Large Leaf Primrose;
A robust plant. Leaves: Narrow lanceolate or strap shaped erect, entire or toothed 10-30cm usually with white farina(Powder like) beneath. Flowers 5-25 purple Lilac usually with a darker eye. Petals elliptic to ovate entire.

 

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Valley of Flowers1– Picture taken in Valley Of Flowers, Uttaranchal in June 2007:
(18.12.10, 1 pictures, 3 messages); 

I consider this has been correctly identified but apply a slightly different name drawing attention to the unpublished research of Professor Arve Elvebakk, University of Tromso, Norway (Curator of Tromso Arctic-Alpine Botanic Garden). The PRIMULA MACROPHYLLA (sensu lato – meaning in the broad sense) COMPLEX has troubled botanists and specialist growers for more than a century. 

Elvebakk has recognised a separate taxon/species Primula meeboldii (honouring the German botanist who first collected pressed specimens of this on high passes in Ladakh in the 19th Century).  It has pinkish flowers and occurs in Ladakh and some other regions.  Hopefully the full details will be published in the not-too-distant future. 

Anyhow, I am in support of the separation of P.meeboldii at species level, along with P.macrophylla sensu stricto (in the strict sense) and Primula moorcroftiana as separate species. 

The image taken in Himachal Pradesh fits with what I currently consider to be typical Primula macrophylla* (syn. Primula macrophylla var. macrophylla). I have observed both P.macrophylla and P.moorcroftiana on the Rohtang. P.moorcrotiana is mostly found from 4000-4500m (I have not been higher but it may well grow at higher altitudes) whereas P.macrophylla is mostly found between 3000-3600m. 

I have found Primula macrophylla sensu stricto to vary a lot – so may well be subdivided at some point but the plant photographed in the VOF is not Primula moorcroftiana nor P.meeboldii nor matches the unknown(s) in Kashmir.

Please note that I have observed and photographed Primulas of this complex in the Kashmir Valley which do not fit either P.moorcroftiana, P.macrophylla or P.meeboldii – thus at least one more taxon is involved.


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Flora of Uttarakhand- Herb8 for Id- JM – efloraofindia | Google Groups

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VoF Week: Primulaceae – Primula macrophylla var. moorcroftiana (Wallich ex Klatt) W. W. Smith & H. R. Fletcher:

Primula macrophylla var. moorcroftiana (Wallich ex Klatt) W. W. Smith & H. R. Fletcher, Trans. Roy. Soc. Edinburgh. 60: 590. 1942.
Synonym:
Primula moorcroftiana Wallich ex Klatt, J. Bot. 6: 120. 1868.
Family: PRIMULACEAE

Current pic taken just below the main Gurudwara of Hem Kunt Sahib.


I think your two pics got interchanged. This one with entire petals is Primula macrophylla, and the one with two-lobed petals is Primula macrophylla var. moorcroftiana


Sorry … sir, budhape me galatiya hoon jaati hai…. 🙁 You are right, this is Primula macrophylla var. macrophylla. !!


I consider this has been correctly identified but apply a slightly different name drawing attention to the unpublished research of Professor Arve Elvebakk, University of Tromso, Norway (Curator of Tromso Arctic-Alpine Botanic Garden). The PRIMULA MACROPHYLLA (sensu lato – meaning in the broad sense) COMPLEX has troubled botanists and specialist growers for more than a century. 

Elvebakk has recognised a separate taxon/species Primula meeboldii (honouring the German botanist who first collected pressed specimens of this on high passes in Ladakh in the 19th Century).  It has pinkish flowers and occurs in Ladakh and some other regions.  Hopefully the full details will be published in the not-too-distant future. 

Anyhow, I am in support of the separation of P.meeboldii at species level, along with P.macrophylla sensu stricto (in the strict sense) and Primula moorcroftiana as separate species. 

The image taken in Himachal Pradesh fit with what I currently consider to be typical Primula macrophylla* (syn. Primula macrophylla var. macrophylla).  I have observed both P.macrophylla and P.moorcroftiana on the Rohtang.  P.moorcrotiana is mostly found from 4000-4500m (I have not been higher but it may well grow at higher altitudes) whereas P.macrophylla is mostly found between 3000-3600m. 

