A large deciduous shrub with ribbed densely hairy branches with straight or hooked up to 4 mm long prickles; leaf bippinate with up to 25 cm long rachis; pinnae 5-12 pairs, leaflets (pinnules) 6-15 pairs, 3-8 mm long; flowers pink fading to white in 12-15 mm across heads on up to 6 cm long peduncle, forming panicle; pod up to 10 cm long, 4-10 jointed, glabrous, with few prickles on sutures.
 
May be confused but easily differentiated from M. hamata, latter has shorter rachis (up to 5 cm long), few pairs of pinnae (3-6 pairs), fewer leaflets (6-10 pairs), smaller in size (2-3 mm long) in; shorter peduncle (2-3.5 cm) and shorter falcate pod (6-7 cm), velvety and densely prickly on sutures.  

  

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Flora of Panipat: Mimosa himalayana from Canal Bank Village Lohari Panipat Mimosa himalayana from Canal Bank Village Lohari Panipat
Small wild tree with beautiful flowers


 

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Mimosa himalayana from near Nagrota J & K: Mimosa himalayana Gamble in Kew Bull. 1920: 4. 1920.

syn: Mimosa rubricaulis sensu auct.; Mimosa rubricaulis subsp. himalayana (Gamble) H.Ohashi
A large deciduous shrub with ribbed densely hairy branches with straight or hooked up to 4 mm long prickles; leaf bippinate with up to 25 cm long rachis; pinnae 5-12 pairs, leaflets (pinnules) 6-15 pairs, 3-8 mm long; flowers pink fading to white in 12-15 mm across heads on up to 6 cm long peduncle, forming panicle; pod up to 10 cm long, 4-10 jointed, glabrous, with few prickles on sutures.
May be confused but easily differentiated from M. hamata, latter has shorter rachis (up to 5 cm long), few pairs of pinnae (3-6 pairs), fewer leaflets (6-10 pairs), smaller in size (2-3 mm long) in; shorter peduncle (2-3.5 cm) and shorter falcate pod (6-7 cm), velvety and densely prickly on sutures.
Photographed from Near Nagrota (10 km from Jammu) in J & K in August


Any member having access to the following publication may help in knowing differences from typical M. rubicaulis

Bulletin of Miscellaneous Information (Royal Gardens, Kew) © 1920 Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
The Indian species of Mimosa by J S Gamble


I too have photographed these a little after leaving Jammu.
You could see a number of them along the National highway at a particular altitude.
Did not find them after climbing higher up to Patni Top.


Yes … Common in subtropical Himalayas


Common in Haryana also along bank of canals etc
attaching some pics


Google search gave me a small peep into Jastor Gamble original paper:

Gamble differentiated this species on the basis of 8-12 pairs of pinnae, each pinna with 16-20 pairs of leaflets most commonly 19, and pod acuminate in most cases.


Kindly find attached The Indian species of Mimosa by J S Gamble.


images by Dr. Balkar Singh

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M. rubicaulis from IOCL Panipat Canal: Mimosa rubicaulis
small tree found along canal banks, photo 24-10-2006


Yes … We had it once in our Botanical Garden, but no longer.


Thsi also found in Bengal i too have seen it.


In Pune (Mah) I have seen Mimosa hamata which is similar to this plant.
The difference I could note here in your picture…………The branches are grooved.
The pods are supposed to be glabrous in M.rubicaulis whereas they are pubescent in
M. hamata
. I will try to check the pods of M. hamata. This plant is new to me. Thanks for showing.


I could locate the following differences between the two species

M. rubicaulis                                            M. hamata
Pinnae usually more than 5 pairs              Pinnae usually not more than 5 pairs  
Midrib lateral                                            Midrib near middle of leaflet
Flowers rose coloured fading white           Flowers red
Pod sutures glabrous                                Pod sutures armed with hooked prickles


More Pics from Village Khukhrana Panipat, Shot yesterday


According to the key and information from Gamble’s paper this is M. himalayana.
Mimosa rubicaulis does not grow in North India


I have also collected the same species from Mahendragiri hills and Ranpur in high altitudes.


 

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Fabaceae-Mimosoideae (Mimosaceae) Week: Mimosa himalayana from Panipat: Mimosa himalayana Gamble
This one is very beautiful Mimosa, in our area confined to banks of large water channels only, grows occasionally in lower hilly tracts of Haryana Siwaliks, this one was shot from Delhi-parallel canal, Panipat.


