. coerulea (L.) Gouan, Fl. Monsp. 2930. 1765., and not subsp. foemina which is now treated as a distinct species and is a distinct plant as per a a recent study:
Manns, Ulrika; Anderberg, Arne A. (2007). “Relationships of Anagallis foemina and Anagallis arvensis (Myrsinaceae): new insights inferred from DNA sequence data”. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 45 (3): 971–980.
I am reproducing below the details of my earlier mail. 

The common pimpernel has confused both field workers and reputed authors alike, but luckily the confusion seems to have been resolved more recently. Carolus Linnaeus, the Father of Taxonomy described two closely related species of Anagallis:

Anagallis arvensis L., the scarlet pimpernel with orange-scarlet to scarlet flowers
Anagallis caerulea L., the blue pimpernel with blue flowers 
The two are now treated as two varieties var. arvensis and var. caerulea (L.) Gouan of Anagallis arvensis L.
Schreber, Spic. Fl. Lips. 5 1771 described a related species Anagallis coerulea (note slight difference in spellings), also used by Lamarck, a taxon that had been long treated as same var. caerulea of A. arvensis. It was only in 1972 that Fergussen established it to be a synonym of a distinct species Anagallis foemina Miller (1768). The plant List treats this as Anagallis arvensis subsp. foemina (Mill.) Schinz & Thell. Important to note that this taxon always has blue flowers. This is how the two species can be differentiated:
Anagallis arvensis                                                                          Anagallis foemina
1. Flowers scarlet (var. arvensis) or blue (var. caerulea)         1. Flowers blue
2. Pedicel in flower longer than subtending leaf.                      2. Pedicel in flower shorter or equal to the subtending
leaf.
3. Sepals shorter than petals especially in bud                        3. Sepals equalling or longer than petals especially in
bud
4. Petal margins overlapping                                                    4. Petal margins not overlapping
5. Petal margins with numerous hairs tipped with                    5. Petal margins with few or no hairs, which if present
globose glands have elongate terminal cells.
Let us look for our blue pimpernel (blue flowered Anagallis) more closely in light of above information to find its exact identity. Who knows we may have both taxa in India.
Anagallis arvensis var. coerulea (L.) Gouan
The following discussion in another thread of mine should be useful in search for A. foemina, discussed in most recent books.
In light of my mail in the group Dec. 21, 2011 my plant from Kashmir should be Anagallis arvensis var. coerulea (L.) Gouan, Fl. Monsp. 2930. 1765., and not subsp. foemina which is now treated as a distinct species and is a distinct plant as per a a recent study:
Manns, Ulrika; Anderberg, Arne A. (2007). “Relationships of Anagallis foemina and Anagallis arvensis (Myrsinaceae): new insights inferred from DNA sequence data”. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 45 (3): 971–980.
I am reproducing below the details of my earlier mail 

The common pimpernel has confused both field workers and reputed authors alike, but luckily the confusion seems to have been resolved more recently. Carolus Linnaeus, the Father of Taxonomy described two closely related species of Anagallis:

Anagallis arvensis L., the scarlet pimpernel with orange-scarlet to scarlet flowers
Anagallis caerulea L., the blue pimpernel with blue flowers
The two are now treated as two varieties var. arvensis and var. caerulea (L.) Gouan of Anagallis arvensis L.
Schreber, Spic. Fl. Lips. 5 1771 described a related species Anagallis coerulea (note slight difference in spellings), also used by Lamarck, a taxon that had been long treated as same var. caerulea of A. arvensis. It was only in 1972 that Fergussen established it to be a synonym of a distinct species Anagallis foemina Miller (1768). The plant List treats this as Anagallis arvensis subsp. foemina (Mill.) Schinz & Thell. Important to note that this taxon always has blue flowers. This is how the two species can be differentiated:
Anagallis arvensis                                                                 Anagallis foemina
1. Flowers scarlet (var. arvensis) or blue (var. caerulea)   1. Flowers blue
2. Pedicel in flower longer than subtending leaf.                2. Pedicel in flower shorter or equal to the subtending  
                                                                                                leaf.
3. Sepals shorter than petals especially in bud                  3. Sepals equalling or longer than petals especially in 
                                                                                                bud
4. Petal margins overlapping                                              4. Petal margins not overlapping
5. Petal margins with numerous hairs tipped with               5. Petal margins with few or no hairs, which if present 
    globose glands                                                                   have elongate terminal cells.