Please note that I have observed and photographed Primulas of this complex in the Kashmir Valley which do not fit either P.moorcroftiana, P.macrophylla or P.meeboldii – thus at least one more taxon is involved.


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VoF Week: 19092012 BS 20 Herb for id from way to Hemkund Sahib:

This herb was shot from the way to Hemkund sahib

Only fruits were seen


It looks fruits of Primula macrophylla.


I also think P. macrophylla


I shall comment about this later.  See my recent posts about PRIMULA MACROPHYLLA, PRIMULA MOORCROFTIAN, PRIMULA MEEBOLDII and PRIMULA SP. UNIDENTIFIED FROM KASHMIR.

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VoF Week :: DV :: 03 AUG 12 – 1231 :: faded blue flowered herb along Hemakund – Ghangaria trail: 3 AUG 12
Hemakund – Ghangaria trail about 13500 ft
Habitat: mountain slope
Habit: small herb, about 50 – 60 cm high; flower about 8 – 10 mm across (not sure)


… and a few metres away …


Perhaps a Primula sp.


A wild guess: Primula macrophylla


Appears as Primula macrophylla only as per another thread

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Primula macrophylla (Primulaceae), Larged leaved Himalayan Primrose.: Primula macrophylla is an alpine primrose in the Himalaya.

Himalayan high altitudes are homeland of maximum number of Primula species in the world. One alpine valley in Pithoragarh district of Uttarakhand is known as Primula valley.

This primula depicted in the pics was one of the flower which compelled Frank Smythe to call Bhyundar Valley (earlier local nameof VoF) as Valley of Flower. Those who are going to VoFl in June may see it in full bloom.


I consider this has been correctly identified but apply a slightly different name drawing attention to the unpublished research of Professor Arve Elvebakk, University of Tromso, Norway (Curator of Tromso Arctic-Alpine Botanic Garden). The PRIMULA MACROPHYLLA (sensu lato – meaning in the broad sense) COMPLEX has troubled botanists and specialist growers for more than a century. 

Elvebakk has recognised a separate taxon/species Primula meeboldii (honouring the German botanist who first collected pressed specimens of this on high passes in Ladakh in the 19th Century).  It has pinkish flowers and occurs in Ladakh and some other regions.  Hopefully the full details will be published in the not-too-distant future. 

Anyhow, I am in support of the separation of P.meeboldii at species level, along with P.macrophylla sensu stricto (in the strict sense) and Primula moorcroftiana as separate species. 

The images taken in VOF fits with what I currently consider to be typical Primula macrophylla* (syn. Primula macrophylla var. macrophylla).  I have observed both P.macrophylla and P.moorcroftiana on the Rohtang.  P.moorcrotiana is mostly found from 4000-4500m (I have not been higher but it may well grow at higher altitudes) whereas P.macrophylla is mostly found between 3000-3600m. 

Please note that I have observed and photographed Primulas of this complex in the Kashmir Valley which do not fit either P.moorcroftiana, P.macrophylla or P.meeboldii – thus at least one more taxon is involved. I have found Primula macrophylla sensu stricto to vary a lot – so may well be subdivided at some point but the plant photographed in the VOF is not Primula moorcroftiana nor P.meeboldii nor matches the unknown(s) in Kashmir.


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Flora of Uttarakhand- Herb5 for Id- JM: Wild Herb seen on a rock face captured on 13/8/10 during the trek from Ghangaria (around 11,000 ft.) to Hemkunt Sahib (around 14000 ft.).


A mix of Pedicularis, Parnassia and possibly Primula (in fruit).


I have to basically tried to show one plant as in picture 2.


Primula in dried stage.

The yellow one, as per your other upload is Saxifraga and not Parnassia.

I think you went to the area about a month late. Alpine Himalayan are best to visit between 15 July to 15 August, when you can get good flowering specimens.


The second and third picture show fruiting of Primula macrophylla.


Much harder to decide when at fruiting stage as am still uncertain about any differences in calyx characteristics. Overall, this seems most likely to be ‘macropylla.
So I consider this has been correctly identified but apply a slightly different name drawing attention to the unpublished research of Professor Arve Elvebakk, University of Tromso, Norway (Curator of Tromso Arctic-Alpine Botanic Garden). The PRIMULA MACROPHYLLA (sensu lato – meaning in the broad sense) COMPLEX has troubled botanists and specialist growers for more than a century. 