 

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Mimosa himalayana Gamble in Kew Bull. 1920: 4. 1920.
syn: Mimosa rubricaulis sensu auct.; Mimosa rubricaulis subsp. himalayana (Gamble) H.Ohashi
A large deciduous shrub with ribbed densely hairy branches with straight or hooked up to 4 mm long prickles; leaf bippinate with up to 25 cm long rachis; pinnae 5-12 pairs, leaflets (pinnules) 6-15 pairs, 3-8 mm long; flowers pink fading to white in 12-15 mm across heads on up to 6 cm long peduncle, forming panicle; pod up to 10 cm long, 4-10 jointed, glabrous, with few prickles on sutures.
May be confused but easily differentiated from M. hamata, latter has shorter rachis (up to 5 cm long), few pairs of pinnae (3-6 pairs), fewer leaflets (6-10 pairs), smaller in size (2-3 mm long) in; shorter peduncle (2-3.5 cm) and shorter falcate pod (6-7 cm), velvety and densely prickly on sutures.
Photographed from Near Nagrota (10 km from Jammu) in J & K in August


 
[efloraofindia:0] M. rubicaulis from IOCL Panipat Canal : Attachments (2 + 10). 11 posts by 5 authors.

Mimosa rubicaulis
small tree found along canal banks, photo 24-10-2006


Yes … We had it once in our Botanical Garden, but no longer.


This also found in Bengal i too have seen it.


In Pune (Mah) I have seen Mimosa hamata which is similar to this plant.
The difference I could note here in your picture…………The branches are grooved.
The pods are supposed to be glabrous in M.rubicaulis whereas they are pubescent in M. hamata.

I will try to check the pods of M. hamata. This plant is new to me.


I could locate the following differences between the two species
M. rubicaulis                                            M. hamata
Pinnae usually more than 5 pairs             Pinnae usually not more than 5 pairs
Midrib lateral                                           Midrib near middle of leaflet
Flowers rose coloured fading white          Flowers red
Pod sutures glabrous                               Pod sutures armed with hooked prickles


More Pics from Village Khukhrana Panipat, Shot yesterday (17.8.11)


According to the key and information from Gamble’s paper this is M. himalayana.
Mimosa rubicaulis does not grow in North India


Thanks for Correction Sir. I will change my labels accordingly

Superb catch … Thanks for sharing. I have also collected the same species from Mahendragiri hills and Ranpur in high altitudes.


 

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Mimosa himalayana Gamble (accepted name) :: : 5 posts by 4 authors. Attachments (6)
Sharing some pictures I guess is Mimosa himalayana Gamble (accepted name) shot at Kurintar, Nepal on 9 August 2014 at 1000 ft.
Nepali Names: अररि Arari / अरेली Areli   / बोक्सी घाँस Boksi Ghaas / तिरिन्खे Tirinkhe


Yes …, It is M. himalayana. Excellent photographs.


  

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Mimosa diplotricha from Hooghly: 11 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (8)

I asked myself –
  1. “Is it Mimosa pudica?”
  2. “Is it sensitive?”
  3. “Is this an illusion?”
When i saw this plant i was sure that it was Mimosa pudica. But when i touched it, it didn’t response! I touched again, this time harder, but it didn’t response. I hit it with my plastic scale on its highly prickled stem and it appeared to me that it did response! Or was it an illusion, i asked myself.
As i was going through my old records of Mimosa pudica i realized that it was not the same plant. Net search gave me Mimosa himalayana. I was about to id this plant with the same. But searched further and found Mimosa diplotricha at FoC – http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=242332757.
I think this is Mimosa diplotricha var. diplotricha as in FoC – http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=250019707.
Species : Mimosa diplotricha var. diplotricha
Habit & Habitat : shrub, about 6.5 feet, beside railway track
Date : 01-Sept.-2012, 4.30 P.M.
Place : Baruipara (Hooghly)
ID help :

It would have to much easier for us if you had given the characters on the basis of which you rejected M. himalayana and chose M. diplotricha.
On the basis of preliminary comparison your plant does not appear M. diplotricha, in which there are generally more than 20 pairs of leaflets and latter are densely silky.
One important thing to note is that your first plant is much different from your other photographs, in both number of pinnae, number of leaflets and flower colour. I fear they may be two different species. The first has nearly 10 pairs of pinnae and 11-12 pairs of leaflets. with much longer leaves. The other seems to have 5-7 pairs of pinnae and 10-12 pairs of leaflets.
Both M. rubicaulis and M. himalayana (often treated under one species) are recognised as distinct species by the Plant List and Monograph on Indian Mimosa by Gamble. Former has usually 4-6 pairs of pinnae and 10-15 pairs of leaflets. Latter has 8-12 pairs of pinnae and 16-20 pairs of leaflets. Your plant (except first) seem to be fitting M. rubicailis.
I am attaching the paper for your reference.