Let us look for our blue pimpernel (blue flowered Anagallis) more closely in light of above information to find its exact identity. Who knows we may have both taxa in India.



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Anagallis arvensis from Himachal [Mandi dist.; 900 m asl]
Anagallis arvensis from Uttarakhand [Dehradun; 900 m asl]

Kindly note the colour difference at the above two sites.
Also kindly update the nomenclature.


Very good close ups.

Anagallis arvensis subsp. caerulea, recorded in many Indian Floras as A. foemina in last few decades.



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Wanted to share these pics recorded from Panipat, please note the colour variation..


You can scrutinise it for A. amoena very close but petals not overlapping, shorter pedicels, but petals are much lighter.


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Anagallis arvensis L. is a common herb in winter and spring season in Pantnagar.

However, some individuals with weird morphology were noticed (photo-2,3). The flowers become terminal, pedicel /peduncles and flowers combine together and, interestingly, are fertile too.


Interesting post …


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Sharing pictures of Anagallis arvensis from Oman.

Yes typical A.arvensis as seen in spring season in northern India.


Thanks … This is from Oman. I did not see it during my visit to Uttarakhand. Saw very few flowers, guess it was not the flowering season.


Won’t be right to call it typical A. arvensis as typical one, that is A. arvensis subsp. arvensis, the scarlet pimpernel, plenty in our hill stations and other temperate climates. This one is the variant subsp. caerulea (often identified with A. foemina), the blue pimpernel. found in warmer climates.


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Plumbaginaceae and Primulaceae (Incl. Myrsinaceae) Fortnight- Anagallis arvensis ssp. caerulea- blue:: NS June 01 : 3 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (6).  This is a common weed at our place.. (Panipat)


Very attractive and bright colour. Good one … Somehow I am not able to find a single picture of Anagallis from my collection from western ghats.



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Anagallis arvensis var. caerulea (Family: Myrsinaceae).


Excellent photographs …



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Anagallis pumila Sw. SN Nov 11 : 4 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (3)

Anagallis pumila Sw from Krishnagiri dt of Tamilnadu


sorry, it is Anagalis arvensis only. Pumila will have white colour petals


Which one is this ?


It is Anagallis arvensis Jonkmari: The leaf juice of the plant is dropped into nostrils of cattle to expel out leeches, which enter into nostrils of cattle while drinking water from ponds, ditches and small water courses.



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ID Request 040215SG : 5 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (3)

Please help identify this bushy weed growing along with onion-weed in jowar field, spreading about 12-15” with 6-8” height.  Photo taken on 4Feb15 at Dhavlas, Maharashtra.


Plant in the photograph is Anagallis arvensis L. [Family PRIMULACEAE], please confirm


Yes, Anagallis arvensis L. to me too. However, FoP says there are two varieties – http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=5&taxon_id=200016886.



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Anagallis from NandiBetta nr Bangalore : 1 post by 1 author. 1 image.
Anagallis arvensis var caerulea from Nandibetta ( 4500 ft) nr Bangalore.
Growing in by side of garden, so may have been planted.
Following the earlier discussion, from the buds and petals it does not look like foemina.
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Blue Pimpernel ABAPR01/17 : 22 posts by 5 authors. Attachments (3)
I saw these tiny blue flowers in the lower town where I had gone to partake in a local feast. I tried to photograph it on my phone but was unable to do so properly on account of the flower being too small for a clear picture. I collected a sample and hoped that it didn’t wilt in the time it took me to reach home. It survived the journey and I made some photographs propping it up with a discarded cardboard box (hence the brown in the pictures).
I was tickled on finding that it was called the Blue Pimpernel and was useful as a weather indicator due to its propensity to close before bad weather. I have not yet asked the local shepherds if they use this ‘shepherd’s weather-glass’, but will do so soon. FOI website lists it (or a similar one) as Anagallis arvensis ssp. foemina. Alok Mahendroo ji’s excellent nature blog says Anagallis arvensis var. coerulea. Wikipedia cautions not to confuse the blue variation of A. arvensis with A. foemina (or Lysimachia formina) as they are categorised as different species after DNA studies.
I do not have the key to differentiate the two. Please advise.
Blue Pimpernel
Dharamshala, HP
1500m approx.