Elvebakk has recognised a separate taxon/species Primula meeboldii (honouring the German botanist who first collected pressed specimens of this on high passes in Ladakh in the 19th Century).  It has pinkish flowers and occurs in Ladakh and some other regions.  Hopefully the full details will be published in the not-too-distant future. 

Anyhow, I am in support of the separation of P.meeboldii at species level, along with P.macrophylla sensu stricto (in the strict sense) and Primula moorcroftiana as separate species. 

The images taken fit with what I currently consider to be typical Primula macrophylla* (syn. Primula macrophylla var. macrophylla).  I have observed both P.macrophylla and P.moorcroftiana on the Rohtang.  P.moorcrotiana is mostly found from 4000-4500m (I have not been higher but it may well grow at higher altitudes) whereas P.macrophylla is mostly found between 3000-3600m. 

I have found Primula macrophylla sensu stricto to vary a lot – so may well be subdivided at some point but the plant photographed does not appear to match P.moorcroftiana nor P.meeboldii nor matches the unknown(s) in Kashmir..


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Plumbaginaceae and Primulaceae (Incl. Myrsinaceae) Fortnight- Primula for id from Hemkunt Sahib :: NS June 17 : 7 posts by 4 authors. Attachments (5).

This was again shot from the same locality as my recent post… can this be again Primula macrophylla ??


Primula macrophylla


 

The photographs you have displayed are of Himalayan Primula denticulata


Flowers many, in dense umbellate heads, calyx chartaceous- Primula denticulata.
Flowers 5-10 in number, in lax umbels, calyx not chartaceous- Primula macrophylla.
For me it is Primula macrophylla


Yes to me also it is P. macrophylla.


Thanks … for valuable information…
I must admit that insufficient pics are always a hindrance to reach to proper id, as here is the case..


Much harder to be sure when in fruiting stage.  I am still uncertain about distinguishing between ‘macrophylla’ and ‘moorcroftiana’ on the basis of calyx characteristics only. The foliage of what I consider to be ‘macrophylla’ varies considerably. These leaves come close to ‘moorcroftiana’ but I have seen foliage of ‘macrophylla’ amongst boulders at some 3000m on the Rohtang Pass which are close to these.
Overall I consider this has been correctly identified but apply a slightly different name drawing attention to the unpublished research of Professor Arve Elvebakk, University of Tromso, Norway (Curator of Tromso Arctic-Alpine Botanic Garden). The PRIMULA MACROPHYLLA (sensu lato – meaning in the broad sense) COMPLEX has troubled botanists and specialist growers for more than a century. 

Elvebakk has recognised a separate taxon/species Primula meeboldii (honouring the German botanist who first collected pressed specimens of this on high passes in Ladakh in the 19th Century).  It has pinkish flowers and occurs in Ladakh and some other regions.  Hopefully the full details will be published in the not-too-distant future. 

Anyhow, I am in support of the separation of P.meeboldii at species level, along with P.macrophylla sensu stricto (in the strict sense) and Primula moorcroftiana as separate species. 

The images taken fit with what I currently consider to be typical Primula macrophylla* (syn. Primula macrophylla var. macrophylla).  I have observed both P.macrophylla and P.moorcroftiana on the Rohtang.  P.moorcrotiana is mostly found from 4000-4500m (I have not been higher but it may well grow at higher altitudes) whereas P.macrophylla is mostly found between 3000-3600m. 

I have found Primula macrophylla sensu stricto to vary a lot – so may well be subdivided at some point but the plant photographed does not appear to match P.moorcroftiana nor P.meeboldii nor matches the unknown(s) in Kashmir..


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Primula macrophylla from Himachal [Sach Pass, Chamba; 3800 m asl]


One of the most beautiful Primula in alpines of Himalaya. Frank Smythe was amazed by its beauty when he saw it in Bhyundar Valley while returning from Mt Kamet expedition. This species and few others were so abundant there that he named the valley as Valley of Flowers.


