Lepidium virginicum L., Sp. Pl. 645 1753. (syn: Clypeola caroliniana Walter; Conocardamum virginicum (L.) Webb; Dileptium virginicum (L.) Raf.; Iberis virginica (L.) Rchb.; Lepidium virginicum var. centrali-americanum (Thell.) C.L. Hitchc.; Lepidium virginicum subsp. centrali-americanum Thell.; Lepidium virginicum var. durangense C.L. Hitchc.; Lepidium virginicum var. tepicense C.L. Hitchc.; Nasturtium virginicum (L.) Gillet & Magne; Thlaspi virginianum Poir.; Thlaspi virginicum (L.) Cav.);      
Bhutan, China, India, Japan, Pakistan, Russia; native to North America; introduced elsewhere as per Flora of China;
 
Lepidium virginicum Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 2: 645. 1753.

Annual or biennial herb up to 60 cm tall, branched above; leaves oblanceolate or spathulate, pinnatifid or lyrate, upper serrate or subentire; pedicels glabrous; sepals 0.7-1 mm long, pilose outside; petals longer than sepals, 1-1.5 mm long, white, spathulate; stamens 2-4; fruit orbicular, 2.5-3.5 mm, narrowly winged at apex, glabrous, apical notch 0.2-0.5 mm; style 0.1-0.2 mm long.
The species is quite distint among small fruited species (less than 4 mm long) in its petals which are longer than sepals, slightly larger glabrous fruits, and narrow apical wings.  
Photographed from Kud, Jammu & Kashmir, growing along roadsides. Photographed in June.
I Feel that the plant uploaded by … at Flowers of India website may not be this species. It has much larger fruits (compare with flower size) and looks similar to my Lepidium sativum also depicted at the same website. 


Brasicaceae Week: Lepidium virginicum from Kud, Jammu & Kashmir: Lepidium virginicum Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 2: 645. 1753.
Annual or biennial herb up to 60 cm tall, branched above; leaves oblanceolate or spathulate, pinnatifid or lyrate, upper serrate or subentire; pedicels glabrous; sepals 0.7-1 mm long, pilose outside; petals longer than sepals, 1-1.5 mm long, white, spathulate; stamens 2-4; fruit orbicular, 2.5-3.5 mm, narrowly winged at apex, glabrous, apical notch 0.2-0.5 mm; style 0.1-0.2 mm long.
The species is quite distinct among small fruited species (less than 4 mm long) in its petals which are longer than sepals, slightly larger glabrous fruits, and narrow apical wings.
Photographed from Kud, Jammu & Kashmir, growing along roadsides. Photographed in June. 
 

 

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Herb for id 280411MK1:

Please help to id this small herb found in a tea estate of Kotagiri, Nilgiris. Is this Capsella sp. or any other Brassicaceae?

Date/Time-

09-04-2011 / 05:00 PM

Location- Place, Altitude, GP

ca.2000asl; Kotagiri, TN

Habitat- Garden/ Urban/ Wild/ Type-

weed in tea estate

Plant Habit-

herb

Height/Length-

15-20 cm long

Leaves Type/ Shape/ Size-

ca.5 x 0.5 cm

Inflorescence Type/ Size-

terminal raceme; c. 6 cm long

Flowers Size/ Colour/ Calyx/ Bracts-

0.2 – 0.3 cm across

Fruits Type/ Shape/ Size Seeds-

0.3cm long


Some species of Lepidium: Perhaps L. apetalum, although I can see some petals, otherwise L. pinnatifidum, if petals 2/3 as long as sepals and lower leaves pinnatifid. In both mature fruit should be 2-3 mm broad.

In species of Lepidium size of mature fruit (l x b), notch and its depth, presence and relative size of sepals and petals are important.


Kindly refer Dr.Gurucharan Singh’s recent posting of Lepidium sp. at efi thread


I think the plant is Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medikus belonging to Brassicaceae (earlier called Cruciferae). The plant is commonly called Shepherd’s purse, so-called because of the shape of the fruit, which resembles the purse used by European shepherds in ancient times. The plant occurs as a weed in cool temperate Himalayas and Nilgiri mountains of S. India. I am attaching some photos of the species taken from a website and along with one of your photos.


Capsella bursa-pastoris is a totally different plant with a very distinctive triangular notch, hence the name Shepherd’s purse. There are no attachments of Balakrishna ji here but I am sending mine for both Lepidium and Capsella. The two can simply not be confused.


Looking at the length of petals and winged upper part of fruit, it may well be Lepidium virginicum


… is correct. It is a Lepidium. There are three species of Lepidium reported from Tamil Nadu, L. ruderale L. (Roadside Pepper cress), L. sativum L. (Garden cress) and L. virginicum L. (Virginian Pepper cress). The other species are North Indian and Himalayan. The exact identification can be done only by examining fresh plants and floral parts. Please refer to Flora of India, vol 2, pp.199 – 209. 1993.


Appears closer to Lepidium virginicum L. as per images of …


 

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Wild Weed for ID : New Jersey : 08OCT19 : AK-06 : 9 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (2)
Weed seen growing wild by the roadside in June, 2017.

I seem to have seen it earlier but can’t recollect the name.


Penny Cress?


I think Field Penny-cress.


its raceme is highly branched, from the main stem as seen in your pictures. a weed found all over usa. its edible.
one of the plants we learn about when we learn living off of the wild ernes and urban foraging
Field penny cress is not edible, accumulates toxic metals. useful in remediation of soil. its branching but not as extensively as the pepperweed.
and its it is based on the seed pod
I quote ”
I

The seed pods are flat, round, and at least long when mature. They are notched at the tip, the notch much deeper than it is wide. There is a distinct separation between the outer, papery winged margin of the pod and the two seeds it contains. The large size and shape of the pods is the plant’s most distintive feature.” end quote from url: http://www.minnesotaseasons.com/Plants/field_pennycress.html

==
ONE NEEDS BETTER SHARP PICTURES OF THE SEED PODS TO SEE THE WINGS AND THE NOTCH
==
Read the identification section of this page
to see if you can see the points I have made.


Thanks for correcting me and the additional information including the distinguishing features.
I am not at all familiar with the flora of US. 
Just tried to capture whatever I could in a short available time.


You are welcome. 
do you have original pictures that you can perhaps enlarge and look at the capsules


forgot to type the binomial
Lepidium virginicum
Yes, I do have the original pictures.
Thanks, will look it up.


References:

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