13 April 2015


I found a few more plants at Gaggal Airport and am sharing them here to confirm the ID if possible.
Gaggal Airport
1300m approx

18 April 2015


Pl. see Anagallis


Thank you very much … I am attaching here more photos to go with the key. Please advise if my understanding is correct;

The first sample, petals are longer than sepals and petal edges are minutely hairy like a torn paper.
The second sample from a different location shows pedicel longer than leaves.
Petals are overlapping
Can we conclude from this that the flower is A. arvensis var. caerulea?

I think you should be right.


This is a tough question, to differentiate the two taxa (or is it one?), in spite of eFI having a clear demarcation.
Flower character, length of pedicels etc are often overlapping. While sites like Lucid Central  or http://flowers2.la.coocan.jp/Myrsinaceae/Anagallis%20arvensis.htm or http://hirc.botanic.hr/fcd/DetaljiFrame.aspx?IdVrste=941 think all is same some other sites like the following links think otherwise –
  1. http://www.floravascular.com/index.php?spp=Anagallis%20foemina
  2. http://www.floravascular.com/index.php?spp=Anagallis%20arvensis
I think number of seeds may help – 10 to 23 in foemina and 20 to 35 in arvensis (caerulea L.).

Since pedicels in the attached pics are longer than the subtending leaves, and I prefer to follow FoC it is likely to be A. arvensis L.


I have discussed this in detail in my earlier post. Yours is clearly A. arvensis subsp. caerulea.


thank you … for the link

indeed it is/was a good thread and 2011 thread before that was also good


Thank you … It was from your post and the well-explained differences between A. arvensis and A. foemina that I had concluded my sample to be A. arvensis subsp. caerulea.


In systematics we say, if some characters overlap, we do not rely on single character, but a combination of characters.


“I think number of seeds may help – 10 to 23 in foemina and 20 to 35 in arvensis (caerulea L.).”

… that’s from above, in your answer…

my funny bone cant help it but ask…
if there are 24 seeds … what would the poor botany-splitter/classifier do..

climb the walls?


Thank you … for this detailed search. Indeed, it is difficult to tell from the pictures. I think we all seem to agree that my sample was Anagallis arvensis and not A. foemina (which was the major question to begin with).
Looking at …. clear keys on efi, I concluded that we had A. arvensis subsp. caerulea. Are we now seeing that the subsp. part may not be correct and that it should be Anagallis arvensis L.? I am assuming L stands for Latifolia here.
If both A. arvensis subsp. caerulea and A. arvensis L. are identical, isn’t the question then of a technicality–of whether the same should be called by either of these two names?
The note at the bottom of the KEW sample has A. arvensis L. var .… written on it and not A. foemina as indicated by you.

I may have understood it incorrectly and if I have, please correct me.


I know … i was underscoring the futility of relying on old literature
and i thought it was funny: the seed count, that’s all.
may be difference in numbers of seeds translates into a difference in size of the fruits? or the seeds?

of course botanical diagnosis is an art … like medical diagnosis


All the time I am telling that we need to examine a number of individuals in a given population when we try to identify critical species which have close look alike(S).
We need to examine several specimen of parts of a single individual as well. For example if we need to get detail on petiole, lamina etc of leaves of a species we can not but help collecting several leaves of an individual as well as several set of such specimen of a population to obtain accurate data.
Similarly you need to examine several fruits to get an avg. number. If the avg. is 24 you have several other features to examine.

Does it help your funny bones Didi?


When I write A. arvensis L. I mean Anagalls arvensis Linnaeus.
As for your concern regarding latifolia you may like to see http://plantillustrations.org/illustration.php?id_illustration=86648.
As for your question regarding caerulea please check
As for your question regarding KEW’s label in foemina herb. you need to check http://plants.jstor.org/stable/10.5555/al.ap.specimen.k000750810

Does this satisfies you?


One more time I copy my exact words which raised an unnecessary issue : “I think number of seeds may help – 10 to 23 in foemina and 20 to 35 in arvensis (caerulea L.).”

Do I need to explain the meaning of “may help”?