Really beautiful flowers. Nicely captured through the lens too.
Primula macrophylla

A robust plant. Leaves: Narrow lanceolate or strap shaped erect, entire or toothed 10-30cm usually with white farina(Powder like) beneath. Flowers 5-25 purple Lilac usually with a darker eye. Petals elliptic to ovate entire.


I consider this has been correctly identified but apply a slightly different name drawing attention to the unpublished research of Professor Arve Elvebakk, University of Tromso, Norway (Curator of Tromso Arctic-Alpine Botanic Garden). The PRIMULA MACROPHYLLA (sensu lato – meaning in the broad sense) COMPLEX has troubled botanists and specialist growers for more than a century. 

Elvebakk has recognised a separate taxon/species Primula meeboldii (honouring the German botanist who first collected pressed specimens of this on high passes in Ladakh in the 19th Century).  It has pinkish flowers and occurs in Ladakh and some other regions.  Hopefully the full details will be published in the not-too-distant future. 

Anyhow, I am in support of the separation of P.meeboldii at species level, along with P.macrophylla sensu stricto (in the strict sense) and Primula moorcroftiana as separate species. 

The images taken fit with what I currently consider to be typical Primula macrophylla* (syn. Primula macrophylla var. macrophylla).  I have observed both P.macrophylla and P.moorcroftiana on the Rohtang.  P.moorcrotiana is mostly found from 4000-4500m (I have not been higher but it may well grow at higher altitudes) whereas P.macrophylla is mostly found between 3000-3600m. 

Please note that I have observed and photographed Primulas of this complex in the Kashmir Valley which do not fit either P.moorcroftiana, P.macrophylla or P.meeboldii – thus at least one more taxon is involved.

Also note that the first Primula which Smythe and the other mountaineers spotted at some 4800m as they descended into the Bhyundar Valley was the smaller Primula moorcroftiana (Primula macrophylla var. moorcroftiana) not Primula macrophylla var. macrophylla which the specimens from Sach Pass appear to be.


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Primula macrophylla D. Don shot in Sunderdhunga Valley of Uttarakhand.


The underside of the leaves of P.macrophylla is dusty white tomentose and if it is pressed against palm or any other object the clear cut image is printed. Of course the inflorescence quite resembles.


Dark eyed beauty.


I consider this has been correctly identified but apply a slightly different name drawing attention to the unpublished research of Professor Arve Elvebakk, University of Tromso, Norway (Curator of Tromso Arctic-Alpine Botanic Garden). The PRIMULA MACROPHYLLA (sensu lato – meaning in the broad sense) COMPLEX has troubled botanists and specialist growers for more than a century. 

Elvebakk has recognised a separate taxon/species Primula meeboldii (honouring the German botanist who first collected pressed specimens of this on high passes in Ladakh in the 19th Century).  It has pinkish flowers and occurs in Ladakh and some other regions.  Hopefully the full details will be published in the not-too-distant future. 

Anyhow, I am in support of the separation of P.meeboldii at species level, along with P.macrophylla sensu stricto (in the strict sense) and Primula moorcroftiana as separate species. 

The images taken fit with what I currently consider to be typical Primula macrophylla* (syn. Primula macrophylla var. macrophylla).  I have observed both P.macrophylla and P.moorcroftiana on the Rohtang.  P.moorcrotiana is mostly found from 4000-4500m (I have not been higher but it may well grow at higher altitudes) whereas P.macrophylla is mostly found between 3000-3600m. 

Please note that I have observed and photographed Primulas of this complex in the Kashmir Valley which do not fit either P.moorcroftiana, P.macrophylla or P.meeboldii – thus at least one more taxon is involved.


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I shot this Primula at Sach Pass (Chamba district, in Himachal; about 3800 m asl). Have not been able to fix its identity with the literature available with me. Previously I had kept it as P. macrophylla. However, during uploads for this fortnight, I find it different from the ones I have posted as P. macrophylla. Kindly help in its identification..


To me both (this and earlier posted) are P. macrophylla. Variability of the species can be observed in primula world: http://www.primulaworld.com/PWweb/photogallery.htm


Yes this is also Primula macrophylla. This is very variable species.


Thanks …,  this identifies mine post from VOF…


Thanks … for confirming identification…


Beautiful upload. The variation can be observed.


