Peltophorum africanum Sond.;
 

The Weeping wattle (Peltophorum africanum) is a semi-deciduous to deciduous flowering tree growing to about 15 meters tall.

 It is native to Africa south of the equator. Their yellow flowers bloom on the ends of branches in upright, showy sprays.[1]  
Other common names include Rhodesian blackwood, African blackwood, African wattle, African false wattle, Rhodesian wattle and Rhodesian black wattle.[2]  
(From Wikipedia on 29.12.13)

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Is it Peltophorum africanum ?


Yes, it looks like Peltophorum africanum. But I wished there was a photo of fully opened yellow flowers.

Fruit and leaves look like that of P. africanum.


I will post more photos when it blooms fully.


 

 

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Trees of Lalbagh, Bangalore – RA – Peltophorum africanum, Sond. <=> African Wattle Tree: Peltophorum africanum is a small to medium-size semi-deciduous to deciduous tree of about 15Ft to 30 Ft tall, with a spreading crown, frequently branched from near the ground or 2- to 3-stemmed from ground level; bark smooth and grey on the young branches; twigs covered in reddish-brown hairs, but brown to grey and rough with lengthwise grooves on older branches and stems.
Leaves alternate, compound, bipinnate, with 4-7 pairs of pinnae, each bearing up to 23 pairs of feathery leaflets; leaflets oblong, variable in size, dull green top side, pale green underside; apex rounded with a fine, hairlike tip; base asymmetric; margin entire; petiole and rachis covered with dense, rusty brown, velvety hairs; stipule distinctive in appearance, like small compound leaves, but falling early; when not in flower P. africanum can easily be confused with an acacia tree, except that it is completely without thorns.
Flowers 7″ long; all floral parts in 5s; flower stalks and the backs of sepals covered with brown, velvety hairs; petals about .5″ in diameter, bright yellow and crinkled. The flowers are a source of pollen for bees.
Fruit a flat pod, elliptic, tapering to apex and base, up to 5″ x 1″ with a winglike margin, very thinly woody, almost leathery, greyish-brown or yellow-tan and ripening to a dark brown, hanging in dense clusters.

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Peltophorum : 15 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (3)

Kindly identify the species of Peltophorum; is it P. dubium or P. africanum? The plant is growing in Delhi and flowers in August/September. How does one differentiate between the two species?

Why not /species/a—l/f/fabaceae/peltophorum/peltophorum-pterocarpum


Peltophorum pterocarpum has distinctly brown flower buds because of brown hairs on the outer surface of sepals. Also the apices of leaflets are notched. Attached a photo.
In photos I sent in my earlier post, the flower buds are yellow and apices of leaflets are pointed, so definitely not P. pterocarpum.
Attachments (1) – 1 MB


Pl. check with images at 

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It must either be Peltophorum africanum or Pdubium. Both the species are found in Delhi. I am unable to distinguish between the two and need help there.  


The surest way of discriminating between these Peltophorums is from the stipules (pls see my treatment of Peltophorum in Trees of Delhi). I’d like to see a close up of the stipule before being sure…


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Thank you … I had gone through your book “Trees of Delhi” but could not find description of Peltophorum dubium. So have not found answer to my question yet; how does one differentiate between P. dubium and P. africanum? 

I have attached photos of stipules and fruits. Look very like those of P. africanum.
Attachments (3)

May I request you to pl. give your final word for species id.


I looked up Peltophorum when I got back last night. There appear to be 2 distinct species with branched stipules: One is the African wattle (P. africanum) and the other is P. dasyrrachis

I am sending you something from Notes I took on this latter species, which might be of interest: MOBOT lists Peltophorum dasyrrhachis var. tonkinensis (Pierre) K. Larsen & S.S. Larsen
Flora of Tropical east Africa – Says there are 3 species cultivated in East Africa, with similar yellow flowers and a peltate stigma, and a flattened indehiscent pod winged along both sutures…
The differences are:-
Peltophorum africanum Sond. – native of southern tropical and South Africa, with 10-28 pairs of leaflets per pinna – the leaflets mucronate at apex and about 0.3-1(-1.2) cm long x 0.1-0.45 cm wide; pedicels at flowering time about 1-1.5 times as long as the calyx.
Peltophorum dasyrhachis (Miq.) Bak. – native of tropical Asia; foliage as in P. pterocarpum, subulately branched stipules, lateral unbranched racemes and pedicels +/- 3-4 times as long as its calyx.
Peltophorum pterocarpum (DC.) K. Heyne [syn. P. ferrugineum (Decne.) Benth.; P. inerme (Roxb.) Naves; P. roxburghii (G.Don) Degener – native of tropical Asia & Australia, with 10-19 pairs of leaflets per pinna which are emarginate and without a mucro at apex; +/- 0.8-3 cm long x 0.35-0.9 cm wide; small unbranched stipules; racemes aggregated into a terminal panicle; pedicels at flowering time at most as long as the calyx. 
I hope this helps and doesn’t cause more confusion!


Thank you … It does not look like P. dasyrhachis as the pedicels are as long as the sepals/calyx (attached photo). What about P. dubium? I am not able to access any information on this particular species. 

Attachments (1)


 

Peltophorum Species seen at Lalbagh earlier.

I’m sorry don’t have any close ups.

Pl. check 


Unable to arrive at the ID whether it is P.africanum or P.pterocarpum.

For me it looks … ID is correct. I had a doubt as there was no close up. 

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Tree for Identification, Pachmarhi :: -NS Dec 18- 01 : 8 posts by 4 authors. Attachments (5)
Please suggest identification of this tree, recorded from Pachmarhi, M.P. in August 2016..

Identification update: this can be Peltophorum duniya… 


Please read as Peltophorum dubium..

We do not have any observation of Peltophorum dubium (Florida, USA) from India.
But have many observations of Peltophorum africanum (Cultivated). To me appears close to it.
Pl. check.

Sometime back I had posted photos of a similar looking plant from Delhi and sort of identified it as Peltophorum africanum.

References:

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