Cotoneaster marginatus (Lindl. ex Loudon) Schltdl., 541 1854. (syn: Cotoneaster lanatus Jacques; Pyrus immortalis M. F. Fay & Christenh.); 
India (Himachal Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh), Nepal as per Catalogue of Life;

 /wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN7995.JPG

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSCN7998-0.JPG

Cotoneaster microphyllus 3 AT NOV 2016/03 : 2 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (2)

Cotoneaster microphyllus
Taradevi Temple, Shimla,  H.P.
Altitude: Approx. 2250m
April 2015
I am posting different populations separately.

It was good indeed that you posted different ‘populations’ separately as this is a different species as well.
According to Jeanette Fryer whilst this is part of the MICROPHYLLI Section, it is NOT Cotoneaster microphyllus.  It is C.marginatus Lindley ex Loudon which is also new to eFI.
This species has been recorded from H.P., Uttarakhand and Nepal.  According to Fryer & Hylmo, it was introduced into cultivation in 1838.  Often hybridizing with other diploid species, it can produce very variable off spring, some of which have previously been attributed to other species.  It caused much confusion before its diploid nature was realised. C.marginatus is vigorous growing, often forming a dense mass of branches which project from the shrub in all directions.  The abundant fruit are slow-ripening and hence are not taken by birds until well into winter.


Thank you for all your efforts in bringing the real identity of my postings on Cotoneaster species from H.P.
This species has not been recorded in the Flora of Himachal Pradesh, although, Flora of Himachal Pradesh includes 24 species. It is quite possible that it might have been mixed with C. microphallus and some similar looking species.
I do not have access to the scholarly work of Jennette on “Cotoneasters: A Comprehensive Guide to Shrubs for Flowers, Fruit, and Foliage”. So, I am not able to differentiate between these three populations photographed at 3 three different localities. I have one more photograph of this plant from lower altitude as well. I’ll try to post that one also when the time permits.  
It will be very nice of you, if you could kindly post the species description of my my postings as per new IDs. This will be useful for me as well as others to identify these very difficult to identify plants.


Could you give me the full reference for ‘Flora of Himachal Pradesh’ with exact name, authors and year of publication? 
There is still a long way to go in studying the Cotoneasters of the Himalaya.
I consider it acceptable to comment upon and use short extracts from sources such as floras but for copyright and other reasons, I am not in a position to copy and send FULL descriptions of species from the Fryer & Hylmo book.
Since we currently have access (through me) to the services of Jeanette Fryer, the way forward is to take many more images of ALL Cotoneasters encountered, so a comprehensive and reliable set of images is available on the eFI data-base.
These can be sent for her to DETERMINE.  Whilst we have access to someone with specialist knowledge of the genus, then let us TAKE FULL ADVANTAGE. Rather than spend (and probably waste) time ATEMPTING to name material ourselves. As you will realise, some specimens can
be tough to name with confidence, even for those with specialist knowledge.
Kindly follow my advice (see: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/indiantreepix/vD9SHWdzVds) – being sure to photograph sterile shoots as well, which is not an obvious thing to do.


Flora of Himachal Pradesh has been compiled by bH.J. Chowdhery and B.M. Wadhwa from BSI in 1984. Although, it includes most of the plants from H.P. lying in various herbaria of India, it lacks detailed descriptions of species. It includes only one or two line descriptions of plants and does not help in proper species identification.


As far as various Floras of H.P. are concerned, C.marginatus Lindley ex Loudon is new species for the Flora of H.P.
This season, I’ll try to collect more information on this genus from H.P. But, it will be difficult for me to differentiate between different species, unless I have some of their differentiating features. Kindly give some extracts or keys to the Cotoneaster species from NW Himalaya.


 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Cotoneaster%20microphyllus-fruit.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Cotoneaster%20microphyllus.JPG
Rosaceae Fortnight- Cotoneaster microphyllus from Himachal-GSG24/Sept 2015 : 1 post by 1 author. 2 images. Cotoneaster microphyllus


Jeanette Fryer has named this as Cotoneaster marginatus Lindley ex Loudon Series Microphylii NOT C.microphyllus – which as other posts have indicated is, strictly speaking, only recorded from Nepal.
C.marginatus has been recorded from H.P., Uttarakhand and Nepal. 