Thank you very much for elaborating on Mimosa sp.
I am not sure if the attached pictures were of the same plant.
There were a small community at that place, spreading along railway tracks and 100 meters away from the railway tracks, inside a private unused land, inaccessible to me. 
I took more than 50 pictures from 3 plants lined in a series, having a space of about 20 to 30 feet between each other, along the rail tracks. Of these 3 plants, the first two were beyond my reach and i could take only distant shots with my 5x (200mm) zoom. I could access a branch of the 3rd plant and took closer photographs.
I regret that i didn’t record any leaf, leaflet, petiole, peduncle measurements and could not find any fruit.
It was a cloudy day with high wind and the sun played hide & seek. Colour variation in attached photographs resulted from variable intensity of sunlight and controlled aperture setting by myself.
The description of Mimosa diplotricha available in the sites i cited in my post is confusing. An example : 11 to 30 pairs of leaflets on each of 3 to 10 pairs of pinnae. However, one site states leaflets sessile, opposite, lanceolate, acute – http://www.hear.org/pier/species/mimosa_diplotricha.htm, whereas leaflets in my post, i think, not acute.
I very much wanted to ID this plant as M. himalayana, but nowhere i could found that M. himalayana is moderately sensitive, even in any thread in the group posts i browsed :-
Attaching larger pictures of the same plant or plants.
If Mimosa himalayana is a sensitive plant then my species is Mimosa himalayana.


Our first work in CAL next is checking mimosa in Herabriumnext Gdn office in top floor and in hall two where type section etc is kept. this is another example for independent KYDIANA FOR SUCH items on geogrphical elementS of taxonomy., Unless I see the whole world in Herabrium I dont publish any speciEs as species is not based on just one specimen SO I DID NOT PUBLISH ANY SPECIES AT ALL -when a plant by railwaytrack can be from source of Sunflower or tobcco plantation in Mexico which we are growing here.. Just inone day a seed can be taken to Sandieg o! at extreme west from Hoogly in East . Good observations using all senses
Di d yougointo details of M,himalayn and M.diplotricha an note on paper with pen.

KeepPollunin and stainton with youas Williams behind it is simple and ecellent botanist at BM I met. I hve to prepare a paperon Kydia Roxb inindia and also on Populus Linnwhich I worke inBM whenWilliams wa alive. William Stern Librarianand authority onSolanacae and Lililiacea .


I am sorry that data deficiency may plague this species to identify it to species level.


I have visited and recorded fresh pictures of this plant today, at Baruipara (Hooghly). I am attaching those images in two mails, for their bigger sizes, so as to study various features of this species.
I repeat that this plant is sensitive as can be seen in the first two pictures, taken within a gap of less than 1 minute.

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june15sk28/33 — Mimosa sp. : 1 post by 1 author. Attachments (13)

None of the Fl. Br. Ind. / Fl. Ind. / Bengal Plants / Botany of Bihar and Orissa / Gamble / FoC / FoP can explain this somewhat straggling shrub, collected beside rail tracks.
Features are –
  1. height as tall as myself or little taller (possibly often pruned by villagers there who makes path for their livestock forage)
  2. it is semi-sensitive
  3. leaf rachis upto 15 cm
  4. pinnae 7 to 10 pairs
  5. leaflets per pinna 8 to 12 (13) pairs
  6. leaflet size 11 x 4 mm
  7. fruit 7 x 1.2 cm
I have uploaded around 36 pictures, recorded from time to time – https://groups.google.com/d/msg/indiantreepix/k7gNc6OBuz0/gRs7yXXhYMcJ. I reject my earlier id.
Attached here herb. pics and a few photographs, and entries from lit.
And with this I end this herbarium series.

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Mimosa rubicaulis Lam. ??? : 5 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (4)

Location: Peace Pagoda, Pokhara, Nepal 

Date : 11 August 2017
Altitude : 3700 ft.


I think should be Mimosa himalayana Gamble as per keys & images herein.


Thank you … Syn: Mimosa rubricaulis subsp. himalayana (Gamble) H.Ohashi 

Nepali Names : अरारी Araaree / अरेली काँडा Arelee Kaandaa / बोक्सी घाँस Boksi Ghaans  / तिरिन्खे Tirinkhe 

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SK955 21JAN-2018 : 6 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (6)

Location: Balaju, Mudkhu, Nepal
Altitude: 4800 ft.

Date: 16 July 2017

Mimosa rubicaulis Lam. 


I think more closer to Mimosa himalayana Gamble as per keys at Mimosa 


 

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please identify the plant : 5 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (2)
Can you please identify this beautiful plant ?

Photo taken : Sept -18
Location Himachal pradesh :  UNA India 
Height from sea level 700 mtr.
Habitat : wild.


Please check Mimosa sp.

Pl. check comparative images at 

Also check the keys at the given link. 

Thank you all for your help! I think this is Mimosa himalayana.

 

 

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Satpura Tiger Reseve on 20-9-09; IOCL Panipat Canal- 24-10-2006;   Mimosa himalayana – NSD 10 – indiantreepix | Google Groups

Mimosa rubicaulis Lam. : 4 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (4) – 626 kb. 1, 1 & 3 mb.

Location:  Ranimahal, Palpa
Date: 25 September 2019
Elevation:648 m.
Habit : Wild


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