I consider this has been correctly identified but apply a slightly different name drawing attention to the unpublished research of Professor Arve Elvebakk, University of Tromso, Norway (Curator of Tromso Arctic-Alpine Botanic Garden). The PRIMULA MACROPHYLLA (sensu lato – meaning in the broad sense) COMPLEX has troubled botanists and specialist growers for more than a century. 

Elvebakk has recognised a separate taxon/species Primula meeboldii (honouring the German botanist who first collected pressed specimens of this on high passes in Ladakh in the 19th Century).  It has pinkish flowers and occurs in Ladakh and some other regions.  Hopefully the full details will be published in the not-too-distant future. 

Anyhow, I am in support of the separation of P.meeboldii at species level, along with P.macrophylla sensu stricto (in the strict sense) and Primula moorcroftiana as separate species. 

The images taken fit with what I currently consider to be typical Primula macrophylla* (syn. Primula macrophylla var. macrophylla).  I have observed both P.macrophylla and P.moorcroftiana on the Rohtang.  P.moorcrotiana is mostly found from 4000-4500m (I have not been higher but it may well grow at higher altitudes) whereas P.macrophylla is mostly found between 3000-3600m. 

However, I have found Primula macrophylla sensu stricto to vary a lot – so may well be subdivided at some point (note the silvery meal around the edge of the underside of the leaves) but the plant photographed is not Primula moorcroftiana nor P.meeboldii nor matches the unknown(s) in Kashmir.
Important to photograph both the upper and lower surface of Primula leaves – as well as close-ups of the calyces and corollas.

 


 

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Primula macrophylla D.Don, Prodr. Fl. Nepal. 80. 1825.
Family: PRIMULACEAE

Current pic taken just below the main Gurudwara of Hem Kunt Sahib.


 

Gorgeous, I love Primulas after Orchids 🙂


Beautiful and robust Primula of alpines.


This Primula with a huge bunch of beautiful violet flowers was shot from near Valley of Flowers..

Please help to id…


This could be Primula duthieana Balf. f. & W.W. Smith or Primula macrophylla var. macrophylla.
This species is closely related to Primula macrophylla.  Need more characters for conformation. This species is very common in Valley of Flower in between 3500-4300 m along rivulets and open places.


Link of species with pictures from Primula World – A Visual Reference for the Genus Primula are as below:

P. macrophylla


Primula macrophylla var. macrophylla in my view


Thanks … too for id confirmation..

I take this as Primula macrophylla var. macrophylla ..


A reply from , Creator of Primula World – A Visual Reference for the Genus Primula :

This is P. macrophylla var. macrophylla. P. duthieana is yellow.


I consider this has been correctly identified but apply a slightly different name drawing attention to the unpublished research of Professor Arve Elvebakk, University of Tromso, Norway (Curator of Tromso Arctic-Alpine Botanic Garden). The PRIMULA MACROPHYLLA (sensu lato – meaning in the broad sense) COMPLEX has troubled botanists and specialist growers for more than a century. 

Elvebakk has recognised a separate taxon/species Primula meeboldii (honouring the German botanist who first collected pressed specimens of this on high passes in Ladakh in the 19th Century).  It has pinkish flowers and occurs in Ladakh and some other regions.  Hopefully the full details will be published in the not-too-distant future. 

Anyhow, I am in support of the separation of P.meeboldii at species level, along with P.macrophylla sensu stricto (in the strict sense) and Primula moorcroftiana as separate species. 

The images taken fit with what I currently consider to be typical Primula macrophylla* (syn. Primula macrophylla var. macrophylla).  I have observed both P.macrophylla and P.moorcroftiana on the Rohtang.  P.moorcrotiana is mostly found from 4000-4500m (I have not been higher but it may well grow at higher altitudes) whereas P.macrophylla is mostly found between 3000-3600m. 

I have found Primula macrophylla sensu stricto to vary a lot – so may well be subdivided at some point but the plant photographed in the VOF is not Primula moorcroftiana nor P.meeboldii nor matches the unknown(s) in Kashmir.

 


Habitat: mountain slope
Habit: small herb, about 50 – 60 cm high; flower about 8 – 10 mm across (not sure)


… and a few metres away …


Perhaps a Primula sp.