Thanks for getting the correct identity of the species in my post. As suggested, I’ll try to click more photographs of this group in my future forays in its habitat.


Good. It will be most help (and much-needed) to have more images of as many taxa of Cotoneaster as can be located both in flower and fruit.   Such contributions will help towards a better understanding of
the genus in the Himalaya.   Such input is especially important with ‘difficult’ genera.
Please follow my guide-lines being sure to include images of STERILE shoots as well. This is not something
one would automatically think of doing.
As all the species considered C. microphyllus has been found to be misidentified by Cotoneaster expert Prof. Jennette Fryer, it would be desirable to have key or some descriptions to the species of NW Himalaya. We have to look for Cotoneaster species from different angles now onwards. Cotoneaster and Berberis are quite confusing Himalayan genera that need relook and development of keys for easy identification.
We shall try to photograph Cotoneasters again as suggested by you in different link.


I shall be posting a lot more about Cotoneaster – with many images of other species but there is NO prospect of  EASY identification of either Cotoneaster or Berberis.
I am NOT keen on most keys. Keys are FREQUENTLY used poorly. Over-reliance on keys contributes to misidentifications. I shall be explaining more on this subject in due course. Compiling GOOD keys is VERY difficult and VERY time-consuming.
Some genera will ALWAYS present challenges identification-wise.
Perhaps, 50-100 years in the future, Himalayan flora MIGHT be better-known, approaching the level of understanding of British flora (though this is based upon input over CENTURIES by THOUSANDS of botanists – and we have fewer species, less massive mountains and less difficult terrain to contend with).
I will have long since departed this world.
Even with all this, in the UK we have REFEREES and SPECIALISTS for more difficult genera incl. Cotoneaster (albeit that almost all Cotoneasters one comes across in the UK are either cultivated or naturalised).
Indeed there is only 1 native species in the UK – C.integerrimus Medic.
The (now old) ‘Flora of the British Isles’ listed C.simonsii Baker as naturalized in many places – this species is native to what was known as the Khasia Hills (now Meghalaya).


/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/_MG_9601_08May2016.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/_MG_9592_08May2016.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/_MG_9598_08May2016.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/_MG_1835_15May2016.jpg

Cotoneaster rotundifolia ABMAY01/15 : 3 posts by 2 authors. 4 images

Cotoneaster rotundifolia—Please advise.
Above Mcleodganj, Dharamshala, HP
1850m
8th and 15 May 2016


Cotoneaster species in eFloraofindia (with details/ keys from published papers/ regional floras/ FRLHT/ FOI/ Biotik/ efloras/ books etc., where ever available on net)    
I think it seems to match with images at FOI   


This is not Cotoneaster rotundifolius which according to Fryer has dark red flowers with a pink border & is found in Nepal.

I am beginning a check on Cotoneasters posted on this site. Unfortunately, I suspect a majority are misidentified. Will be sending available images to Jeanette Fryer (on a CD she does not use e-mail).  She was co-author with the late Bertil Hylmo of ‘Cotoneasters’ (2009) – the most knowledgeable person on the genus. She is always busy with other identification tasks so will certainly take weeks perhaps months before we hear but worth the wait. 

I hope her determinations (accurate identifications) will encourage members to take a greater interest in this neglected genus, photographing more species.   There is every possibility of locating species new to science within this genus. 

It makes sense, when those with specialist knowledge are available to name material to take full advantage. The present situation with the naming of Cotoneaters in Indian herbaria is in need of improvement. Many specimens are very old and/or in poor condition, of a scrappy nature in the first place.


I find these close to images of … from Himachal Pradesh at Cotoneaster marginatus (Lindl. ex Loudon) Schltdl.