Re: [efloraofindia:221413] Blue Pimpernel ABAPR01/17 : 8 posts by 5 authors.

Thank you once again for taking the time to explain it patiently. The illustration in the first link is wonderful and shows a plant close to my sample.
I am still confused though. What does A. avensis L. represent–the scarlet variety or the blue one or both? Could we still call it a variation as in A. avensis L. var. caerulea?
So far I was only trying to see if it was A. avensis or A. foemina but now realise that it is more complicated than that (if I understand correctly, you are pointing out the possibility that these are the same taxa). What would be the most reliable standard to follow here?
This website treats A. arvensis L. and A. foemina Mill. as synonyms.

I am sorry if I annoy you with my ignorance but I sincerely do not know the answers to these questions.


I am equally ignorant …, if not more. You asked how to differentiate foemina and coerulea. …forwarded the thread to me. I searched and provided the probable answer based on various websites. All of those sites may be wrong. It is irrelevant now. For, you have KEY by … Incidentally, in my 1st reply mail I did mention that eFI (our group) had clear demarcation.
I do not know that if foemina is present in our country or not. Neither do I know if our species is var. coerulea. Again it is irrelevant now. You have KEY by …
I only wish to know if Anagallis caerulea L. is same species as A. latifolia L.
FoC thinks A. arvensis L. flower can be blue or red – http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200016886
FoP divides it depending on flower colour http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=5&taxon_id=200016886 but at the same time gives a note about latifolia in its A. arvensis var. coerulea page – http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=5&taxon_id=250081215.

Now, where could I find difference between latifolia and coerulea!


AANAGALLIS ARVENSIS, COMMONLY KNOWN AS Neeli ka phool &  Jonmari (Killer of snales) in Sanskrit.


Let us get it clear A. arvensis has orange or blue flowers with pedicels longer than subtending leaves, sepals shorter than petals especially in bud, petals erose with glandular tipped margin, petal margins overlapping, seeds 20-35. (both A. indica Sweet. and A. latifolia L. are its synonyms.

The plants growing at lower altitudes mainly tropics and lower subtropics have blue flowers and belong to var. caerulea
The plants growing in upper subtropical belt and temperate region have orange red flowers and belong to var. arvensis
Though earlier authors had confused all blue flowered form with A. foemina as it turns out latter is distinct with flowers blue (only), pedicel shorter or barely equalling subtending leaf, sepals equalling or longer than petals especially in bud, petal margins not overlapping, margins with no hairs or if few hairs are present their tips are elongated (not globose), seeds usually 12-18, rarely as low as 10 or as high as 23. We would be happy if any one discovers this species in India.

I hope that settles the confusion


Thank you Sir.

I still have confusion. The flowers of Anagallis latifolia L. are blue (corolla caerulea) while the flowers of Anagallis arvensis L. are red (phoeniceus). If A. latifolia can be a synonym of A. arvensis so can be A. caerulea. In that case why should we stress on var. coerulea or forma coerulea? Why not var. latifolia?

Attached here relevant documents and links –

Attachments (2)


do you by any chance have the DNA analysis paper handy
can you send it to me, please



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Fwd: ID Requested AK 090216-1 : 1 post by 1 author. Attachments (1)

Kindly help me to identify this flowering plant.
Location Dwarka, New Delhi
Date 07 February 2016

Anagallis arvensis var. caerulea



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id please GOBARDANGA,WB 14.1.2017 : 3 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (1)

GOBARDANGA, WB 14.1.2017


Deternined as: Anagallis arvensis


.


ID please : 3 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (3)
PFA Request For ID, Found Hover Fly (Syrphid fly) hovering on flowers.

This flower is Anagallis arvensis


Thanks, …, Anagallis arvensis var. caerulea as per images and keys herein.


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ID Please 1 : 3 posts by 1 author. Attachments (3)

PFA Request For ID, Found Hover Fly (Syrphid fly) hovering on flowers.

This flower is Anagallis arvensis


Anagallis arvensis var. caerulea as per images and keys herein.


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Herb for ID, Anuppur, Madhya Pradesh NAW-JAN19-02 : 6 posts by 4 authors. Attachments (4)

Kindly identify this herb with blue flowers growing in agricultural fields in Anuppur District, Madhya Pradesh, photographed in November 2018.

