The leaves of Erythrina stricta are glabrous and those of Erythrina suberosa are not. Likewise the pods.
Erythrina suberosa called as Pangari or Booch pangara. Small tree.
Bark light grey. corky, cracked, vertical fissures or grooves deep. Branches crooked.
Flowers early Feb March; common around Pune.

Erythrina stricta. Also called Pangari. Large tree. Bark smooth (Not grooved) Branches prickly far more than the above. Flowering season comparatively late- May Observed more in large jungles in Mulshi and others in Konkan not near the city of Pune

As per efi thread:
Of course the Key in BSI is very good and depends on calyx spathaceous, not 2 lipped, splitting down deep to base in E.variegata and E.stricta whereas not so in E suberosa where it is not spathaceous and it is more or less 2 lipped.
 
As per efi thread:

Calyx not 2 lipped, splitting down to the base, entire at apex is E. stricta

Calyx 2 lipped, not splitting down is E. suberosa, though the bark and spines may differ.
Erythrina stricta and E. suberosa has the keel petal white/ creamy where as E. indica and E. varigata has red colored keel. 


Erythrina stricta Roxb. : 6 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (10)

Posting images of Erythrina stricta Roxb. from the northern Western Ghats. These pictures are from two individuals growing quite close to one another and were taken at different times. This species is by far the most common wild Erythrina in the forests around Mumbai.  I have noticed some variation within the species especially in the appearance of the bark. Older trees have much more of a corky look with fewer prickles.
E. suberosa is seen more rarely and always in drier, exposed slopes.
The leaves of Erythrina stricta are glabrous and those of Erythrina suberosa are not. Likewise the pods.
Both trees bloom when leafless and at this time it is easy to confuse the two, especially as fallen leaves are often burnt in forest fires. It is almost impossible to distinguish the two species with long shots of the flowers alone. Good descriptions of both can be found in Pradip Krishen’s Jungle Trees of Central India.


Thanks a lot, … But posts in efi site tell an altogether different story.
As per the following, your plant also appear to be Erythrina suberosa to me with calyx being two lipped & bark being not grooved.
Pl. see the detailed differences as per the following threads:

As per efi thread:

Calyx not 2 lipped, splitting down to the base, entire at apex is E. stricta

Calyx 2 lipped. not splitting down is E. suberosa, though the bark and spines may differ. 
Erythrina suberosa called as Pangari or Booch pangara. Small tree.
Bark light grey. corky, cracked, vertical fissures or grooves deep. Branches crooked.
Flowers early Feb March; common around Pune.

Erythrina stricta. Also called Pangari. Large tree. Bark smooth (Not grooved) Branches prickly far more than the above. Flowering season comparatively late- May Observed more in large jungles in Mulshi and others in Konkan not near the city of Pune

As per efi thread:
Of course the Key in BSI is very good and depends on calyx spathaceous, not 2 lipped, splitting down deep to base in E.variegata and E.stricta whereas not so in E suberosa where it is not spathaceous and it is more or less 2 lipped.
I request other members from the area to chip in to sort out this confusion.


Sorry, …,
Your plant may be Erythrina stricta as per

Erythrina suberosa called as Pangari or Booch pangara. Small tree.
Bark light grey. corky, cracked, vertical fissures or grooves deep. Branches crooked.
Flowers early Feb March; common around Pune.

Erythrina stricta. Also called Pangari. Large tree. Bark smooth (Not grooved) Branches prickly far more than the above. Flowering season comparatively late- May Observed more in large jungles in Mulshi and others in Konkan not near the city of Pune
I am confused regarding the calyx in your images- in 4th images it appears to be two lipped, but may not be so in other images.


I have studied all these posts and researched the subject for a number of years.

I doubt that all the efI posts are correct. Some of them show a mixture of 2 species and the identity can only be guessed at with long shots of flowers only. There is a huge confusion on the net as well as many erroneous images.
As I mentioned there is considerable diversity within each species and you can’t go on only the calyx character, you have to see the whole tree including leaves, bark, pods and seeds. You also have to consider the age of the tree. Flowering time varies according to soil and micro environment. In order to be sure an easy check you can do is look at the leaves and pods which are the most consistent.