/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/zfVJmdJ0WzoCz77I7JjdTAXza7emW-Fy1j-svOpLRotgdYXd-VIv4OhKxJXkbpJVGtkyHK94foHpYHzW3_ibH-C8BkdUtMwLyTh3YeV2ucBh-w5000-h5000.jpg

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/jnzZHvjYDCvBZGY0B-fE41lvi5ZFxz1mFB-UaCVzCXHZ8f1ql71oXNv-cpFcWAJOJI0TKBCbbGeXlpvcax2ZuTc9egy5C2VdD2fYRB2DEnQN-w5000-h5000.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/8-lZpXQCOkS1rcmv77ETH5dBlv5mCeE50KlnKQipLTsqlIBU6BpkOpnM87YNHZr0GcKDegiljySqTQvYMcoi1VPVXuhlIuW4jVyhbpS0FAWn-w5000-h5000.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/7775745836_63325de066_k.jpg

DV :: 31 JUL 12 – 0108 :: small-leaved bush at Auli: 31 JUL 12
Auli8750 – 9000 ft

Habitat: sloping meadow
Habit: bushy shrub, not able to recall height


Hope Cotoneaster microphyllus


I find these close to images of … from Himachal Pradesh at Cotoneaster marginatus (Lindl. ex Loudon) Schltdl.


Thank you very much, … Revised my notes at flickr.


   

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Slide86.JPG
Cotoneaster microphyllus Wall. ex Lindl. Bot. Reg. 13: pl. 1114 pl. 1114 1827.
Family: ROSACEAE
Current Location: Valley of Flwoers, Uttarakhand.


I am beginning a check on Cotoneasters posted on this site. Unfortunately, I suspect a majority are misidentified. Will be sending available images to Jeanette Fryer (on a CD she does not use e-mail). She was co-author with the late Bertil Hylmo of ‘Cotoneasters’ (2009) – the most knowledgeable person on the genus.  She is always busy with other identification tasks so will certainly take weeks perhaps months before we hear but worth the wait. 

Please note her comments: “Klotz included within C.microphyllus a number of taxa from a wide area ranging from W.Himalaya, Kumaon, through to eastern Tibet and the provinces of Yunnan & Sichuan but in its strictest sense C.microphyllus has only been recorded from Nepal.  More research is desperately needed. 

I hope her determinations (accurate identifications) will encourage members to take a greater interest in this neglected genus, photographing more species.   There is every possibility of locating species new to science within this genus. 

It makes sense, when those with specialist knowledge are available to name material to take full advantage.  The present situation with the naming of Cotoneaters in Indian herbaria is in need of improvement.  Many specimens are very old and/or in poor condition, of a scrappy nature in the first place


I feel this image is more closer to images and discussions at Cotoneaster thymifolius hort. ex Baker 


On further scrutiny, I find this image (from VOF) more closer to images & discussions at Cotoneaster marginatus (Lindl. ex Loudon) Schltdl.


 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Cotoneaster%20microphyllus%20-2--9.JPG
Cotoneaster microphyllus from Ghangriya near Helipad


I am beginning a check on Cotoneasters posted on this site. Unfortunately, I suspect a majority are misidentified. Will be sending available images to Jeanette Fryer (on a CD she does not use e-mail). She was co-author with the late Bertil Hylmo of ‘Cotoneasters’ (2009) – the most knowledgeable person on the genus.  She is always busy with other identification tasks so will certainly take weeks perhaps months before we hear but worth the wait. 

Please note her comments: “Klotz included within C.microphyllus a number of taxa from a wide area ranging from W.Himalaya, Kumaon, through to eastern Tibet and the provinces of Yunnan & Sichuan but in its strictest sense C.microphyllus has only been recorded from Nepal.  More research is desperately needed. 

I hope her determinations (accurate identifications) will encourage members to take a greater interest in this neglected genus, photographing more species.   There is every possibility of locating species new to science within this genus. 

It makes sense, when those with specialist knowledge are available to name material to take full advantage.  The present situation with the naming of Cotoneaters in Indian herbaria is in need of improvement.  Many specimens are very old and/or in poor condition, of a scrappy nature in the first place.


I find these may be close to images & discussions at Cotoneaster marginatus (Lindl. ex Loudon) Schltdl.