Anagalis arvensis (Primulaceae).

Please see and compare in eFI.

Yes from me also.  I have come across this plant.



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Herb for ID, Anuppur, Madhya Pradesh NAW-MAR19-03 : 6 posts by 4 authors. Attachments (5)

Kindly identify this herb with minute blue flowers and ribbed stems, photographed on agricultural fields in Anuppur district, Madhya Pradesh, in February 2019.


Seems to be Anagallis arvensis


scarlet pimpernel, only the flowers here are blue. what a coincidence i was reviewing something and this case had popped up  a few hours ago. that case is from Gujarat. My question to you …

where there many of these plants in the same locality and what kind of soil was it?

what is jungle, garden, fallow land or farming land?


Thanks, …, for the id.

It is Anagallis arvensis var. caerulea as per images and details herein.



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This flower interested me because of the combination of so many colours.
This was taken at Ranthampur National Park, when I was there there 24 to 26 Jan.2009
Please give ID


It looks like the Scarlet Pimpernel [Anagallis arvensis].


Scarlet Pimperil.



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SD010 7 Feb 2020 – Plant id assistance : 4 posts by 4 authors. Attachments (1)
Kindly help with plant ID.
Found near Neemrana, Rajasthan. Elevation 305 metres

Anagallis arvensis


The ID is correct. Now it is Lysimachia arvensis (L.) U.Manns & Anderb. of Primulaceae : blue variety.


Thanks, …, for the initial id.

It is Anagallis arvensis var. caerulea as per images and details herein.



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anagallis arvensis, dehradun, mm, april : 6 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (2).
anagallis arvensis
growing in a fallow field
a few kilometers from dehradun
second week of march


Is it Anagallis arvensis var. caerulea or Anagallis arvensis ssp. foemina ?


Anagallis arvensis –Jonkmari, Nili Ka phool

Leaf juice is dropped into the nostrils of cattle to expel out the leeches- hence LONKMARI.


This is what … has to say

The common pimpernel has confused both field workers and reputed authors alike, but luckily the confusion seems to have been resolved more recently. Carolus Linnaeus, the Father of Taxonomy described two closely related species of Anagallis:
Anagallis arvensis L., the scarlet pimpernel with orange-scarlet to scarlet flowers
Anagallis caerulea L., the blue pimpernel with blue flowers
The two are now treated as two varieties var. arvensis and var. caerulea (L.) Gouan of Anagallis arvensis L.
Schreber, Spic. Fl. Lips. 5 1771 described a related species Anagallis coerulea (note slight difference in spellings), also used by Lamarck, a taxon that had been long treated as same var. caerulea of A. arvensis. It was only in 1972 that Fergussen established it to be a synonym of a distinct species Anagallis foemina Miller (1768). The plant List treats this as Anagallis arvensis subsp. foemina (Mill.) Schinz & Thell. Important to note that this taxon always has blue flowers. This is how the two species can be differentiated:
Anagallis arvensis                                                                    Anagallis foemina
(or Anagallis arvensis subsp. arvensis)                             (or Anagallis arvensis subsp. foemina (Mill.) Schinz & Thell.)
1. Flowers scarlet (var. arvensis) or blue (var. caerulea)        1. Flowers blue
2. Pedicel in flower longer than subtending leaf.                      2. Pedicel in flower shorter or equal to the subtending leaf.
3. Sepals shorter than sepals especially in bud                       3. Sepals equalling or longer than petals especially in bud
4. Petal margins overlapping                                                      4. Petal margins not overlapping
5. Petal margins with numerous hairs tipped with                     5. With few or no hairs, which if present have elongate
    globose glands.                                                                             terminal cells.
Let us look for our blue pimpernel (blue flowered Anagallis) more closely in light of above information to find its exact identity. Who knows we may have both taxa in India.
I would be delighted if this could be ided further
1. Both the  flowers are blue
2. The pedicel is longer than the subtending leaf
3. sepal seems longer?  than the petal in bud,  but not after the flower has opened
4. petals are not overlapping or very slightly overlapping.

5. petal margins have very few hairs.


I think A. arvensis var. caerulea only, A. foemina is distinct as can be seen here

.

References:

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