Thanks, …, for experienced views.


This is Erythrina stricta Roxb.


Could you pl. point out posts where you feel that they are of Erythrina stricta under Erythrina suberosa page so that those can be corrected ?


Images by Dinesh Valke (Inserted by J.M.Garg)

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Fabaceae-Faboideae (Papilionaceae) Week :: Erythrina suberosa in northern Western Ghats: Erythrina suberosa Roxb.

er-ith-RY-nuh — red colored
sub-er-OH-suh — cork bark
Apr 7, 2007 … along NH4 near Lonavala, Maharashtra
some views: Apr 7, 2007 … along NH4 near Lonavala, Maharashtra
Apr 7, 2008 … near Lion’s Point, Lonavala, Maharashtra
Feb 15, 2009 … at Yeoor Hills (part of Sanjay Gandhi National Park)
Apr 14, 2010 … along NH8 near Chinchoti, Maharashtra


Good photos, but…
I guess this species is E. stricta, i may be wrong but please check once again..


Indeed … It is Erythrina stricta var. suberosa (Roxb.) Niyomdham … this photo of the plant is featured at UBC Botanical Garden and Centre for Plant Research.
There it says: … It is far more common that this coral tree is presented with the scientific name Erythrina suberosa online, but its taxonomic status was changed in 1992 to being recognized as only a variety of Erythrina stricta. It is native to southeast and south Asia.
At present, the status is different (referencing The Plants List).
Here, we see Erythrina stricta var. suberosa (Roxb.) Niyomdham put as synonym of Erythrina suberosa Roxb.
It is pure matter of study, if the status is otherwise.
But if this plant has to be Erythrina stricta Roxb. you must be seeing some strong feature which differentiates it from Erythrina suberosa Roxb.


Leaving aside the nomenclature status, I think the two trees are distinct
E. stricta seems to be less prickly, prickly usually whitish, with leaves glabrous on both sides, several racemes at ends of stout branches, flowers scarlet in colour, calyx spathelike split up to base and pod 2-3 seeded.
E. suberosa on the other hand is densely prickly with yellowish or brownish prickles, leaves beneath and branches densely hairy, flowers with tinge of orange, calyx turbinate, bilabiate but not split up to base, fruit 4-5 seeded.
I think … plant is E. suberosa whatever may be its nomenclatural status.


i want to say E.stricta var. stricta and not suberosa,
what i know is E. suberosa is hardly with spines, bark always look rupture..


Please have a look at E. stricta uploaded by … today, and also the links I sent you today in this thread.


sorry, above comment i wrote without reading your link sirji, but even after reading, it do not satisfy the conclusion, and in the second link, i do not think they have provided with proper correct photo (i may be wrong), but i guess, E. suberosa less prickly than E. stricta, infact E. suberosa on stem hardly show spines, bark is thick, rupture and look like crocodile bark, very light to handle or may be, because of this character it has been used as cork in older days, even the leaflets are thick, tomentose,

E. suberosa very commonly seen in Pune, in Maharashtra.. its quite distinct from E. stricta and E. variegata the species found in Wild.
i think photo here is E. stricta


I just went through my photographs of E. suberosa from Delhi, and yes the stems and branches are not that prickly. I will upload all my collections of Erythrina in a day or two. Kindly give your opinion on them.


I agree to some extent with …

What I feel
Erythrina suberosa called as Pangari or Booch pangara. Small tree.
Bark light grey. corky, cracked, vertical fissures or grooves deep. Branches crooked.
Flowers early Feb March; common around Pune.
Erythrina stricta. Also called Pangari. Large tree. Bark smooth (Not grooved) Branches prickly far more than the above. Flowering season comparatively late- May Observed more in large jungles in Mulshi and others in Konkan not near the city of Pune 
Of course the Key in BSI is very good and depends on calyx spathaceous, not 2 lipped, splitting down deep to base in E.variegata and E.stricta whereas not so in E suberosa where it is not spathaceous and it is more or less 2 lipped.
Shrikant ji’s book also gives clear differentiating characters.
Hope this doesn’t add to the confusion.

Reading through comments, my plant seems to be Erythrina stricta just as … suggested.
Apologies for mistaking ID in the first place.
Will wait for few more days to take into account any other validating comments, before I correct my flickr notes.