/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/IMG_3728-9.jpg

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/IMG_3727.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/IMG_3723.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/IMG_3724.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/IMG_3725.jpg

VOF Week: Cotoneaster sp-3 ?? en-route Vasundhara falls:  This is the third Cotoneaster plant. This was seen en-route Vasundhara Falls... all of the three seem same to me unless you have found some differences among them. They must be Cotoneaster microphyllus. Let us wait for comments.U seems to be right, all the 3 could be Cotoneaster microphyllus…


Yes small sized leaf usually shorter than 2 cm, thick, recurved margins, single flower identifies with Cotoneaster microphylla, although in one of your uploads the fruit shape was different.

I am beginning a check on Cotoneasters posted on this site. Unfortunately, I suspect a majority are misidentified. Will be sending available images to Jeanette Fryer (on a CD she does not use e-mail). She was co-author with the late Bertil Hylmo of ‘Cotoneasters’ (2009) – the most knowledgeable person on the genus.  She is always busy with other identification tasks so will certainly take weeks perhaps months before we hear but worth the wait. 

Please note her comments: “Klotz included within C.microphyllus a number of taxa from a wide area ranging from W.Himalaya, Kumaon, through to eastern Tibet and the provinces of Yunnan & Sichuan but in its strictest sense C.microphyllus has only been recorded from Nepal.  More research is desperately needed. 

I hope her determinations (accurate identifications) will encourage members to take a greater interest in this neglected genus, photographing more species.   There is every possibility of locating species new to science within this genus. 

It makes sense, when those with specialist knowledge are available to name material to take full advantage.  The present situation with the naming of Cotoneaters in Indian herbaria is in need of improvement.  Many specimens are very old and/or in poor condition, of a scrappy nature in the first place.


I find these image more closer to images & discussions at Cotoneaster marginatus (Lindl. ex Loudon) Schltdl.



/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/IMG_2880.jpg

 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/IMG_2880c.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/IMG_2881.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/IMG_2878.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/IMG_2879-1.jpg

VOF Week: Cotoneaster sp-2 ?? from VoF: This is second Cotoneaster (?) plant from VoF.


I think C. microphylla only


Thanks …


I am beginning a check on Cotoneasters posted on this site. Unfortunately, I suspect a majority are misidentified. Will be sending available images to Jeanette Fryer (on a CD she does not use e-mail). She was co-author with the late Bertil Hylmo of ‘Cotoneasters’ (2009) – the most knowledgeable person on the genus.  She is always busy with other identification tasks so will certainly take weeks perhaps months before we hear but worth the wait. 

Please note her comments: “Klotz included within C.microphyllus a number of taxa from a wide area ranging from W.Himalaya, Kumaon, through to eastern Tibet and the provinces of Yunnan & Sichuan but in its strictest sense C.microphyllus has only been recorded from Nepal.  More research is desperately needed. 

I hope her determinations (accurate identifications) will encourage members to take a greater interest in this neglected genus, photographing more species.   There is every possibility of locating species new to science within this genus. 

It makes sense, when those with specialist knowledge are available to name material to take full advantage.  The present situation with the naming of Cotoneaters in Indian herbaria is in need of improvement.  Many specimens are very old and/or in poor condition, of a scrappy nature in the first place.


I find these image more closer to images & discussions at Cotoneaster marginatus (Lindl. ex Loudon) Schltdl.


 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/C.microphyllus_DSR_5-4.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/C.microphyllus_DSR_4.JPG

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/C.microphyllus_DSR_3.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/C.microphyllus_DSR_2.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/C.microphyllus_DSR_1.JPG
This dwarf shrub is a common element in subalpine and alpine zones of Uttarakhand. Plants are often creeping over boulders. The species is early bloomer and probably produce copious nectar which not only attracts flying insects but ants too. May be some flowers are pollinated by ants- myrmecophily!
Photographed in Badrinath area (3200m) in June. 

Wonderful photography.


I am beginning a check on Cotoneasters posted on this site. Unfortunately, I suspect a majority are misidentified. Will be sending available images to Jeanette Fryer (on a CD she does not use e-mail). She was co-author with the late Bertil Hylmo of ‘Cotoneasters’ (2009) – the most knowledgeable person on the genus.  She is always busy with other identification tasks so will certainly take weeks perhaps months before we hear but worth the wait. 