A wild guess: Primula macrophylla


My Similar pictures can be seen in another thread

I consider this has been correctly identified but apply a slightly different name drawing attention to the unpublished research of Professor Arve Elvebakk, University of Tromso, Norway (Curator of Tromso Arctic-Alpine Botanic Garden). The PRIMULA MACROPHYLLA (sensu lato – meaning in the broad sense) COMPLEX has troubled botanists and specialist growers for more than a century. 

Elvebakk has recognised a separate taxon/species Primula meeboldii (honouring the German botanist who first collected pressed specimens of this on high passes in Ladakh in the 19th Century).  It has pinkish flowers and occurs in Ladakh and some other regions.  Hopefully the full details will be published in the not-too-distant future. 

Anyhow, I am in support of the separation of P.meeboldii at species level, along with P.macrophylla sensu stricto (in the strict sense) and Primula moorcroftiana as separate species. 

The images taken fit with what I currently consider to be typical Primula macrophylla* (syn. Primula macrophylla var. macrophylla).  I have observed both P.macrophylla and P.moorcroftiana on the Rohtang.  P.moorcrotiana is mostly found from 4000-4500m (I have not been higher but it may well grow at higher altitudes) whereas P.macrophylla is mostly found between 3000-3600m. 

I have found Primula macrophylla sensu stricto to vary a lot – so may well be subdivided at some point but the plant photographed in the VOF is not Primula moorcroftiana nor P.meeboldii nor matches the unknown(s) in Kashmir.


Thank you very much … for validating the ID, and for related information


The narrow foliage of the plant you photographed does not match the more typical leaves of Primula macrophylla (as I am calling it) [
Primula macrophylla var. macrophylla] but I have observed similar on specimens found at some 3000m on the Rohtang Pass
in HP.
Clearly, all taxa within the PRIMULA MACROPHYLLA COMPLEX vary a good deal and in time may be subdivided/separated further.
At times one just has to say, “that is the best/most I can say at present”.
The more close-ups we get of these Primulas the better we can understand them. Please be sure to take close-ups of the leaves next
time including undersides.  This would help.

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Primula macrophylla :: VOF, Uttarakhand :: Aug 2018 :: ARKOCT-30 : 5 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (2)

Saw this near Hemkund, Uttarakhand in Aug 2018, do not have any further pics.
Tentatively identified as Primula macrophylla based on similar pics by Dinesh ji, Balkar ji near or at the same location.
Requested to please validate, if possible.

FOP illustration ??


Yes, appears close as per images at


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VoF: BS 24082012 -2 Primula sp for id from the way to Hemkund Sahib:

Primula sp for id from the way to Hemkund Sahib.

This wild herb was shot on 15-8-12 from the way to Hemkund Sahib


This is a bit different. This is Primula macrophylla var. moorcroftiana.


This is not typical Primula macrophylla var. moorcroftiana. I shall comment further shortly once I have assigned names to all the postings of the Primula macrophylla complex – shall explain further.


It appears more closer to Primula macrophylla rather than Primula macrophylla var. moocroftiana as per images and details herein.



https://groups.google.com/group/indiantreepix/attach/a04e991e396a5/Primula%20nivalis%20(1).JPG?part=0.1&authuser=0&view=1

request for addition of Primula nivalis. : 5 posts by 1 author. 3 images- 2,4 & 6 mb each.

images of Primula nivalis pall.

captured at Kailash-Kund Bhaderwah JK

altitude- approximately 4200m.


What is worrying me is that POWO, Catalogue of Life and Flora of China, are not giving any distribution of this species (Primula nivalis Pall.) in India.
However images look quite close from the images at

http://botanicalillustrations.org/species.php?id_species=838233&mobile=0

Do you have any reference of it being found in India ?


Reply from … in another thread:

Primula nivalis differs from P. macrophylla (which was previously placed under P. nivalis as a variety) in leaves with denticulate margin, and shorter leaves as against entire margin and longer leaves in Primula macrophylla. I don’t think after separation of P. macrophylla and P. moorcroftiana, P. nivalis would be found in India.

… is quite correct. This is a rather broad-leaved form of P. macrophylla. P. nivalis has annulate flowers (constricted at the mouth) and acute corolla lobes. It is not found in India.



References:

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