My pictures of E Stricta?


Erythrina suberosa Roxb. as per images herein & as per another thread.


To me this one is Erythrina stricta as previously concluded in the thread.


Thanks … very very much … will correct it in flickr.


 

Erythrina stricta : 8 posts by 6 authors. Attachments (8)

As requested – photographs of E.stricta taken yesterday at my farm. It has not flowered yet.


Thanks for showing this…
There is a distinct difference in the pattern of thorns on the bark.


I’m not familiar with this species. Is this an Indian native? Tropical or subtropical in origin?


Nice to see you out here after a long time.. As far as I know Erythrina stricta is native to Southeast Asia.


Am afraid can’t answer your question with certainty. Possibly a native to dry mixed forests throughout India and also eastwards into SE Asia. However it is fairly prevalant in the state of Maharashtra. 


Very nice pictures. Reminds me of our farm when I was a kid. We had hundreds of them as standards for black pepper. Maintaining them was a problem as every year so many workers got injured during pruning or lopping. We replaced most of them with Jack and Gliricidia. We still have a few though.


 

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Bark of E.stricta :  2 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (1)

Many many thanks … please show a long shot of this tree, and a view of branch ending, whenever possible.


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Erythrina indica Lamk. syn. Erythrina variegata L. : 16 posts by 6 authors. Attachments (4)

The flowering and fruitng of Erythrina indica seen today (18.4.10) at the South end of the national park in Mumbai. One amusing thing I find is the touch of silk cotton blown from the abundance of  the silk cotton pods in this month on  almost all trees around it’s  vicinity. Here too it can be seennear the pods.


The inflorescence suggests E. suberosa


Agree with … Also in E.variegata the pods should be long, round, beaded with a constriction between the seeds.


Erythrina stricta var. suberosa is commonly known as: Indian coral tree, tiger claw • Bengali: রক্তমন্দার raktamandar • Hindi: ढोलधाक dhol-dhak, मन्दार mandara, पांगरा pangra • Kannada: halivana, keechige, mandara • Konkani: पांगार paangaar • Malayalam: ആണ്മുരിക്ക് aanmurikk, മുളളുമുരിക്ക് mulalumurikk, വെണ്മുരിക്ക് venamurikk • Marathi: पांगारा pangara • Sanskrit: मन्दार mandara, पारिभद्र paribhadra • Tamil: கிஞ்சுகம் kincukam, முண்முருக்கு munmurukku, முருக்கு மரம் murukku maram • Telugu: బలభద్రిక balabhadrika
It is far more common that this coral tree is presented with the scientific name Erythrina suberosa online, but its taxonomic status was changed in 1992 to being recognized as only a variety of Erythrina stricta. It is native to southeast and south Asia. … http://www.ubcbotanicalgarden.org/potd/2007/06/erythrina_suberosa.php
NPGS / GRIN … http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?317849


According to Dr.Almeida’s ‘Flora of Maharashtra’ – E.variegata [E.indica], E.suberosa and E.stricta are all distinct. Have all 3 on my property but only E.suberosa is flowering now. Sending you a few photographs of E.suberosa [and photographs of the barks of E.stricta and E.variegata in separate mails]. Attachments (4)


Pods in the attached images appear to be non- glabrous & should be of Erythrina suberosa Roxb. as per discussions in another thread


I agree with this one as well although all the posts have come into one email in my Inbox!  Referring to the one with corky bark.


Many thanks … for the clarification.
Surprising to see no spines on the branches carrying the flowers of E. suberosa.
Eager to see E. stricta flowering and know the difference … perhaps that would show spines.


Spines are seen at the top of really tall trees. Sending you a few photographs. Attachments (6)


These images by … may be as Erythrina stricta Roxb. due to glabrous pods although images are not clear.


OK, the one with the Rufous tree pie seems to be E. suberosa as … suggests. There are few spines on the branches.


Thanks, …
But to me pods in this set of six images appear to be glabrous, although images are not clear.


Yes indeed … my eagerness remains to see a view of E. stricta flowering … to know whether the two species are easily distinguishable.


E. stricta can be observed in Sanjay Gandhi National Park, very common near the old remain of NITCo Company (i dnt know exact name). where as E. suberosa can be observed at Veermata Jijabai Bhonsale udyan, just opposite lane to the main office. also one at Goregaon east station road, opposite Pritam hotel.


Taking it as Erythrina stricta Roxb. due to glabrous pods & bark not being grooved as per discussions in another thread.


Agree with you on this one. It is not E. indica.


 

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Erythrina stricta var. suberosa 
along NH No. 4 (AH47) near Lonavala on April 7, 2007 
at Purandar on March 11, 2009 
near Lion’s Point on April 7, 2008


Taking it as Erythrina stricta Roxb. due to glabrous pods & calyx not being two-lipped as per discussions in another thread.


Thanks very much … for updating this post with the corrected ID.


Yes it is E. stricta


 

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Erythrina for ID : 050611 : AK-3: This one taken at Kasara Ghat, on the Mumbai-Nasik highway on the 13th of March, 2011.


I guess Erythrina stricta


I too agree with E Stricta



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ID request please – SJ-2Mar11-1: is the red flower in the image a Coral? Would greatly appreciate your ID
confirmation.

It is a White-browed Scimitar-babbler on a species of Erythrina


the flowers is of Erythrina stricta L. 


Erythrina stricta but your capturing is very nice appreicible


Scimitar Babbler & striking red flowers of Erythrina. – Nice to see them together, great details & well captured.
This bird is very elusive & difficult to sight & photograph in the jungle.
Here are my record shots of this bird  in the dense vegetation of Yercaud forest, Tamil Nadu.


From the Plant List, the following are two different accepted names:
http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl/record/ild-31144 (Erythrina stricta Roxb.)
http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl/record/ild-31145 (Erythrina suberosa Roxb. syn: Erythrina stricta var. suberosa (Roxb.) Niyomdham)
Which is our plant found in India & posted on eFI as per details at
/species/a—l/f/fabaceae/…
I have to correct this page accordingly.


Erythrina stricta and E. suberosa has the keel petal white/ creamy where as E. indica and E. varigata has red colored keel. 


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Erithrina sp. flowering:  Here’s the first flowering of Erythrinia with a visitor seen at the south end of the forest in Mumbai – most likely Erythrinia variegata L. The bark has vertical lines and prickles on trunk and young branches– Request validation.


Yes …, every where it’s started blooming now. At Seoni we also enjoying the same scenario.


This is seen towards the edge of the forest. It is dry right now.


This is Erythrina stricta.
can be easily identified on the shape and size of the Keel petal. common in Sanjay Gandhi National Park, Mumbai


yes it the flowering has reduced in recent years due to a infection which is very common in Erythrina, the inflorescence get infected and  the flowering axis swells irregularly, hence the flowering gets reduced.

Erythrina stricta Roxb. & Erythrina suberosa Roxb.: From the Plant List, the following are two different accepted names: http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl/record/ild-31144 (Erythrina stricta Roxb.)
http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl/record/ild-31145 (Erythrina suberosa Roxb. syn: Erythrina stricta var. suberosa (Roxb.) Niyomdham<http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl/record/ild-46921> )
Which is our plant found in India & posted on eFI as per details at
/species/a—l/f/fabaceae/…

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Erythrina stricta Roxb. (accepted name) ??? : 7 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (5)

Location: Sourinee, Mirik, India
Date: 21 April 2017
Altitude: 5000 ft.

Or Erythrina suberosa Roxb. (accepted name)  ??


Superb images, … Pl. Check with comparative images at EFI. 


Looks so similar for me. 


To me it looks different from Erythrina suberosa Roxb. as per images & keys herein.
Can it be elusive Erythrina stricta, I think the only other option ?


It would be helpful to have images of the bark and if possible some leaves. This is most likely Erythrina stricta, in my experience not at all elusive!


Thanks, … May I request you to pl. post your images of Erythrina stricta.  


 

References: The Plant List 1  The Plant List 2  GRIN  Flora of China  Trees of Andhra Pradesh, India By Thamminen Pullaiah, S. Sandhya Rani (Description & Keys- variegata, fusca, stricta, suberosa & subumbrans)

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