Please note her comments: “Klotz included within C.microphyllus a number of taxa from a wide area ranging from W.Himalaya, Kumaon, through to eastern Tibet and the provinces of Yunnan & Sichuan but in its strictest sense C.microphyllus has only been recorded from Nepal.  More research is desperately needed. 

I hope her determinations (accurate identifications) will encourage members to take a greater interest in this neglected genus, photographing more species.   There is every possibility of locating species new to science within this genus. 

It makes sense, when those with specialist knowledge are available to name material to take full advantage.  The present situation with the naming of Cotoneaters in Indian herbaria is in need of improvement.  Many specimens are very old and/or in poor condition, of a scrappy nature in the first place


I find these image more closer to images & discussions at Cotoneaster marginatus (Lindl. ex Loudon) Schltdl.


 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Cotoneaster%20microphyllus%201-2.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Cotoneaster%20microphyllus%202.JPG

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Cotoneaster%20microphyllus%203.JPG

Family: Rosaceae
Date: 24th May 2015
Place: Renuka Ji-Haripurdhar Route, Himachal Pradesh

Habit: Shrub


I am beginning a check on Cotoneasters posted on this site. Unfortunately, I suspect a majority are misidentified. Will be sending available images to Jeanette Fryer (on a CD she does not use e-mail). She was co-author with the late Bertil Hylmo of ‘Cotoneasters’ (2009) – the most knowledgeable person on the genus.  She is always busy with other identification tasks so will certainly take weeks perhaps months before we hear but worth the wait. 

Please note her comments: “Klotz included within C.microphyllus a number of taxa from a wide area ranging from W.Himalaya, Kumaon, through to eastern Tibet and the provinces of Yunnan & Sichuan but in its strictest sense C.microphyllus has only been recorded from Nepal.  More research is desperately needed. 

I hope her determinations (accurate identifications) will encourage members to take a greater interest in this neglected genus, photographing more species.   There is every possibility of locating species new to science within this genus. 

It makes sense, when those with specialist knowledge are available to name material to take full advantage.  The present situation with the naming of Cotoneaters in Indian herbaria is in need of improvement.  Many specimens are very old and/or in poor condition, of a scrappy nature in the first place.


I find these may be close to images & discussions at Cotoneaster marginatus (Lindl. ex Loudon) Schltdl.


Indeed, Cotoneasters are difficult to differentiate, particularly species resembling C. microphyllus
C. marginatus and C. microphyllus are differentiated by Pusalkar & Singh (2012) based on habit- C. marginatus being erect or suberect shrub while C. microphyllus being prostrate or procumbent shrub with dense branches. Following this simply suggest my images as C. microphyllus
Taxonomists are also confused in limiting these species as Flora of Nepal (2012) consider C. marginatus as a synonym of C. integrifolius.
I am not sure of the ID but prefer to call my images as C. microphyllus.


Thanks, …, I have based my id on id’s given by J. Fryer (who did monographic standard work on around 400 species of the genus in 2009) in some cases, which you can see at efi site links.


May I request you to pl. go through your complete post and other three posts identified by J. Fryer as C. marginatus and C. microphyllus and decide:

Pl. note the shape of the fruits in both species, which I think clearly stands out.


I have checked the images and agree with the ID indicated by J.Fryer (vide Mr Chadwell) as C. marginatus. It is interesting that all most all the flora related to Uttarakhand have mentioned presence of C. microphyllus (but in broader sense, thus including few similar species). One relatively recent and good flora (Flora of Gangotri National Park by Pusalkar and Singh 2012) has mentioned both species (C. microphyllus and C. marginatus) in Uttarakhand. This follows (probably) the multivolume monographic work of Dr Panigrahi and his associated workers on Rosaceae of India in 1990s.



