Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Slovakia, France, Germany,
Greece, Switzerland, Hungary, Italy, Serbia & Kosovo, ?Montenegro,
?Macedonia, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia & Hercegovina, Poland, Romania,
+Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, C-, W- & E-European Russia, Belarus, Ukraine,
Moldavia, European Turkey, Northern Caucasus, Siberia (W-Siberia), USA (I)
(Connecticut (I), Maine (I), Michigan (I), Minnesota (I), New Hampshire (I), New
York (I), Ohio (I), Vermont (I)), Canada (I) (Ontario (I))
as per Catalogue of Life;
 
A perennial herb growing up to 1.5 m tall with ovate lanceolate finely serrulate leaves and darker yellow 2.5-3.5 cm long bell-shaped  flowers specked with brown, carried on up to 60 cm long spikes.
Digitalis grandiflora may sometimes be confused with D. lutea the Straw foxglove, which however is shorter, with narrower leaves, pale yellow up to 2 cm long and narrower flowers with tube almost of same breadth throughout.   


Digitalis grandiflora (Big-flowered foxglove, Large yellow foxglove) is a species of flowering plant in the genus Digitalis, family Plantaginaceae (formerly Scrophulariaceae). It is native to southern Europe and Asia.

In mountains it grows on warm, bushy slopes or areas left after logging.
It is an herbaceous biennial or perennial plant with glossy green, veined leaves, whose flowering stem can reach a height of 70–120 cm (28–47 in). The pale yellow bell-shaped flowers are spaced out on the stem, 3–4 cm (1–2 in) long and show a netted brown marking in their interior.[1]
As the plant contains cardenolides all parts are toxic. Its leaves contain 0.2% glycosides of the digitoxin-type and about 0,1% of the digoxin-type. Even so the plant is not used in the production of cardiac glycosides.
(From Wikipedia on 9.8.13)

  

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Digitalis grandiflora from Kashmir: Digitalis grandiflora Mill., Gard. Dict. ed. 8 4 corr. 1768.
syn: Digitalis flava Georgi; D. ochroleuca Jacq.; D. ambigua Murray Common name: Yellow foxglove, large yellow foxglove
A perennial herb growing up to 1.5 m tall with ovate lanceolate finely serrulate leaves and darker yellow 2.5-3.5 cm long bell-shaped  flowers specked with brown, carried on up to 60 cm long spikes.
May sometimes be confused with D. lutea the Straw foxglove, which however is shorter, with narrower leaves, pale yellow up to 2 cm long and narrower flowers with tube almost of same breadth throughout. 

 
Digitalis grandiflora Mill., Gard. Dict. ed. 8 4 corr. 1768.

syn: Digitalis flava Georgi; D. ochroleuca Jacq.; D. ambigua Murray
Common name: Yellow foxglove, large yellow foxglove
A perennial herb growing up to 1.5 m tall with ovate lanceolate finely serrulate leaves and darker yellow 4-5 cm long bell-shaped  flowers specked with brown, carried on up to 60 cm long spikes.
May sometimes be confused with D. lutea the Straw foxglove, which however is shorter, with narrower leaves, pale yellow up to 2 cm long and narrower flowers with tube almost of same breadth throughout.


Pics are not attached sir..


 

 

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Fwd: Digitalis grandiflora naturalised in Kashmir : 1 post by 1 author. Attachments (4)

During my last visit to Kashmir I came across this naturalised foxglove near to Gulmarg when walking down a nullah from Khelanmarg.
Seems to be D.grandiflora – though this species is not mentioned by Stewart (1972) nor by Naqshi, Singh & Koul (Plants of Gulmarg, 1984).   Cannot be D.purpurea or D.lanata – unlikely to be mistaken for these.
This is odd as Phillips & Rix within ‘Perennials’ Vol 2 Late Perennials include a photo of Digitalis grandiflora naturalised in Kashmir!   So clearly, it was known that this species was found in Kashmir.
Presumably just missed by botanists in Kashmir, rather than mistaken for D.lanata.
See attached.


  
 
References:

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