 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/lNUft3kedn66kknphV5_9BW4w3RKbm3YsSAgnZ0rkbW49xbr5fHbNxOHc9AuEZZpV_CdmkIYZQ3yjs8I59uMNR0L6F9Ka5Cek4sXGMThDnA-w5000-h5000.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Bu5Z6uI743x-8jtUCoIx3Gk38VfgB7BN4M4FdTZODuNZai9XPRMGM9_yZY3G5CB6QYQO0kW7FObvsz6BaiBmQZ0TLMDenaBcUNcHdQEruUc-w5000-h5000.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/obBHiIa5wLUsbyaLAajIgjb3iVfuCaFysAxXJiEDY_jA_7iD8ipkQJ66wj4oNFo9Ng5RIsGcVhqxmvyaBXAIL9vn2imweA6PTWzNweqQqvQ-w5000-h5000.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/4Pj6D8d6njdsgczO-ixeL5Qd8NnymHzUWZchPVX2Sik6w7LQjPepY7K2wP4oVdOi3-zd2cQq_6zof1ZI0ayBgBb1NXPgj_Cbv5BzR89ILxQ-w5000-h5000.jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/0q3_7PHkaOU1SFdm2Hk25mh8oYw-hM65JVm8W_cA-ILlPknlxfoVbNnB_rF7WTdX3elfXWtqBjnuPrho531IWhbOLr3QOx5PSUmMKjVUT-E-w5000-h5000.jpg
Cotoneaster microphyllus Wall. ex Lindl.
at Auli on July 31, 2012


Nice beginning …, thanks for sharing this dominating species.. a favourite for butterflies and other insects !!


…, images are Nicely arranged and clarities are more clear! correctly identified.


I am beginning a check on Cotoneasters posted on this site. Unfortunately, I suspect a majority are misidentified. Will be sending available images to Jeanette Fryer (on a CD she does not use e-mail). She was co-author with the late Bertil Hylmo of ‘Cotoneasters’ (2009) – the most knowledgeable person on the genus.  She is always busy with other identification tasks so will certainly take weeks perhaps months before we hear but worth the wait. 

Please note her comments: “Klotz included within C.microphyllus a number of taxa from a wide area ranging from W.Himalaya, Kumaon, through to eastern Tibet and the provinces of Yunnan & Sichuan but in its strictest sense C.microphyllus has only been recorded from Nepal.  More research is desperately needed. 

I hope her determinations (accurate identifications) will encourage members to take a greater interest in this neglected genus, photographing more species.   There is every possibility of locating species new to science within this genus. 

It makes sense, when those with specialist knowledge are available to name material to take full advantage.  The present situation with the naming of Cotoneaters in Indian herbaria is in need of improvement.  Many specimens are very old and/or in poor condition, of a scrappy nature in the first place


I find these image more closer to images & discussions at Cotoneaster marginatus (Lindl. ex Loudon) Schltdl.



 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/C.microphyllus_DSR_1-5.JPG
Cotoneaster microphyllus Wall. ex Lindl. is a common shrub in subalpine and alpine zones of Uttarakhand. Often found prostrate over the rocks covering it.
Photographed in Badrinath area in June 2015


I find these image more closer to images & discussions at Cotoneaster marginatus (Lindl. ex Loudon) Schltdl.


Cotoneaster microphyllus Wall. ex Lindl.
at Valley of Flowers on August 2, 2012
at Auli on July 31, 2012 


I am beginning a check on Cotoneasters posted on this site. Unfortunately, I suspect a majority are misidentified. Will be sending available images to Jeanette Fryer (on a CD she does not use e-mail). She was co-author with the late Bertil Hylmo of ‘Cotoneasters’ (2009) – the most knowledgeable person on the genus.  She is always busy with other identification tasks so will certainly take weeks perhaps months before we hear but worth the wait. 

Please note her comments: “Klotz included within C.microphyllus a number of taxa from a wide area ranging from W.Himalaya, Kumaon, through to eastern Tibet and the provinces of Yunnan & Sichuan but in its strictest sense C.microphyllus has only been recorded from Nepal.  More research is desperately needed. 

I hope her determinations (accurate identifications) will encourage members to take a greater interest in this neglected genus, photographing more species.   There is every possibility of locating species new to science within this genus. 

It makes sense, when those with specialist knowledge are available to name material to take full advantage.  The present situation with the naming of Cotoneaters in Indian herbaria is in need of improvement.  Many specimens are very old and/or in poor condition, of a scrappy nature in the first place


I find these image more closer to images & discussions at Cotoneaster marginatus (Lindl. ex Loudon) Schltdl.


Thank you very much, … Revised my notes at flickr.


/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Cotoneaster%20microphyllus%20Rosaceae..jpg
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Cotoneaster%20microphyllus%20Rosaceae..%20-2-.jpg
id confirmation UP-HP -1-1 : 2 posts by 1 author. Attachments (2)
id of the Cotoneaster sp pl, seen at Himachal Pradesh, last photo id confirmation whether Cotoneaster or Spiraea ?

I think Cotoneaster species. 


Reply from another thread:
“… has identified/ corrected my similar looking Cotoneasters and put them in three different species. Earlier, I  also thought similar looking plants as C. microphyllus.
I am still not able to understand why and how they differ from each others as I have no literature on this genus expect a few Indian books.”

I find these may be close to images & discussions at Cotoneaster marginatus (Lindl. ex Loudon) Schltdl.


 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Cotoneaster%20microphyllus_VOF%20GGIMG_0141.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/COtoneaster%20microphyllusIMG_1038.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Cotoneaster%20microphyllusIMG_0920.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Cotoneaster%20microphyllusIMG_0292.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Cotoneaster%20microphyllusIMG_0921.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Cotoneaster%20microphyllus_VOF%20GGIMG_0142.JPG
Saw this along the Govindghat-Ghangaria trail nearer to Ghangaria, Uttarakhand in Aug 2018.
Requested to please provide ID, is this Cotoneaster microphyllus?.

Thanks, …, Efi page available at 

C. integrifolius ? It is always difficult for me to differentiate 

between these two.
By the way it is advisable to give elevation ein every post.

…, this should have been around 2800-2900 mts, much nearer to the Ghangaria helipad. The altitude has been assumed based on Google maps.

Pl. check with images and details at efi pages at

Fruiting images look different from Cotoneaster integrifolius ?

I find these image more closer to images & discussions at Cotoneaster marginatus (Lindl. ex Loudon) Schltdl.


 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/IMG_2597-1-8.jpg

I had seen Cotoneaster plant (Family: Rosaceae) at 3 locations, 2 plants at VoF and one en-route Vasundhara falls. I am sharing all 3 in 3 separate posts.
This was spotted at VoF.


thanks for the three contoneasters…
in the third I can believe it is related to hawthorn berries…
all three are nice pic sets


Leaf size and single flower suggests C. microphylla, but fruit shape is different.


Thanks for posting the nice pictures of Cotoneaster. Earlier I posted a few pictures of Cotoneaster species from California near University of Berkely ( very common species).


Those leaves are very different from the plants i know as Cotoneaster microphyllus. Eflora of China gives lot of varieties !!


I find these image more closer to images & discussions at Cotoneaster marginatus (Lindl. ex Loudon) Schltdl.


 

/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSC_0109-4-0.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSC_0107-9-3.JPG
/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/DSC_0108-3-2.JPG
SK299JAN05-2016:ID3 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (3)
Location: Kuri, Kalinchowk, Nepal
Altitude: 10000 ft.
Date: 26 July 2014
Cotoneaster  ….???


Yes, Cotoneaster. This is another genus that has been poorly studied. I sent by CD the images of Cotoneasters posted on eFI to Jeanette Fryer in UK.  She does not use e-mail.  I expected it would take weeks if not months before a response – she always has a back-log of specimens and photos to identify. WHEN these arrive then we can begin to improve the reference examples on this site.  I will store your images from Kuri and accumulate more THEN, IF she is willing to name other photos, will send on another CD.
In the mean-time, no point in speculating as to the identity of this. It seems you had a water droplet or similar on the lens – a common problem when photographing under wet conditions.


I think more closer to images at Cotoneaster marginatus (Lindl. ex Loudon) Schltdl.


Big difference in elevation.


Lot must have changed after J. Fryer’s book in 2009.


References:

Catalogue of Life  The Plant List Ver.1.1
 Tropicos  Flora of China (syn. of Cotoneaster buxifolius var. marginatus Loudon)
Flora of Nepal – On-line accounts (syn. of Cotoneaster integrifolius (Roxb.) Klotz)  British Wild Plant 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *